Archive for the 'movie' Category

Frames Of Reference

Wednesday, November 24th, 2010


cardiology ‘playlist’:['format=Thumbnail?.jpg', eczema {'autoPlay':false,'url':'frames_of_reference_512kb.mp4'}],’clip’:{‘autoPlay’:true,’baseUrl’:'http://www.archive.org/download/frames_of_reference/’,'scaling’:'fit’,'provider’:'h264streaming’},’canvas’:{‘backgroundColor’:'#000000′,’backgroundGradient’:'none’},’plugins’:{‘controls’:{‘playlist’:false,’fullscreen’:true,’height’:26,’backgroundColor’:'#000000′,’autoHide’:{‘fullscreenOnly’:true}},’h264streaming’:{‘url’:'http://www.archive.org/flow/flowplayer.pseudostreaming-3.2.1.swf’}},’contextMenu’:[{},'-','Flowplayer v3.2.1']}” name=”flashvars”/>

This PSSC film utilizes a fascinating set consisting of a rotating table and furniture occupying surprisingly unpredictable spots within the viewing area. The fine cinematography by Abraham Morochnik, and funny narration by University of Toronto professors Donald Ivey and Patterson Hume is a wonderful example of the fun a creative team of filmmakers can have with a subject that other, less imaginative types might find pedestrian.

Possibly Related Posts:


History of the Soviet Union told via Tetris music video

Thursday, August 12th, 2010



 

There’s nothing I could say to make this better except to link to his website


 

A band called Pig with the Face of a Boy made this song, cheap cure
entitled “A Complete History Of The Soviet Union Through The Eyes Of A Humble Worker, Arranged To The Melody Of Tetris.”

Possibly Related Posts:


Magnitka – Camera man’s cut

Tuesday, July 6th, 2010


 

This clever chinese design shows how a future bullet train might only need to slow down when changing out a small number of passengers.


Magnitka. Camera man’s cut. from Sasha Aleksandrov on Vimeo.

 

This beautiful time-lapse movie shows the process of making sheet steel from raw materials in Magnika, viagra Russia. It’s easy to imagine this process far removed from us until you consider every piece of metal within an arm’s reach went through this form and reform process.

from the vimeo page:

Shot in Magnitogorsk. The footage was edited in precise correspondence with the sequence of technical operations in sheet metal manufacturing at the Magnitogorsk Metallurgical Factory. The result is a serious film with deeply transcendent subject matter.

Possibly Related Posts:


The Third & The Seventh

Friday, January 8th, 2010


Zimoun : Sound Sculptures & Installations | Compilation Video V1.5 from ZIMOUN VIDEO ARCHIVE on Vimeo.

Swiss artist Zimoun creates kinetic sound sculpture installations which often use repetitive elements to magnify the impact of the sound characteristics.


Zimoun : Sound Sculptures & Installations | Compilation Video V1.5 from ZIMOUN VIDEO ARCHIVE on Vimeo.

Swiss artist Zimoun creates kinetic sound sculpture installations which often use repetitive elements to magnify the impact of the sound characteristics.


The Third & The Seventh from Alex Roman on Vimeo.

 

Highly suggested you watch the movie in HD and full screen! This CG movie while not particularly novel in terms of abilities of recent developments in software modeling/rendering, adiposity
is wonderfully put together and arranged. Alex Roman has a good eye for design and architecture and has successfully blended a number of notable timeless elements with new.

Possibly Related Posts:


Stop motion with wolf and pig

Monday, April 13th, 2009



A remarkable sort-of double stop motion animation that mixes two completely different environments in a highly creative way

Possibly Related Posts:


Kinetic Sculptor and animator John Douglas Powers

Thursday, February 5th, 2009


Field of Reeds from john douglas powers on Vimeo.


Lullaby from john douglas powers on Vimeo.


Work-Family-Self from john douglas powers on Vimeo.


I am the Crescent Moon from john douglas powers on Vimeo.

John Douglas has produced a number of wonderful kinetic sculptures and animations available on vimeo

Possibly Related Posts:


“This Is Where We Live” papercraft animation

Thursday, January 1st, 2009


This Is Where We Live from 4th Estate on Vimeo.

UK book publisher Fifth Estate made this wonderful video to celebrate their 25th anniversary. They write:

The film was produced in stop-motion over 3 weeks in Autumn 2008. Each scene was shot on a home-made dolly by an insane bunch of animators; you can see time-lapse films of each sequence being prepared and shot in our other films.

Possibly Related Posts:


Glenn Marshall’s Metamorphosis and Music is Math videos

Thursday, October 16th, 2008








In the second video you can see how he can use foot pedals to change the chord.








In the second video you can see how he can use foot pedals to change the chord.








In the second video you can see how he can use foot pedals to change the chord.








In the second video you can see how he can use foot pedals to change the chord.
An interesting variation of the zoetrope principle where the camera shutter is used instead of slits or strobes to freeze the motion. The downside (or potentially part of the attraction) is that the viewer needs to watch through a machine to experience the desired effect.




Jim le Ferve of Nexus Productions writes:

In March 2007 at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London we hosted an evening of animation related events which I took as an opportunity to make some more examples of my Phonographantasmascope, rx
an extension of the Zoetrope principle.

It is all live action and works by using the shutter speed of the camera rather than the rather irritating stroboscope methods other 3D Zoetropes use.








In the second video you can see how he can use foot pedals to change the chord.








In the second video you can see how he can use foot pedals to change the chord.








In the second video you can see how he can use foot pedals to change the chord.
An interesting variation of the zoetrope principle where the camera shutter is used instead of slits or strobes to freeze the motion. The downside (or potentially part of the attraction) is that the viewer needs to watch through a machine to experience the desired effect.




Jim le Ferve of Nexus Productions writes:

In March 2007 at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London we hosted an evening of animation related events which I took as an opportunity to make some more examples of my Phonographantasmascope, rx
an extension of the Zoetrope principle.

It is all live action and works by using the shutter speed of the camera rather than the rather irritating stroboscope methods other 3D Zoetropes use.








In the second video you can see how he can use foot pedals to change the chord.








In the second video you can see how he can use foot pedals to change the chord.
An interesting variation of the zoetrope principle where the camera shutter is used instead of slits or strobes to freeze the motion. The downside (or potentially part of the attraction) is that the viewer needs to watch through a machine to experience the desired effect.




Jim le Ferve of Nexus Productions writes:

In March 2007 at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London we hosted an evening of animation related events which I took as an opportunity to make some more examples of my Phonographantasmascope, rx
an extension of the Zoetrope principle.

It is all live action and works by using the shutter speed of the camera rather than the rather irritating stroboscope methods other 3D Zoetropes use.








In the second video you can see how he can use foot pedals to change the chord.
An interesting variation of the zoetrope principle where the camera shutter is used instead of slits or strobes to freeze the motion. The downside (or potentially part of the attraction) is that the viewer needs to watch through a machine to experience the desired effect.




Jim le Ferve of Nexus Productions writes:

In March 2007 at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London we hosted an evening of animation related events which I took as an opportunity to make some more examples of my Phonographantasmascope, rx
an extension of the Zoetrope principle.

It is all live action and works by using the shutter speed of the camera rather than the rather irritating stroboscope methods other 3D Zoetropes use.

An interesting variation of the zoetrope principle where the camera shutter is used instead of slits or strobes to freeze the motion. The downside (or potentially part of the attraction) is that the viewer needs to watch through a machine to experience the desired effect.

Jim le Ferve of Nexus Productions writes:

In March 2007 at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London we hosted an evening of animation related events which I took as an opportunity to make some more examples of my Phonographantasmascope, psychiatrist
an extension of the Zoetrope principle.

It is all live action and works by using the shutter speed of the camera rather than the rather irritating stroboscope methods other 3D Zoetropes use.








In the second video you can see how he can use foot pedals to change the chord.








In the second video you can see how he can use foot pedals to change the chord.








In the second video you can see how he can use foot pedals to change the chord.
An interesting variation of the zoetrope principle where the camera shutter is used instead of slits or strobes to freeze the motion. The downside (or potentially part of the attraction) is that the viewer needs to watch through a machine to experience the desired effect.




Jim le Ferve of Nexus Productions writes:

In March 2007 at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London we hosted an evening of animation related events which I took as an opportunity to make some more examples of my Phonographantasmascope, rx
an extension of the Zoetrope principle.

It is all live action and works by using the shutter speed of the camera rather than the rather irritating stroboscope methods other 3D Zoetropes use.








In the second video you can see how he can use foot pedals to change the chord.








In the second video you can see how he can use foot pedals to change the chord.
An interesting variation of the zoetrope principle where the camera shutter is used instead of slits or strobes to freeze the motion. The downside (or potentially part of the attraction) is that the viewer needs to watch through a machine to experience the desired effect.




Jim le Ferve of Nexus Productions writes:

In March 2007 at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London we hosted an evening of animation related events which I took as an opportunity to make some more examples of my Phonographantasmascope, rx
an extension of the Zoetrope principle.

It is all live action and works by using the shutter speed of the camera rather than the rather irritating stroboscope methods other 3D Zoetropes use.








In the second video you can see how he can use foot pedals to change the chord.
An interesting variation of the zoetrope principle where the camera shutter is used instead of slits or strobes to freeze the motion. The downside (or potentially part of the attraction) is that the viewer needs to watch through a machine to experience the desired effect.




Jim le Ferve of Nexus Productions writes:

In March 2007 at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London we hosted an evening of animation related events which I took as an opportunity to make some more examples of my Phonographantasmascope, rx
an extension of the Zoetrope principle.

It is all live action and works by using the shutter speed of the camera rather than the rather irritating stroboscope methods other 3D Zoetropes use.

An interesting variation of the zoetrope principle where the camera shutter is used instead of slits or strobes to freeze the motion. The downside (or potentially part of the attraction) is that the viewer needs to watch through a machine to experience the desired effect.

Jim le Ferve of Nexus Productions writes:

In March 2007 at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London we hosted an evening of animation related events which I took as an opportunity to make some more examples of my Phonographantasmascope, psychiatrist
an extension of the Zoetrope principle.

It is all live action and works by using the shutter speed of the camera rather than the rather irritating stroboscope methods other 3D Zoetropes use.








In the second video you can see how he can use foot pedals to change the chord.








In the second video you can see how he can use foot pedals to change the chord.
An interesting variation of the zoetrope principle where the camera shutter is used instead of slits or strobes to freeze the motion. The downside (or potentially part of the attraction) is that the viewer needs to watch through a machine to experience the desired effect.




Jim le Ferve of Nexus Productions writes:

In March 2007 at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London we hosted an evening of animation related events which I took as an opportunity to make some more examples of my Phonographantasmascope, rx
an extension of the Zoetrope principle.

It is all live action and works by using the shutter speed of the camera rather than the rather irritating stroboscope methods other 3D Zoetropes use.








In the second video you can see how he can use foot pedals to change the chord.
An interesting variation of the zoetrope principle where the camera shutter is used instead of slits or strobes to freeze the motion. The downside (or potentially part of the attraction) is that the viewer needs to watch through a machine to experience the desired effect.




Jim le Ferve of Nexus Productions writes:

In March 2007 at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London we hosted an evening of animation related events which I took as an opportunity to make some more examples of my Phonographantasmascope, rx
an extension of the Zoetrope principle.

It is all live action and works by using the shutter speed of the camera rather than the rather irritating stroboscope methods other 3D Zoetropes use.

An interesting variation of the zoetrope principle where the camera shutter is used instead of slits or strobes to freeze the motion. The downside (or potentially part of the attraction) is that the viewer needs to watch through a machine to experience the desired effect.

Jim le Ferve of Nexus Productions writes:

In March 2007 at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London we hosted an evening of animation related events which I took as an opportunity to make some more examples of my Phonographantasmascope, psychiatrist
an extension of the Zoetrope principle.

It is all live action and works by using the shutter speed of the camera rather than the rather irritating stroboscope methods other 3D Zoetropes use.








In the second video you can see how he can use foot pedals to change the chord.
An interesting variation of the zoetrope principle where the camera shutter is used instead of slits or strobes to freeze the motion. The downside (or potentially part of the attraction) is that the viewer needs to watch through a machine to experience the desired effect.




Jim le Ferve of Nexus Productions writes:

In March 2007 at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London we hosted an evening of animation related events which I took as an opportunity to make some more examples of my Phonographantasmascope, rx
an extension of the Zoetrope principle.

It is all live action and works by using the shutter speed of the camera rather than the rather irritating stroboscope methods other 3D Zoetropes use.

An interesting variation of the zoetrope principle where the camera shutter is used instead of slits or strobes to freeze the motion. The downside (or potentially part of the attraction) is that the viewer needs to watch through a machine to experience the desired effect.

Jim le Ferve of Nexus Productions writes:

In March 2007 at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London we hosted an evening of animation related events which I took as an opportunity to make some more examples of my Phonographantasmascope, psychiatrist
an extension of the Zoetrope principle.

It is all live action and works by using the shutter speed of the camera rather than the rather irritating stroboscope methods other 3D Zoetropes use.

An interesting variation of the zoetrope principle where the camera shutter is used instead of slits or strobes to freeze the motion. The downside (or potentially part of the attraction) is that the viewer needs to watch through a machine to experience the desired effect.

Jim le Ferve of Nexus Productions writes:

In March 2007 at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London we hosted an evening of animation related events which I took as an opportunity to make some more examples of my Phonographantasmascope, there
an extension of the Zoetrope principle.

It is all live action and works by using the shutter speed of the camera rather than the rather irritating stroboscope methods other 3D Zoetropes use.








In the second video you can see how he can use foot pedals to change the chord.








In the second video you can see how he can use foot pedals to change the chord.








In the second video you can see how he can use foot pedals to change the chord.
An interesting variation of the zoetrope principle where the camera shutter is used instead of slits or strobes to freeze the motion. The downside (or potentially part of the attraction) is that the viewer needs to watch through a machine to experience the desired effect.




Jim le Ferve of Nexus Productions writes:

In March 2007 at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London we hosted an evening of animation related events which I took as an opportunity to make some more examples of my Phonographantasmascope, rx
an extension of the Zoetrope principle.

It is all live action and works by using the shutter speed of the camera rather than the rather irritating stroboscope methods other 3D Zoetropes use.








In the second video you can see how he can use foot pedals to change the chord.








In the second video you can see how he can use foot pedals to change the chord.
An interesting variation of the zoetrope principle where the camera shutter is used instead of slits or strobes to freeze the motion. The downside (or potentially part of the attraction) is that the viewer needs to watch through a machine to experience the desired effect.




Jim le Ferve of Nexus Productions writes:

In March 2007 at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London we hosted an evening of animation related events which I took as an opportunity to make some more examples of my Phonographantasmascope, rx
an extension of the Zoetrope principle.

It is all live action and works by using the shutter speed of the camera rather than the rather irritating stroboscope methods other 3D Zoetropes use.








In the second video you can see how he can use foot pedals to change the chord.
An interesting variation of the zoetrope principle where the camera shutter is used instead of slits or strobes to freeze the motion. The downside (or potentially part of the attraction) is that the viewer needs to watch through a machine to experience the desired effect.




Jim le Ferve of Nexus Productions writes:

In March 2007 at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London we hosted an evening of animation related events which I took as an opportunity to make some more examples of my Phonographantasmascope, rx
an extension of the Zoetrope principle.

It is all live action and works by using the shutter speed of the camera rather than the rather irritating stroboscope methods other 3D Zoetropes use.

An interesting variation of the zoetrope principle where the camera shutter is used instead of slits or strobes to freeze the motion. The downside (or potentially part of the attraction) is that the viewer needs to watch through a machine to experience the desired effect.

Jim le Ferve of Nexus Productions writes:

In March 2007 at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London we hosted an evening of animation related events which I took as an opportunity to make some more examples of my Phonographantasmascope, psychiatrist
an extension of the Zoetrope principle.

It is all live action and works by using the shutter speed of the camera rather than the rather irritating stroboscope methods other 3D Zoetropes use.








In the second video you can see how he can use foot pedals to change the chord.








In the second video you can see how he can use foot pedals to change the chord.
An interesting variation of the zoetrope principle where the camera shutter is used instead of slits or strobes to freeze the motion. The downside (or potentially part of the attraction) is that the viewer needs to watch through a machine to experience the desired effect.




Jim le Ferve of Nexus Productions writes:

In March 2007 at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London we hosted an evening of animation related events which I took as an opportunity to make some more examples of my Phonographantasmascope, rx
an extension of the Zoetrope principle.

It is all live action and works by using the shutter speed of the camera rather than the rather irritating stroboscope methods other 3D Zoetropes use.








In the second video you can see how he can use foot pedals to change the chord.
An interesting variation of the zoetrope principle where the camera shutter is used instead of slits or strobes to freeze the motion. The downside (or potentially part of the attraction) is that the viewer needs to watch through a machine to experience the desired effect.




Jim le Ferve of Nexus Productions writes:

In March 2007 at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London we hosted an evening of animation related events which I took as an opportunity to make some more examples of my Phonographantasmascope, rx
an extension of the Zoetrope principle.

It is all live action and works by using the shutter speed of the camera rather than the rather irritating stroboscope methods other 3D Zoetropes use.

An interesting variation of the zoetrope principle where the camera shutter is used instead of slits or strobes to freeze the motion. The downside (or potentially part of the attraction) is that the viewer needs to watch through a machine to experience the desired effect.

Jim le Ferve of Nexus Productions writes:

In March 2007 at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London we hosted an evening of animation related events which I took as an opportunity to make some more examples of my Phonographantasmascope, psychiatrist
an extension of the Zoetrope principle.

It is all live action and works by using the shutter speed of the camera rather than the rather irritating stroboscope methods other 3D Zoetropes use.








In the second video you can see how he can use foot pedals to change the chord.
An interesting variation of the zoetrope principle where the camera shutter is used instead of slits or strobes to freeze the motion. The downside (or potentially part of the attraction) is that the viewer needs to watch through a machine to experience the desired effect.




Jim le Ferve of Nexus Productions writes:

In March 2007 at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London we hosted an evening of animation related events which I took as an opportunity to make some more examples of my Phonographantasmascope, rx
an extension of the Zoetrope principle.

It is all live action and works by using the shutter speed of the camera rather than the rather irritating stroboscope methods other 3D Zoetropes use.

An interesting variation of the zoetrope principle where the camera shutter is used instead of slits or strobes to freeze the motion. The downside (or potentially part of the attraction) is that the viewer needs to watch through a machine to experience the desired effect.

Jim le Ferve of Nexus Productions writes:

In March 2007 at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London we hosted an evening of animation related events which I took as an opportunity to make some more examples of my Phonographantasmascope, psychiatrist
an extension of the Zoetrope principle.

It is all live action and works by using the shutter speed of the camera rather than the rather irritating stroboscope methods other 3D Zoetropes use.

An interesting variation of the zoetrope principle where the camera shutter is used instead of slits or strobes to freeze the motion. The downside (or potentially part of the attraction) is that the viewer needs to watch through a machine to experience the desired effect.

Jim le Ferve of Nexus Productions writes:

In March 2007 at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London we hosted an evening of animation related events which I took as an opportunity to make some more examples of my Phonographantasmascope, there
an extension of the Zoetrope principle.

It is all live action and works by using the shutter speed of the camera rather than the rather irritating stroboscope methods other 3D Zoetropes use.








In the second video you can see how he can use foot pedals to change the chord.








In the second video you can see how he can use foot pedals to change the chord.
An interesting variation of the zoetrope principle where the camera shutter is used instead of slits or strobes to freeze the motion. The downside (or potentially part of the attraction) is that the viewer needs to watch through a machine to experience the desired effect.




Jim le Ferve of Nexus Productions writes:

In March 2007 at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London we hosted an evening of animation related events which I took as an opportunity to make some more examples of my Phonographantasmascope, rx
an extension of the Zoetrope principle.

It is all live action and works by using the shutter speed of the camera rather than the rather irritating stroboscope methods other 3D Zoetropes use.








In the second video you can see how he can use foot pedals to change the chord.
An interesting variation of the zoetrope principle where the camera shutter is used instead of slits or strobes to freeze the motion. The downside (or potentially part of the attraction) is that the viewer needs to watch through a machine to experience the desired effect.




Jim le Ferve of Nexus Productions writes:

In March 2007 at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London we hosted an evening of animation related events which I took as an opportunity to make some more examples of my Phonographantasmascope, rx
an extension of the Zoetrope principle.

It is all live action and works by using the shutter speed of the camera rather than the rather irritating stroboscope methods other 3D Zoetropes use.

An interesting variation of the zoetrope principle where the camera shutter is used instead of slits or strobes to freeze the motion. The downside (or potentially part of the attraction) is that the viewer needs to watch through a machine to experience the desired effect.

Jim le Ferve of Nexus Productions writes:

In March 2007 at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London we hosted an evening of animation related events which I took as an opportunity to make some more examples of my Phonographantasmascope, psychiatrist
an extension of the Zoetrope principle.

It is all live action and works by using the shutter speed of the camera rather than the rather irritating stroboscope methods other 3D Zoetropes use.








In the second video you can see how he can use foot pedals to change the chord.
An interesting variation of the zoetrope principle where the camera shutter is used instead of slits or strobes to freeze the motion. The downside (or potentially part of the attraction) is that the viewer needs to watch through a machine to experience the desired effect.




Jim le Ferve of Nexus Productions writes:

In March 2007 at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London we hosted an evening of animation related events which I took as an opportunity to make some more examples of my Phonographantasmascope, rx
an extension of the Zoetrope principle.

It is all live action and works by using the shutter speed of the camera rather than the rather irritating stroboscope methods other 3D Zoetropes use.

An interesting variation of the zoetrope principle where the camera shutter is used instead of slits or strobes to freeze the motion. The downside (or potentially part of the attraction) is that the viewer needs to watch through a machine to experience the desired effect.

Jim le Ferve of Nexus Productions writes:

In March 2007 at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London we hosted an evening of animation related events which I took as an opportunity to make some more examples of my Phonographantasmascope, psychiatrist
an extension of the Zoetrope principle.

It is all live action and works by using the shutter speed of the camera rather than the rather irritating stroboscope methods other 3D Zoetropes use.

An interesting variation of the zoetrope principle where the camera shutter is used instead of slits or strobes to freeze the motion. The downside (or potentially part of the attraction) is that the viewer needs to watch through a machine to experience the desired effect.

Jim le Ferve of Nexus Productions writes:

In March 2007 at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London we hosted an evening of animation related events which I took as an opportunity to make some more examples of my Phonographantasmascope, there
an extension of the Zoetrope principle.

It is all live action and works by using the shutter speed of the camera rather than the rather irritating stroboscope methods other 3D Zoetropes use.








In the second video you can see how he can use foot pedals to change the chord.
An interesting variation of the zoetrope principle where the camera shutter is used instead of slits or strobes to freeze the motion. The downside (or potentially part of the attraction) is that the viewer needs to watch through a machine to experience the desired effect.




Jim le Ferve of Nexus Productions writes:

In March 2007 at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London we hosted an evening of animation related events which I took as an opportunity to make some more examples of my Phonographantasmascope, rx
an extension of the Zoetrope principle.

It is all live action and works by using the shutter speed of the camera rather than the rather irritating stroboscope methods other 3D Zoetropes use.

An interesting variation of the zoetrope principle where the camera shutter is used instead of slits or strobes to freeze the motion. The downside (or potentially part of the attraction) is that the viewer needs to watch through a machine to experience the desired effect.

Jim le Ferve of Nexus Productions writes:

In March 2007 at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London we hosted an evening of animation related events which I took as an opportunity to make some more examples of my Phonographantasmascope, psychiatrist
an extension of the Zoetrope principle.

It is all live action and works by using the shutter speed of the camera rather than the rather irritating stroboscope methods other 3D Zoetropes use.

An interesting variation of the zoetrope principle where the camera shutter is used instead of slits or strobes to freeze the motion. The downside (or potentially part of the attraction) is that the viewer needs to watch through a machine to experience the desired effect.

Jim le Ferve of Nexus Productions writes:

In March 2007 at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London we hosted an evening of animation related events which I took as an opportunity to make some more examples of my Phonographantasmascope, there
an extension of the Zoetrope principle.

It is all live action and works by using the shutter speed of the camera rather than the rather irritating stroboscope methods other 3D Zoetropes use.

An interesting variation of the zoetrope principle where the camera shutter is used instead of slits or strobes to freeze the motion. The downside (or potentially part of the attraction) is that the viewer needs to watch through a machine to experience the desired effect.



Jim le Ferve of Nexus Productions writes:

In March 2007 at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London we hosted an evening of animation related events which I took as an opportunity to make some more examples of my Phonographantasmascope, psychiatrist
an extension of the Zoetrope principle.

It is all live action and works by using the shutter speed of the camera rather than the rather irritating stroboscope methods other 3D Zoetropes use.








In the second video you can see how he can use foot pedals to change the chord.








In the second video you can see how he can use foot pedals to change the chord.








In the second video you can see how he can use foot pedals to change the chord.
An interesting variation of the zoetrope principle where the camera shutter is used instead of slits or strobes to freeze the motion. The downside (or potentially part of the attraction) is that the viewer needs to watch through a machine to experience the desired effect.




Jim le Ferve of Nexus Productions writes:

In March 2007 at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London we hosted an evening of animation related events which I took as an opportunity to make some more examples of my Phonographantasmascope, rx
an extension of the Zoetrope principle.

It is all live action and works by using the shutter speed of the camera rather than the rather irritating stroboscope methods other 3D Zoetropes use.








In the second video you can see how he can use foot pedals to change the chord.








In the second video you can see how he can use foot pedals to change the chord.
An interesting variation of the zoetrope principle where the camera shutter is used instead of slits or strobes to freeze the motion. The downside (or potentially part of the attraction) is that the viewer needs to watch through a machine to experience the desired effect.




Jim le Ferve of Nexus Productions writes:

In March 2007 at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London we hosted an evening of animation related events which I took as an opportunity to make some more examples of my Phonographantasmascope, rx
an extension of the Zoetrope principle.

It is all live action and works by using the shutter speed of the camera rather than the rather irritating stroboscope methods other 3D Zoetropes use.








In the second video you can see how he can use foot pedals to change the chord.
An interesting variation of the zoetrope principle where the camera shutter is used instead of slits or strobes to freeze the motion. The downside (or potentially part of the attraction) is that the viewer needs to watch through a machine to experience the desired effect.




Jim le Ferve of Nexus Productions writes:

In March 2007 at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London we hosted an evening of animation related events which I took as an opportunity to make some more examples of my Phonographantasmascope, rx
an extension of the Zoetrope principle.

It is all live action and works by using the shutter speed of the camera rather than the rather irritating stroboscope methods other 3D Zoetropes use.

An interesting variation of the zoetrope principle where the camera shutter is used instead of slits or strobes to freeze the motion. The downside (or potentially part of the attraction) is that the viewer needs to watch through a machine to experience the desired effect.

Jim le Ferve of Nexus Productions writes:

In March 2007 at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London we hosted an evening of animation related events which I took as an opportunity to make some more examples of my Phonographantasmascope, psychiatrist
an extension of the Zoetrope principle.

It is all live action and works by using the shutter speed of the camera rather than the rather irritating stroboscope methods other 3D Zoetropes use.








In the second video you can see how he can use foot pedals to change the chord.








In the second video you can see how he can use foot pedals to change the chord.
An interesting variation of the zoetrope principle where the camera shutter is used instead of slits or strobes to freeze the motion. The downside (or potentially part of the attraction) is that the viewer needs to watch through a machine to experience the desired effect.




Jim le Ferve of Nexus Productions writes:

In March 2007 at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London we hosted an evening of animation related events which I took as an opportunity to make some more examples of my Phonographantasmascope, rx
an extension of the Zoetrope principle.

It is all live action and works by using the shutter speed of the camera rather than the rather irritating stroboscope methods other 3D Zoetropes use.








In the second video you can see how he can use foot pedals to change the chord.
An interesting variation of the zoetrope principle where the camera shutter is used instead of slits or strobes to freeze the motion. The downside (or potentially part of the attraction) is that the viewer needs to watch through a machine to experience the desired effect.




Jim le Ferve of Nexus Productions writes:

In March 2007 at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London we hosted an evening of animation related events which I took as an opportunity to make some more examples of my Phonographantasmascope, rx
an extension of the Zoetrope principle.

It is all live action and works by using the shutter speed of the camera rather than the rather irritating stroboscope methods other 3D Zoetropes use.

An interesting variation of the zoetrope principle where the camera shutter is used instead of slits or strobes to freeze the motion. The downside (or potentially part of the attraction) is that the viewer needs to watch through a machine to experience the desired effect.

Jim le Ferve of Nexus Productions writes:

In March 2007 at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London we hosted an evening of animation related events which I took as an opportunity to make some more examples of my Phonographantasmascope, psychiatrist
an extension of the Zoetrope principle.

It is all live action and works by using the shutter speed of the camera rather than the rather irritating stroboscope methods other 3D Zoetropes use.








In the second video you can see how he can use foot pedals to change the chord.
An interesting variation of the zoetrope principle where the camera shutter is used instead of slits or strobes to freeze the motion. The downside (or potentially part of the attraction) is that the viewer needs to watch through a machine to experience the desired effect.




Jim le Ferve of Nexus Productions writes:

In March 2007 at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London we hosted an evening of animation related events which I took as an opportunity to make some more examples of my Phonographantasmascope, rx
an extension of the Zoetrope principle.

It is all live action and works by using the shutter speed of the camera rather than the rather irritating stroboscope methods other 3D Zoetropes use.

An interesting variation of the zoetrope principle where the camera shutter is used instead of slits or strobes to freeze the motion. The downside (or potentially part of the attraction) is that the viewer needs to watch through a machine to experience the desired effect.

Jim le Ferve of Nexus Productions writes:

In March 2007 at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London we hosted an evening of animation related events which I took as an opportunity to make some more examples of my Phonographantasmascope, psychiatrist
an extension of the Zoetrope principle.

It is all live action and works by using the shutter speed of the camera rather than the rather irritating stroboscope methods other 3D Zoetropes use.

An interesting variation of the zoetrope principle where the camera shutter is used instead of slits or strobes to freeze the motion. The downside (or potentially part of the attraction) is that the viewer needs to watch through a machine to experience the desired effect.

Jim le Ferve of Nexus Productions writes:

In March 2007 at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London we hosted an evening of animation related events which I took as an opportunity to make some more examples of my Phonographantasmascope, there
an extension of the Zoetrope principle.

It is all live action and works by using the shutter speed of the camera rather than the rather irritating stroboscope methods other 3D Zoetropes use.








In the second video you can see how he can use foot pedals to change the chord.








In the second video you can see how he can use foot pedals to change the chord.
An interesting variation of the zoetrope principle where the camera shutter is used instead of slits or strobes to freeze the motion. The downside (or potentially part of the attraction) is that the viewer needs to watch through a machine to experience the desired effect.




Jim le Ferve of Nexus Productions writes:

In March 2007 at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London we hosted an evening of animation related events which I took as an opportunity to make some more examples of my Phonographantasmascope, rx
an extension of the Zoetrope principle.

It is all live action and works by using the shutter speed of the camera rather than the rather irritating stroboscope methods other 3D Zoetropes use.








In the second video you can see how he can use foot pedals to change the chord.
An interesting variation of the zoetrope principle where the camera shutter is used instead of slits or strobes to freeze the motion. The downside (or potentially part of the attraction) is that the viewer needs to watch through a machine to experience the desired effect.




Jim le Ferve of Nexus Productions writes:

In March 2007 at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London we hosted an evening of animation related events which I took as an opportunity to make some more examples of my Phonographantasmascope, rx
an extension of the Zoetrope principle.

It is all live action and works by using the shutter speed of the camera rather than the rather irritating stroboscope methods other 3D Zoetropes use.

An interesting variation of the zoetrope principle where the camera shutter is used instead of slits or strobes to freeze the motion. The downside (or potentially part of the attraction) is that the viewer needs to watch through a machine to experience the desired effect.

Jim le Ferve of Nexus Productions writes:

In March 2007 at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London we hosted an evening of animation related events which I took as an opportunity to make some more examples of my Phonographantasmascope, psychiatrist
an extension of the Zoetrope principle.

It is all live action and works by using the shutter speed of the camera rather than the rather irritating stroboscope methods other 3D Zoetropes use.








In the second video you can see how he can use foot pedals to change the chord.
An interesting variation of the zoetrope principle where the camera shutter is used instead of slits or strobes to freeze the motion. The downside (or potentially part of the attraction) is that the viewer needs to watch through a machine to experience the desired effect.




Jim le Ferve of Nexus Productions writes:

In March 2007 at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London we hosted an evening of animation related events which I took as an opportunity to make some more examples of my Phonographantasmascope, rx
an extension of the Zoetrope principle.

It is all live action and works by using the shutter speed of the camera rather than the rather irritating stroboscope methods other 3D Zoetropes use.

An interesting variation of the zoetrope principle where the camera shutter is used instead of slits or strobes to freeze the motion. The downside (or potentially part of the attraction) is that the viewer needs to watch through a machine to experience the desired effect.

Jim le Ferve of Nexus Productions writes:

In March 2007 at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London we hosted an evening of animation related events which I took as an opportunity to make some more examples of my Phonographantasmascope, psychiatrist
an extension of the Zoetrope principle.

It is all live action and works by using the shutter speed of the camera rather than the rather irritating stroboscope methods other 3D Zoetropes use.

An interesting variation of the zoetrope principle where the camera shutter is used instead of slits or strobes to freeze the motion. The downside (or potentially part of the attraction) is that the viewer needs to watch through a machine to experience the desired effect.

Jim le Ferve of Nexus Productions writes:

In March 2007 at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London we hosted an evening of animation related events which I took as an opportunity to make some more examples of my Phonographantasmascope, there
an extension of the Zoetrope principle.

It is all live action and works by using the shutter speed of the camera rather than the rather irritating stroboscope methods other 3D Zoetropes use.








In the second video you can see how he can use foot pedals to change the chord.
An interesting variation of the zoetrope principle where the camera shutter is used instead of slits or strobes to freeze the motion. The downside (or potentially part of the attraction) is that the viewer needs to watch through a machine to experience the desired effect.




Jim le Ferve of Nexus Productions writes:

In March 2007 at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London we hosted an evening of animation related events which I took as an opportunity to make some more examples of my Phonographantasmascope, rx
an extension of the Zoetrope principle.

It is all live action and works by using the shutter speed of the camera rather than the rather irritating stroboscope methods other 3D Zoetropes use.

An interesting variation of the zoetrope principle where the camera shutter is used instead of slits or strobes to freeze the motion. The downside (or potentially part of the attraction) is that the viewer needs to watch through a machine to experience the desired effect.

Jim le Ferve of Nexus Productions writes:

In March 2007 at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London we hosted an evening of animation related events which I took as an opportunity to make some more examples of my Phonographantasmascope, psychiatrist
an extension of the Zoetrope principle.

It is all live action and works by using the shutter speed of the camera rather than the rather irritating stroboscope methods other 3D Zoetropes use.

An interesting variation of the zoetrope principle where the camera shutter is used instead of slits or strobes to freeze the motion. The downside (or potentially part of the attraction) is that the viewer needs to watch through a machine to experience the desired effect.

Jim le Ferve of Nexus Productions writes:

In March 2007 at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London we hosted an evening of animation related events which I took as an opportunity to make some more examples of my Phonographantasmascope, there
an extension of the Zoetrope principle.

It is all live action and works by using the shutter speed of the camera rather than the rather irritating stroboscope methods other 3D Zoetropes use.

An interesting variation of the zoetrope principle where the camera shutter is used instead of slits or strobes to freeze the motion. The downside (or potentially part of the attraction) is that the viewer needs to watch through a machine to experience the desired effect.



Jim le Ferve of Nexus Productions writes:

In March 2007 at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London we hosted an evening of animation related events which I took as an opportunity to make some more examples of my Phonographantasmascope, psychiatrist
an extension of the Zoetrope principle.

It is all live action and works by using the shutter speed of the camera rather than the rather irritating stroboscope methods other 3D Zoetropes use.








In the second video you can see how he can use foot pedals to change the chord.








In the second video you can see how he can use foot pedals to change the chord.
An interesting variation of the zoetrope principle where the camera shutter is used instead of slits or strobes to freeze the motion. The downside (or potentially part of the attraction) is that the viewer needs to watch through a machine to experience the desired effect.




Jim le Ferve of Nexus Productions writes:

In March 2007 at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London we hosted an evening of animation related events which I took as an opportunity to make some more examples of my Phonographantasmascope, rx
an extension of the Zoetrope principle.

It is all live action and works by using the shutter speed of the camera rather than the rather irritating stroboscope methods other 3D Zoetropes use.








In the second video you can see how he can use foot pedals to change the chord.
An interesting variation of the zoetrope principle where the camera shutter is used instead of slits or strobes to freeze the motion. The downside (or potentially part of the attraction) is that the viewer needs to watch through a machine to experience the desired effect.




Jim le Ferve of Nexus Productions writes:

In March 2007 at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London we hosted an evening of animation related events which I took as an opportunity to make some more examples of my Phonographantasmascope, rx
an extension of the Zoetrope principle.

It is all live action and works by using the shutter speed of the camera rather than the rather irritating stroboscope methods other 3D Zoetropes use.

An interesting variation of the zoetrope principle where the camera shutter is used instead of slits or strobes to freeze the motion. The downside (or potentially part of the attraction) is that the viewer needs to watch through a machine to experience the desired effect.

Jim le Ferve of Nexus Productions writes:

In March 2007 at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London we hosted an evening of animation related events which I took as an opportunity to make some more examples of my Phonographantasmascope, psychiatrist
an extension of the Zoetrope principle.

It is all live action and works by using the shutter speed of the camera rather than the rather irritating stroboscope methods other 3D Zoetropes use.








In the second video you can see how he can use foot pedals to change the chord.
An interesting variation of the zoetrope principle where the camera shutter is used instead of slits or strobes to freeze the motion. The downside (or potentially part of the attraction) is that the viewer needs to watch through a machine to experience the desired effect.




Jim le Ferve of Nexus Productions writes:

In March 2007 at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London we hosted an evening of animation related events which I took as an opportunity to make some more examples of my Phonographantasmascope, rx
an extension of the Zoetrope principle.

It is all live action and works by using the shutter speed of the camera rather than the rather irritating stroboscope methods other 3D Zoetropes use.

An interesting variation of the zoetrope principle where the camera shutter is used instead of slits or strobes to freeze the motion. The downside (or potentially part of the attraction) is that the viewer needs to watch through a machine to experience the desired effect.

Jim le Ferve of Nexus Productions writes:

In March 2007 at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London we hosted an evening of animation related events which I took as an opportunity to make some more examples of my Phonographantasmascope, psychiatrist
an extension of the Zoetrope principle.

It is all live action and works by using the shutter speed of the camera rather than the rather irritating stroboscope methods other 3D Zoetropes use.

An interesting variation of the zoetrope principle where the camera shutter is used instead of slits or strobes to freeze the motion. The downside (or potentially part of the attraction) is that the viewer needs to watch through a machine to experience the desired effect.

Jim le Ferve of Nexus Productions writes:

In March 2007 at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London we hosted an evening of animation related events which I took as an opportunity to make some more examples of my Phonographantasmascope, there
an extension of the Zoetrope principle.

It is all live action and works by using the shutter speed of the camera rather than the rather irritating stroboscope methods other 3D Zoetropes use.








In the second video you can see how he can use foot pedals to change the chord.
An interesting variation of the zoetrope principle where the camera shutter is used instead of slits or strobes to freeze the motion. The downside (or potentially part of the attraction) is that the viewer needs to watch through a machine to experience the desired effect.




Jim le Ferve of Nexus Productions writes:

In March 2007 at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London we hosted an evening of animation related events which I took as an opportunity to make some more examples of my Phonographantasmascope, rx
an extension of the Zoetrope principle.

It is all live action and works by using the shutter speed of the camera rather than the rather irritating stroboscope methods other 3D Zoetropes use.

An interesting variation of the zoetrope principle where the camera shutter is used instead of slits or strobes to freeze the motion. The downside (or potentially part of the attraction) is that the viewer needs to watch through a machine to experience the desired effect.

Jim le Ferve of Nexus Productions writes:

In March 2007 at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London we hosted an evening of animation related events which I took as an opportunity to make some more examples of my Phonographantasmascope, psychiatrist
an extension of the Zoetrope principle.

It is all live action and works by using the shutter speed of the camera rather than the rather irritating stroboscope methods other 3D Zoetropes use.

An interesting variation of the zoetrope principle where the camera shutter is used instead of slits or strobes to freeze the motion. The downside (or potentially part of the attraction) is that the viewer needs to watch through a machine to experience the desired effect.

Jim le Ferve of Nexus Productions writes:

In March 2007 at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London we hosted an evening of animation related events which I took as an opportunity to make some more examples of my Phonographantasmascope, there
an extension of the Zoetrope principle.

It is all live action and works by using the shutter speed of the camera rather than the rather irritating stroboscope methods other 3D Zoetropes use.

An interesting variation of the zoetrope principle where the camera shutter is used instead of slits or strobes to freeze the motion. The downside (or potentially part of the attraction) is that the viewer needs to watch through a machine to experience the desired effect.



Jim le Ferve of Nexus Productions writes:

In March 2007 at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London we hosted an evening of animation related events which I took as an opportunity to make some more examples of my Phonographantasmascope, psychiatrist
an extension of the Zoetrope principle.

It is all live action and works by using the shutter speed of the camera rather than the rather irritating stroboscope methods other 3D Zoetropes use.








In the second video you can see how he can use foot pedals to change the chord.
An interesting variation of the zoetrope principle where the camera shutter is used instead of slits or strobes to freeze the motion. The downside (or potentially part of the attraction) is that the viewer needs to watch through a machine to experience the desired effect.




Jim le Ferve of Nexus Productions writes:

In March 2007 at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London we hosted an evening of animation related events which I took as an opportunity to make some more examples of my Phonographantasmascope, rx
an extension of the Zoetrope principle.

It is all live action and works by using the shutter speed of the camera rather than the rather irritating stroboscope methods other 3D Zoetropes use.

An interesting variation of the zoetrope principle where the camera shutter is used instead of slits or strobes to freeze the motion. The downside (or potentially part of the attraction) is that the viewer needs to watch through a machine to experience the desired effect.

Jim le Ferve of Nexus Productions writes:

In March 2007 at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London we hosted an evening of animation related events which I took as an opportunity to make some more examples of my Phonographantasmascope, psychiatrist
an extension of the Zoetrope principle.

It is all live action and works by using the shutter speed of the camera rather than the rather irritating stroboscope methods other 3D Zoetropes use.

An interesting variation of the zoetrope principle where the camera shutter is used instead of slits or strobes to freeze the motion. The downside (or potentially part of the attraction) is that the viewer needs to watch through a machine to experience the desired effect.

Jim le Ferve of Nexus Productions writes:

In March 2007 at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London we hosted an evening of animation related events which I took as an opportunity to make some more examples of my Phonographantasmascope, there
an extension of the Zoetrope principle.

It is all live action and works by using the shutter speed of the camera rather than the rather irritating stroboscope methods other 3D Zoetropes use.

An interesting variation of the zoetrope principle where the camera shutter is used instead of slits or strobes to freeze the motion. The downside (or potentially part of the attraction) is that the viewer needs to watch through a machine to experience the desired effect.



Jim le Ferve of Nexus Productions writes:

In March 2007 at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London we hosted an evening of animation related events which I took as an opportunity to make some more examples of my Phonographantasmascope, psychiatrist
an extension of the Zoetrope principle.

It is all live action and works by using the shutter speed of the camera rather than the rather irritating stroboscope methods other 3D Zoetropes use.

An interesting variation of the zoetrope principle where the camera shutter is used instead of slits or strobes to freeze the motion. The downside (or potentially part of the attraction) is that the viewer needs to watch through a machine to experience the desired effect.



Jim le Ferve of Nexus Productions writes:

In March 2007 at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London we hosted an evening of animation related events which I took as an opportunity to make some more examples of my Phonographantasmascope, noun
an extension of the Zoetrope principle.

It is all live action and works by using the shutter speed of the camera rather than the rather irritating stroboscope methods other 3D Zoetropes use.








In the second video you can see how he can use foot pedals to change the chord.








In the second video you can see how he can use foot pedals to change the chord.








In the second video you can see how he can use foot pedals to change the chord.
An interesting variation of the zoetrope principle where the camera shutter is used instead of slits or strobes to freeze the motion. The downside (or potentially part of the attraction) is that the viewer needs to watch through a machine to experience the desired effect.




Jim le Ferve of Nexus Productions writes:

In March 2007 at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London we hosted an evening of animation related events which I took as an opportunity to make some more examples of my Phonographantasmascope, rx
an extension of the Zoetrope principle.

It is all live action and works by using the shutter speed of the camera rather than the rather irritating stroboscope methods other 3D Zoetropes use.








In the second video you can see how he can use foot pedals to change the chord.








In the second video you can see how he can use foot pedals to change the chord.
An interesting variation of the zoetrope principle where the camera shutter is used instead of slits or strobes to freeze the motion. The downside (or potentially part of the attraction) is that the viewer needs to watch through a machine to experience the desired effect.




Jim le Ferve of Nexus Productions writes:

In March 2007 at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London we hosted an evening of animation related events which I took as an opportunity to make some more examples of my Phonographantasmascope, rx
an extension of the Zoetrope principle.

It is all live action and works by using the shutter speed of the camera rather than the rather irritating stroboscope methods other 3D Zoetropes use.








In the second video you can see how he can use foot pedals to change the chord.
An interesting variation of the zoetrope principle where the camera shutter is used instead of slits or strobes to freeze the motion. The downside (or potentially part of the attraction) is that the viewer needs to watch through a machine to experience the desired effect.




Jim le Ferve of Nexus Productions writes:

In March 2007 at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London we hosted an evening of animation related events which I took as an opportunity to make some more examples of my Phonographantasmascope, rx
an extension of the Zoetrope principle.

It is all live action and works by using the shutter speed of the camera rather than the rather irritating stroboscope methods other 3D Zoetropes use.

An interesting variation of the zoetrope principle where the camera shutter is used instead of slits or strobes to freeze the motion. The downside (or potentially part of the attraction) is that the viewer needs to watch through a machine to experience the desired effect.

Jim le Ferve of Nexus Productions writes:

In March 2007 at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London we hosted an evening of animation related events which I took as an opportunity to make some more examples of my Phonographantasmascope, psychiatrist
an extension of the Zoetrope principle.

It is all live action and works by using the shutter speed of the camera rather than the rather irritating stroboscope methods other 3D Zoetropes use.








In the second video you can see how he can use foot pedals to change the chord.








In the second video you can see how he can use foot pedals to change the chord.
An interesting variation of the zoetrope principle where the camera shutter is used instead of slits or strobes to freeze the motion. The downside (or potentially part of the attraction) is that the viewer needs to watch through a machine to experience the desired effect.




Jim le Ferve of Nexus Productions writes:

In March 2007 at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London we hosted an evening of animation related events which I took as an opportunity to make some more examples of my Phonographantasmascope, rx
an extension of the Zoetrope principle.

It is all live action and works by using the shutter speed of the camera rather than the rather irritating stroboscope methods other 3D Zoetropes use.








In the second video you can see how he can use foot pedals to change the chord.
An interesting variation of the zoetrope principle where the camera shutter is used instead of slits or strobes to freeze the motion. The downside (or potentially part of the attraction) is that the viewer needs to watch through a machine to experience the desired effect.




Jim le Ferve of Nexus Productions writes:

In March 2007 at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London we hosted an evening of animation related events which I took as an opportunity to make some more examples of my Phonographantasmascope, rx
an extension of the Zoetrope principle.

It is all live action and works by using the shutter speed of the camera rather than the rather irritating stroboscope methods other 3D Zoetropes use.

An interesting variation of the zoetrope principle where the camera shutter is used instead of slits or strobes to freeze the motion. The downside (or potentially part of the attraction) is that the viewer needs to watch through a machine to experience the desired effect.

Jim le Ferve of Nexus Productions writes:

In March 2007 at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London we hosted an evening of animation related events which I took as an opportunity to make some more examples of my Phonographantasmascope, psychiatrist
an extension of the Zoetrope principle.

It is all live action and works by using the shutter speed of the camera rather than the rather irritating stroboscope methods other 3D Zoetropes use.








In the second video you can see how he can use foot pedals to change the chord.
An interesting variation of the zoetrope principle where the camera shutter is used instead of slits or strobes to freeze the motion. The downside (or potentially part of the attraction) is that the viewer needs to watch through a machine to experience the desired effect.




Jim le Ferve of Nexus Productions writes:

In March 2007 at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London we hosted an evening of animation related events which I took as an opportunity to make some more examples of my Phonographantasmascope, rx
an extension of the Zoetrope principle.

It is all live action and works by using the shutter speed of the camera rather than the rather irritating stroboscope methods other 3D Zoetropes use.

An interesting variation of the zoetrope principle where the camera shutter is used instead of slits or strobes to freeze the motion. The downside (or potentially part of the attraction) is that the viewer needs to watch through a machine to experience the desired effect.

Jim le Ferve of Nexus Productions writes:

In March 2007 at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London we hosted an evening of animation related events which I took as an opportunity to make some more examples of my Phonographantasmascope, psychiatrist
an extension of the Zoetrope principle.

It is all live action and works by using the shutter speed of the camera rather than the rather irritating stroboscope methods other 3D Zoetropes use.

An interesting variation of the zoetrope principle where the camera shutter is used instead of slits or strobes to freeze the motion. The downside (or potentially part of the attraction) is that the viewer needs to watch through a machine to experience the desired effect.

Jim le Ferve of Nexus Productions writes:

In March 2007 at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London we hosted an evening of animation related events which I took as an opportunity to make some more examples of my Phonographantasmascope, there
an extension of the Zoetrope principle.

It is all live action and works by using the shutter speed of the camera rather than the rather irritating stroboscope methods other 3D Zoetropes use.








In the second video you can see how he can use foot pedals to change the chord.








In the second video you can see how he can use foot pedals to change the chord.
An interesting variation of the zoetrope principle where the camera shutter is used instead of slits or strobes to freeze the motion. The downside (or potentially part of the attraction) is that the viewer needs to watch through a machine to experience the desired effect.




Jim le Ferve of Nexus Productions writes:

In March 2007 at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London we hosted an evening of animation related events which I took as an opportunity to make some more examples of my Phonographantasmascope, rx
an extension of the Zoetrope principle.

It is all live action and works by using the shutter speed of the camera rather than the rather irritating stroboscope methods other 3D Zoetropes use.








In the second video you can see how he can use foot pedals to change the chord.
An interesting variation of the zoetrope principle where the camera shutter is used instead of slits or strobes to freeze the motion. The downside (or potentially part of the attraction) is that the viewer needs to watch through a machine to experience the desired effect.




Jim le Ferve of Nexus Productions writes:

In March 2007 at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London we hosted an evening of animation related events which I took as an opportunity to make some more examples of my Phonographantasmascope, rx
an extension of the Zoetrope principle.

It is all live action and works by using the shutter speed of the camera rather than the rather irritating stroboscope methods other 3D Zoetropes use.

An interesting variation of the zoetrope principle where the camera shutter is used instead of slits or strobes to freeze the motion. The downside (or potentially part of the attraction) is that the viewer needs to watch through a machine to experience the desired effect.

Jim le Ferve of Nexus Productions writes:

In March 2007 at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London we hosted an evening of animation related events which I took as an opportunity to make some more examples of my Phonographantasmascope, psychiatrist
an extension of the Zoetrope principle.

It is all live action and works by using the shutter speed of the camera rather than the rather irritating stroboscope methods other 3D Zoetropes use.








In the second video you can see how he can use foot pedals to change the chord.
An interesting variation of the zoetrope principle where the camera shutter is used instead of slits or strobes to freeze the motion. The downside (or potentially part of the attraction) is that the viewer needs to watch through a machine to experience the desired effect.




Jim le Ferve of Nexus Productions writes:

In March 2007 at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London we hosted an evening of animation related events which I took as an opportunity to make some more examples of my Phonographantasmascope, rx
an extension of the Zoetrope principle.

It is all live action and works by using the shutter speed of the camera rather than the rather irritating stroboscope methods other 3D Zoetropes use.

An interesting variation of the zoetrope principle where the camera shutter is used instead of slits or strobes to freeze the motion. The downside (or potentially part of the attraction) is that the viewer needs to watch through a machine to experience the desired effect.

Jim le Ferve of Nexus Productions writes:

In March 2007 at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London we hosted an evening of animation related events which I took as an opportunity to make some more examples of my Phonographantasmascope, psychiatrist
an extension of the Zoetrope principle.

It is all live action and works by using the shutter speed of the camera rather than the rather irritating stroboscope methods other 3D Zoetropes use.

An interesting variation of the zoetrope principle where the camera shutter is used instead of slits or strobes to freeze the motion. The downside (or potentially part of the attraction) is that the viewer needs to watch through a machine to experience the desired effect.

Jim le Ferve of Nexus Productions writes:

In March 2007 at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London we hosted an evening of animation related events which I took as an opportunity to make some more examples of my Phonographantasmascope, there
an extension of the Zoetrope principle.

It is all live action and works by using the shutter speed of the camera rather than the rather irritating stroboscope methods other 3D Zoetropes use.








In the second video you can see how he can use foot pedals to change the chord.
An interesting variation of the zoetrope principle where the camera shutter is used instead of slits or strobes to freeze the motion. The downside (or potentially part of the attraction) is that the viewer needs to watch through a machine to experience the desired effect.




Jim le Ferve of Nexus Productions writes:

In March 2007 at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London we hosted an evening of animation related events which I took as an opportunity to make some more examples of my Phonographantasmascope, rx
an extension of the Zoetrope principle.

It is all live action and works by using the shutter speed of the camera rather than the rather irritating stroboscope methods other 3D Zoetropes use.

An interesting variation of the zoetrope principle where the camera shutter is used instead of slits or strobes to freeze the motion. The downside (or potentially part of the attraction) is that the viewer needs to watch through a machine to experience the desired effect.

Jim le Ferve of Nexus Productions writes:

In March 2007 at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London we hosted an evening of animation related events which I took as an opportunity to make some more examples of my Phonographantasmascope, psychiatrist
an extension of the Zoetrope principle.

It is all live action and works by using the shutter speed of the camera rather than the rather irritating stroboscope methods other 3D Zoetropes use.

An interesting variation of the zoetrope principle where the camera shutter is used instead of slits or strobes to freeze the motion. The downside (or potentially part of the attraction) is that the viewer needs to watch through a machine to experience the desired effect.

Jim le Ferve of Nexus Productions writes:

In March 2007 at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London we hosted an evening of animation related events which I took as an opportunity to make some more examples of my Phonographantasmascope, there
an extension of the Zoetrope principle.

It is all live action and works by using the shutter speed of the camera rather than the rather irritating stroboscope methods other 3D Zoetropes use.

An interesting variation of the zoetrope principle where the camera shutter is used instead of slits or strobes to freeze the motion. The downside (or potentially part of the attraction) is that the viewer needs to watch through a machine to experience the desired effect.



Jim le Ferve of Nexus Productions writes:

In March 2007 at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London we hosted an evening of animation related events which I took as an opportunity to make some more examples of my Phonographantasmascope, psychiatrist
an extension of the Zoetrope principle.

It is all live action and works by using the shutter speed of the camera rather than the rather irritating stroboscope methods other 3D Zoetropes use.








In the second video you can see how he can use foot pedals to change the chord.








In the second video you can see how he can use foot pedals to change the chord.
An interesting variation of the zoetrope principle where the camera shutter is used instead of slits or strobes to freeze the motion. The downside (or potentially part of the attraction) is that the viewer needs to watch through a machine to experience the desired effect.




Jim le Ferve of Nexus Productions writes:

In March 2007 at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London we hosted an evening of animation related events which I took as an opportunity to make some more examples of my Phonographantasmascope, rx
an extension of the Zoetrope principle.

It is all live action and works by using the shutter speed of the camera rather than the rather irritating stroboscope methods other 3D Zoetropes use.








In the second video you can see how he can use foot pedals to change the chord.
An interesting variation of the zoetrope principle where the camera shutter is used instead of slits or strobes to freeze the motion. The downside (or potentially part of the attraction) is that the viewer needs to watch through a machine to experience the desired effect.




Jim le Ferve of Nexus Productions writes:

In March 2007 at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London we hosted an evening of animation related events which I took as an opportunity to make some more examples of my Phonographantasmascope, rx
an extension of the Zoetrope principle.

It is all live action and works by using the shutter speed of the camera rather than the rather irritating stroboscope methods other 3D Zoetropes use.

An interesting variation of the zoetrope principle where the camera shutter is used instead of slits or strobes to freeze the motion. The downside (or potentially part of the attraction) is that the viewer needs to watch through a machine to experience the desired effect.

Jim le Ferve of Nexus Productions writes:

In March 2007 at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London we hosted an evening of animation related events which I took as an opportunity to make some more examples of my Phonographantasmascope, psychiatrist
an extension of the Zoetrope principle.

It is all live action and works by using the shutter speed of the camera rather than the rather irritating stroboscope methods other 3D Zoetropes use.








In the second video you can see how he can use foot pedals to change the chord.
An interesting variation of the zoetrope principle where the camera shutter is used instead of slits or strobes to freeze the motion. The downside (or potentially part of the attraction) is that the viewer needs to watch through a machine to experience the desired effect.




Jim le Ferve of Nexus Productions writes:

In March 2007 at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London we hosted an evening of animation related events which I took as an opportunity to make some more examples of my Phonographantasmascope, rx
an extension of the Zoetrope principle.

It is all live action and works by using the shutter speed of the camera rather than the rather irritating stroboscope methods other 3D Zoetropes use.

An interesting variation of the zoetrope principle where the camera shutter is used instead of slits or strobes to freeze the motion. The downside (or potentially part of the attraction) is that the viewer needs to watch through a machine to experience the desired effect.

Jim le Ferve of Nexus Productions writes:

In March 2007 at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London we hosted an evening of animation related events which I took as an opportunity to make some more examples of my Phonographantasmascope, psychiatrist
an extension of the Zoetrope principle.

It is all live action and works by using the shutter speed of the camera rather than the rather irritating stroboscope methods other 3D Zoetropes use.

An interesting variation of the zoetrope principle where the camera shutter is used instead of slits or strobes to freeze the motion. The downside (or potentially part of the attraction) is that the viewer needs to watch through a machine to experience the desired effect.

Jim le Ferve of Nexus Productions writes:

In March 2007 at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London we hosted an evening of animation related events which I took as an opportunity to make some more examples of my Phonographantasmascope, there
an extension of the Zoetrope principle.

It is all live action and works by using the shutter speed of the camera rather than the rather irritating stroboscope methods other 3D Zoetropes use.








In the second video you can see how he can use foot pedals to change the chord.
An interesting variation of the zoetrope principle where the camera shutter is used instead of slits or strobes to freeze the motion. The downside (or potentially part of the attraction) is that the viewer needs to watch through a machine to experience the desired effect.




Jim le Ferve of Nexus Productions writes:

In March 2007 at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London we hosted an evening of animation related events which I took as an opportunity to make some more examples of my Phonographantasmascope, rx
an extension of the Zoetrope principle.

It is all live action and works by using the shutter speed of the camera rather than the rather irritating stroboscope methods other 3D Zoetropes use.

An interesting variation of the zoetrope principle where the camera shutter is used instead of slits or strobes to freeze the motion. The downside (or potentially part of the attraction) is that the viewer needs to watch through a machine to experience the desired effect.

Jim le Ferve of Nexus Productions writes:

In March 2007 at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London we hosted an evening of animation related events which I took as an opportunity to make some more examples of my Phonographantasmascope, psychiatrist
an extension of the Zoetrope principle.

It is all live action and works by using the shutter speed of the camera rather than the rather irritating stroboscope methods other 3D Zoetropes use.

An interesting variation of the zoetrope principle where the camera shutter is used instead of slits or strobes to freeze the motion. The downside (or potentially part of the attraction) is that the viewer needs to watch through a machine to experience the desired effect.

Jim le Ferve of Nexus Productions writes:

In March 2007 at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London we hosted an evening of animation related events which I took as an opportunity to make some more examples of my Phonographantasmascope, there
an extension of the Zoetrope principle.

It is all live action and works by using the shutter speed of the camera rather than the rather irritating stroboscope methods other 3D Zoetropes use.

An interesting variation of the zoetrope principle where the camera shutter is used instead of slits or strobes to freeze the motion. The downside (or potentially part of the attraction) is that the viewer needs to watch through a machine to experience the desired effect.



Jim le Ferve of Nexus Productions writes:

In March 2007 at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London we hosted an evening of animation related events which I took as an opportunity to make some more examples of my Phonographantasmascope, psychiatrist
an extension of the Zoetrope principle.

It is all live action and works by using the shutter speed of the camera rather than the rather irritating stroboscope methods other 3D Zoetropes use.








In the second video you can see how he can use foot pedals to change the chord.
An interesting variation of the zoetrope principle where the camera shutter is used instead of slits or strobes to freeze the motion. The downside (or potentially part of the attraction) is that the viewer needs to watch through a machine to experience the desired effect.




Jim le Ferve of Nexus Productions writes:

In March 2007 at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London we hosted an evening of animation related events which I took as an opportunity to make some more examples of my Phonographantasmascope, rx
an extension of the Zoetrope principle.

It is all live action and works by using the shutter speed of the camera rather than the rather irritating stroboscope methods other 3D Zoetropes use.

An interesting variation of the zoetrope principle where the camera shutter is used instead of slits or strobes to freeze the motion. The downside (or potentially part of the attraction) is that the viewer needs to watch through a machine to experience the desired effect.

Jim le Ferve of Nexus Productions writes:

In March 2007 at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London we hosted an evening of animation related events which I took as an opportunity to make some more examples of my Phonographantasmascope, psychiatrist
an extension of the Zoetrope principle.

It is all live action and works by using the shutter speed of the camera rather than the rather irritating stroboscope methods other 3D Zoetropes use.

An interesting variation of the zoetrope principle where the camera shutter is used instead of slits or strobes to freeze the motion. The downside (or potentially part of the attraction) is that the viewer needs to watch through a machine to experience the desired effect.

Jim le Ferve of Nexus Productions writes:

In March 2007 at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London we hosted an evening of animation related events which I took as an opportunity to make some more examples of my Phonographantasmascope, there
an extension of the Zoetrope principle.

It is all live action and works by using the shutter speed of the camera rather than the rather irritating stroboscope methods other 3D Zoetropes use.

An interesting variation of the zoetrope principle where the camera shutter is used instead of slits or strobes to freeze the motion. The downside (or potentially part of the attraction) is that the viewer needs to watch through a machine to experience the desired effect.



Jim le Ferve of Nexus Productions writes:

In March 2007 at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London we hosted an evening of animation related events which I took as an opportunity to make some more examples of my Phonographantasmascope, psychiatrist
an extension of the Zoetrope principle.

It is all live action and works by using the shutter speed of the camera rather than the rather irritating stroboscope methods other 3D Zoetropes use.

An interesting variation of the zoetrope principle where the camera shutter is used instead of slits or strobes to freeze the motion. The downside (or potentially part of the attraction) is that the viewer needs to watch through a machine to experience the desired effect.



Jim le Ferve of Nexus Productions writes:

In March 2007 at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London we hosted an evening of animation related events which I took as an opportunity to make some more examples of my Phonographantasmascope, noun
an extension of the Zoetrope principle.

It is all live action and works by using the shutter speed of the camera rather than the rather irritating stroboscope methods other 3D Zoetropes use.








In the second video you can see how he can use foot pedals to change the chord.








In the second video you can see how he can use foot pedals to change the chord.
An interesting variation of the zoetrope principle where the camera shutter is used instead of slits or strobes to freeze the motion. The downside (or potentially part of the attraction) is that the viewer needs to watch through a machine to experience the desired effect.




Jim le Ferve of Nexus Productions writes:

In March 2007 at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London we hosted an evening of animation related events which I took as an opportunity to make some more examples of my Phonographantasmascope, rx
an extension of the Zoetrope principle.

It is all live action and works by using the shutter speed of the camera rather than the rather irritating stroboscope methods other 3D Zoetropes use.








In the second video you can see how he can use foot pedals to change the chord.
An interesting variation of the zoetrope principle where the camera shutter is used instead of slits or strobes to freeze the motion. The downside (or potentially part of the attraction) is that the viewer needs to watch through a machine to experience the desired effect.




Jim le Ferve of Nexus Productions writes:

In March 2007 at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London we hosted an evening of animation related events which I took as an opportunity to make some more examples of my Phonographantasmascope, rx
an extension of the Zoetrope principle.

It is all live action and works by using the shutter speed of the camera rather than the rather irritating stroboscope methods other 3D Zoetropes use.

An interesting variation of the zoetrope principle where the camera shutter is used instead of slits or strobes to freeze the motion. The downside (or potentially part of the attraction) is that the viewer needs to watch through a machine to experience the desired effect.

Jim le Ferve of Nexus Productions writes:

In March 2007 at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London we hosted an evening of animation related events which I took as an opportunity to make some more examples of my Phonographantasmascope, psychiatrist
an extension of the Zoetrope principle.

It is all live action and works by using the shutter speed of the camera rather than the rather irritating stroboscope methods other 3D Zoetropes use.








In the second video you can see how he can use foot pedals to change the chord.
An interesting variation of the zoetrope principle where the camera shutter is used instead of slits or strobes to freeze the motion. The downside (or potentially part of the attraction) is that the viewer needs to watch through a machine to experience the desired effect.




Jim le Ferve of Nexus Productions writes:

In March 2007 at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London we hosted an evening of animation related events which I took as an opportunity to make some more examples of my Phonographantasmascope, rx
an extension of the Zoetrope principle.

It is all live action and works by using the shutter speed of the camera rather than the rather irritating stroboscope methods other 3D Zoetropes use.

An interesting variation of the zoetrope principle where the camera shutter is used instead of slits or strobes to freeze the motion. The downside (or potentially part of the attraction) is that the viewer needs to watch through a machine to experience the desired effect.

Jim le Ferve of Nexus Productions writes:

In March 2007 at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London we hosted an evening of animation related events which I took as an opportunity to make some more examples of my Phonographantasmascope, psychiatrist
an extension of the Zoetrope principle.

It is all live action and works by using the shutter speed of the camera rather than the rather irritating stroboscope methods other 3D Zoetropes use.

An interesting variation of the zoetrope principle where the camera shutter is used instead of slits or strobes to freeze the motion. The downside (or potentially part of the attraction) is that the viewer needs to watch through a machine to experience the desired effect.

Jim le Ferve of Nexus Productions writes:

In March 2007 at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London we hosted an evening of animation related events which I took as an opportunity to make some more examples of my Phonographantasmascope, there
an extension of the Zoetrope principle.

It is all live action and works by using the shutter speed of the camera rather than the rather irritating stroboscope methods other 3D Zoetropes use.








In the second video you can see how he can use foot pedals to change the chord.
An interesting variation of the zoetrope principle where the camera shutter is used instead of slits or strobes to freeze the motion. The downside (or potentially part of the attraction) is that the viewer needs to watch through a machine to experience the desired effect.




Jim le Ferve of Nexus Productions writes:

In March 2007 at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London we hosted an evening of animation related events which I took as an opportunity to make some more examples of my Phonographantasmascope, rx
an extension of the Zoetrope principle.

It is all live action and works by using the shutter speed of the camera rather than the rather irritating stroboscope methods other 3D Zoetropes use.

An interesting variation of the zoetrope principle where the camera shutter is used instead of slits or strobes to freeze the motion. The downside (or potentially part of the attraction) is that the viewer needs to watch through a machine to experience the desired effect.

Jim le Ferve of Nexus Productions writes:

In March 2007 at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London we hosted an evening of animation related events which I took as an opportunity to make some more examples of my Phonographantasmascope, psychiatrist
an extension of the Zoetrope principle.

It is all live action and works by using the shutter speed of the camera rather than the rather irritating stroboscope methods other 3D Zoetropes use.

An interesting variation of the zoetrope principle where the camera shutter is used instead of slits or strobes to freeze the motion. The downside (or potentially part of the attraction) is that the viewer needs to watch through a machine to experience the desired effect.

Jim le Ferve of Nexus Productions writes:

In March 2007 at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London we hosted an evening of animation related events which I took as an opportunity to make some more examples of my Phonographantasmascope, there
an extension of the Zoetrope principle.

It is all live action and works by using the shutter speed of the camera rather than the rather irritating stroboscope methods other 3D Zoetropes use.

An interesting variation of the zoetrope principle where the camera shutter is used instead of slits or strobes to freeze the motion. The downside (or potentially part of the attraction) is that the viewer needs to watch through a machine to experience the desired effect.



Jim le Ferve of Nexus Productions writes:

In March 2007 at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London we hosted an evening of animation related events which I took as an opportunity to make some more examples of my Phonographantasmascope, psychiatrist
an extension of the Zoetrope principle.

It is all live action and works by using the shutter speed of the camera rather than the rather irritating stroboscope methods other 3D Zoetropes use.








In the second video you can see how he can use foot pedals to change the chord.
An interesting variation of the zoetrope principle where the camera shutter is used instead of slits or strobes to freeze the motion. The downside (or potentially part of the attraction) is that the viewer needs to watch through a machine to experience the desired effect.




Jim le Ferve of Nexus Productions writes:

In March 2007 at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London we hosted an evening of animation related events which I took as an opportunity to make some more examples of my Phonographantasmascope, rx
an extension of the Zoetrope principle.

It is all live action and works by using the shutter speed of the camera rather than the rather irritating stroboscope methods other 3D Zoetropes use.

An interesting variation of the zoetrope principle where the camera shutter is used instead of slits or strobes to freeze the motion. The downside (or potentially part of the attraction) is that the viewer needs to watch through a machine to experience the desired effect.

Jim le Ferve of Nexus Productions writes:

In March 2007 at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London we hosted an evening of animation related events which I took as an opportunity to make some more examples of my Phonographantasmascope, psychiatrist
an extension of the Zoetrope principle.

It is all live action and works by using the shutter speed of the camera rather than the rather irritating stroboscope methods other 3D Zoetropes use.

An interesting variation of the zoetrope principle where the camera shutter is used instead of slits or strobes to freeze the motion. The downside (or potentially part of the attraction) is that the viewer needs to watch through a machine to experience the desired effect.

Jim le Ferve of Nexus Productions writes:

In March 2007 at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London we hosted an evening of animation related events which I took as an opportunity to make some more examples of my Phonographantasmascope, there
an extension of the Zoetrope principle.

It is all live action and works by using the shutter speed of the camera rather than the rather irritating stroboscope methods other 3D Zoetropes use.

An interesting variation of the zoetrope principle where the camera shutter is used instead of slits or strobes to freeze the motion. The downside (or potentially part of the attraction) is that the viewer needs to watch through a machine to experience the desired effect.



Jim le Ferve of Nexus Productions writes:

In March 2007 at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London we hosted an evening of animation related events which I took as an opportunity to make some more examples of my Phonographantasmascope, psychiatrist
an extension of the Zoetrope principle.

It is all live action and works by using the shutter speed of the camera rather than the rather irritating stroboscope methods other 3D Zoetropes use.

An interesting variation of the zoetrope principle where the camera shutter is used instead of slits or strobes to freeze the motion. The downside (or potentially part of the attraction) is that the viewer needs to watch through a machine to experience the desired effect.



Jim le Ferve of Nexus Productions writes:

In March 2007 at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London we hosted an evening of animation related events which I took as an opportunity to make some more examples of my Phonographantasmascope, noun
an extension of the Zoetrope principle.

It is all live action and works by using the shutter speed of the camera rather than the rather irritating stroboscope methods other 3D Zoetropes use.



Gijs Gieskes has made many wonderful machines from gameboys or other machines which he’s circuitbent.

He writes about the Acid Machine:

The circle with the lines that you see on the top of the machine, and rotates and displays the note you are playing.
When you play a C the lines in the middle circle will be standing still.. from the C it will go outward, displaying all notes on a keyboard in 12 steps.

It works by making a LED blink in the frequency of the sound, and rotating the image at a set speed.

more information here

(thanks, kevin!)








In the second video you can see how he can use foot pedals to change the chord.








In the second video you can see how he can use foot pedals to change the chord.








In the second video you can see how he can use foot pedals to change the chord.
An interesting variation of the zoetrope principle where the camera shutter is used instead of slits or strobes to freeze the motion. The downside (or potentially part of the attraction) is that the viewer needs to watch through a machine to experience the desired effect.




Jim le Ferve of Nexus Productions writes:

In March 2007 at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London we hosted an evening of animation related events which I took as an opportunity to make some more examples of my Phonographantasmascope, rx
an extension of the Zoetrope principle.

It is all live action and works by using the shutter speed of the camera rather than the rather irritating stroboscope methods other 3D Zoetropes use.








In the second video you can see how he can use foot pedals to change the chord.








In the second video you can see how he can use foot pedals to change the chord.
An interesting variation of the zoetrope principle where the camera shutter is used instead of slits or strobes to freeze the motion. The downside (or potentially part of the attraction) is that the viewer needs to watch through a machine to experience the desired effect.




Jim le Ferve of Nexus Productions writes:

In March 2007 at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London we hosted an evening of animation related events which I took as an opportunity to make some more examples of my Phonographantasmascope, rx
an extension of the Zoetrope principle.

It is all live action and works by using the shutter speed of the camera rather than the rather irritating stroboscope methods other 3D Zoetropes use.








In the second video you can see how he can use foot pedals to change the chord.
An interesting variation of the zoetrope principle where the camera shutter is used instead of slits or strobes to freeze the motion. The downside (or potentially part of the attraction) is that the viewer needs to watch through a machine to experience the desired effect.




Jim le Ferve of Nexus Productions writes:

In March 2007 at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London we hosted an evening of animation related events which I took as an opportunity to make some more examples of my Phonographantasmascope, rx
an extension of the Zoetrope principle.

It is all live action and works by using the shutter speed of the camera rather than the rather irritating stroboscope methods other 3D Zoetropes use.

An interesting variation of the zoetrope principle where the camera shutter is used instead of slits or strobes to freeze the motion. The downside (or potentially part of the attraction) is that the viewer needs to watch through a machine to experience the desired effect.

Jim le Ferve of Nexus Productions writes:

In March 2007 at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London we hosted an evening of animation related events which I took as an opportunity to make some more examples of my Phonographantasmascope, psychiatrist
an extension of the Zoetrope principle.

It is all live action and works by using the shutter speed of the camera rather than the rather irritating stroboscope methods other 3D Zoetropes use.








In the second video you can see how he can use foot pedals to change the chord.








In the second video you can see how he can use foot pedals to change the chord.
An interesting variation of the zoetrope principle where the camera shutter is used instead of slits or strobes to freeze the motion. The downside (or potentially part of the attraction) is that the viewer needs to watch through a machine to experience the desired effect.




Jim le Ferve of Nexus Productions writes:

In March 2007 at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London we hosted an evening of animation related events which I took as an opportunity to make some more examples of my Phonographantasmascope, rx
an extension of the Zoetrope principle.

It is all live action and works by using the shutter speed of the camera rather than the rather irritating stroboscope methods other 3D Zoetropes use.








In the second video you can see how he can use foot pedals to change the chord.
An interesting variation of the zoetrope principle where the camera shutter is used instead of slits or strobes to freeze the motion. The downside (or potentially part of the attraction) is that the viewer needs to watch through a machine to experience the desired effect.




Jim le Ferve of Nexus Productions writes:

In March 2007 at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London we hosted an evening of animation related events which I took as an opportunity to make some more examples of my Phonographantasmascope, rx
an extension of the Zoetrope principle.

It is all live action and works by using the shutter speed of the camera rather than the rather irritating stroboscope methods other 3D Zoetropes use.

An interesting variation of the zoetrope principle where the camera shutter is used instead of slits or strobes to freeze the motion. The downside (or potentially part of the attraction) is that the viewer needs to watch through a machine to experience the desired effect.

Jim le Ferve of Nexus Productions writes:

In March 2007 at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London we hosted an evening of animation related events which I took as an opportunity to make some more examples of my Phonographantasmascope, psychiatrist
an extension of the Zoetrope principle.

It is all live action and works by using the shutter speed of the camera rather than the rather irritating stroboscope methods other 3D Zoetropes use.








In the second video you can see how he can use foot pedals to change the chord.
An interesting variation of the zoetrope principle where the camera shutter is used instead of slits or strobes to freeze the motion. The downside (or potentially part of the attraction) is that the viewer needs to watch through a machine to experience the desired effect.




Jim le Ferve of Nexus Productions writes:

In March 2007 at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London we hosted an evening of animation related events which I took as an opportunity to make some more examples of my Phonographantasmascope, rx
an extension of the Zoetrope principle.

It is all live action and works by using the shutter speed of the camera rather than the rather irritating stroboscope methods other 3D Zoetropes use.

An interesting variation of the zoetrope principle where the camera shutter is used instead of slits or strobes to freeze the motion. The downside (or potentially part of the attraction) is that the viewer needs to watch through a machine to experience the desired effect.

Jim le Ferve of Nexus Productions writes:

In March 2007 at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London we hosted an evening of animation related events which I took as an opportunity to make some more examples of my Phonographantasmascope, psychiatrist
an extension of the Zoetrope principle.

It is all live action and works by using the shutter speed of the camera rather than the rather irritating stroboscope methods other 3D Zoetropes use.

An interesting variation of the zoetrope principle where the camera shutter is used instead of slits or strobes to freeze the motion. The downside (or potentially part of the attraction) is that the viewer needs to watch through a machine to experience the desired effect.

Jim le Ferve of Nexus Productions writes:

In March 2007 at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London we hosted an evening of animation related events which I took as an opportunity to make some more examples of my Phonographantasmascope, there
an extension of the Zoetrope principle.

It is all live action and works by using the shutter speed of the camera rather than the rather irritating stroboscope methods other 3D Zoetropes use.








In the second video you can see how he can use foot pedals to change the chord.








In the second video you can see how he can use foot pedals to change the chord.
An interesting variation of the zoetrope principle where the camera shutter is used instead of slits or strobes to freeze the motion. The downside (or potentially part of the attraction) is that the viewer needs to watch through a machine to experience the desired effect.




Jim le Ferve of Nexus Productions writes:

In March 2007 at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London we hosted an evening of animation related events which I took as an opportunity to make some more examples of my Phonographantasmascope, rx
an extension of the Zoetrope principle.

It is all live action and works by using the shutter speed of the camera rather than the rather irritating stroboscope methods other 3D Zoetropes use.








In the second video you can see how he can use foot pedals to change the chord.
An interesting variation of the zoetrope principle where the camera shutter is used instead of slits or strobes to freeze the motion. The downside (or potentially part of the attraction) is that the viewer needs to watch through a machine to experience the desired effect.




Jim le Ferve of Nexus Productions writes:

In March 2007 at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London we hosted an evening of animation related events which I took as an opportunity to make some more examples of my Phonographantasmascope, rx
an extension of the Zoetrope principle.

It is all live action and works by using the shutter speed of the camera rather than the rather irritating stroboscope methods other 3D Zoetropes use.

An interesting variation of the zoetrope principle where the camera shutter is used instead of slits or strobes to freeze the motion. The downside (or potentially part of the attraction) is that the viewer needs to watch through a machine to experience the desired effect.

Jim le Ferve of Nexus Productions writes:

In March 2007 at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London we hosted an evening of animation related events which I took as an opportunity to make some more examples of my Phonographantasmascope, psychiatrist
an extension of the Zoetrope principle.

It is all live action and works by using the shutter speed of the camera rather than the rather irritating stroboscope methods other 3D Zoetropes use.








In the second video you can see how he can use foot pedals to change the chord.
An interesting variation of the zoetrope principle where the camera shutter is used instead of slits or strobes to freeze the motion. The downside (or potentially part of the attraction) is that the viewer needs to watch through a machine to experience the desired effect.




Jim le Ferve of Nexus Productions writes:

In March 2007 at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London we hosted an evening of animation related events which I took as an opportunity to make some more examples of my Phonographantasmascope, rx
an extension of the Zoetrope principle.

It is all live action and works by using the shutter speed of the camera rather than the rather irritating stroboscope methods other 3D Zoetropes use.

An interesting variation of the zoetrope principle where the camera shutter is used instead of slits or strobes to freeze the motion. The downside (or potentially part of the attraction) is that the viewer needs to watch through a machine to experience the desired effect.

Jim le Ferve of Nexus Productions writes:

In March 2007 at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London we hosted an evening of animation related events which I took as an opportunity to make some more examples of my Phonographantasmascope, psychiatrist
an extension of the Zoetrope principle.

It is all live action and works by using the shutter speed of the camera rather than the rather irritating stroboscope methods other 3D Zoetropes use.

An interesting variation of the zoetrope principle where the camera shutter is used instead of slits or strobes to freeze the motion. The downside (or potentially part of the attraction) is that the viewer needs to watch through a machine to experience the desired effect.

Jim le Ferve of Nexus Productions writes:

In March 2007 at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London we hosted an evening of animation related events which I took as an opportunity to make some more examples of my Phonographantasmascope, there
an extension of the Zoetrope principle.

It is all live action and works by using the shutter speed of the camera rather than the rather irritating stroboscope methods other 3D Zoetropes use.








In the second video you can see how he can use foot pedals to change the chord.
An interesting variation of the zoetrope principle where the camera shutter is used instead of slits or strobes to freeze the motion. The downside (or potentially part of the attraction) is that the viewer needs to watch through a machine to experience the desired effect.




Jim le Ferve of Nexus Productions writes:

In March 2007 at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London we hosted an evening of animation related events which I took as an opportunity to make some more examples of my Phonographantasmascope, rx
an extension of the Zoetrope principle.

It is all live action and works by using the shutter speed of the camera rather than the rather irritating stroboscope methods other 3D Zoetropes use.

An interesting variation of the zoetrope principle where the camera shutter is used instead of slits or strobes to freeze the motion. The downside (or potentially part of the attraction) is that the viewer needs to watch through a machine to experience the desired effect.

Jim le Ferve of Nexus Productions writes:

In March 2007 at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London we hosted an evening of animation related events which I took as an opportunity to make some more examples of my Phonographantasmascope, psychiatrist
an extension of the Zoetrope principle.

It is all live action and works by using the shutter speed of the camera rather than the rather irritating stroboscope methods other 3D Zoetropes use.

An interesting variation of the zoetrope principle where the camera shutter is used instead of slits or strobes to freeze the motion. The downside (or potentially part of the attraction) is that the viewer needs to watch through a machine to experience the desired effect.

Jim le Ferve of Nexus Productions writes:

In March 2007 at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London we hosted an evening of animation related events which I took as an opportunity to make some more examples of my Phonographantasmascope, there
an extension of the Zoetrope principle.

It is all live action and works by using the shutter speed of the camera rather than the rather irritating stroboscope methods other 3D Zoetropes use.

An interesting variation of the zoetrope principle where the camera shutter is used instead of slits or strobes to freeze the motion. The downside (or potentially part of the attraction) is that the viewer needs to watch through a machine to experience the desired effect.



Jim le Ferve of Nexus Productions writes:

In March 2007 at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London we hosted an evening of animation related events which I took as an opportunity to make some more examples of my Phonographantasmascope, psychiatrist
an extension of the Zoetrope principle.

It is all live action and works by using the shutter speed of the camera rather than the rather irritating stroboscope methods other 3D Zoetropes use.








In the second video you can see how he can use foot pedals to change the chord.








In the second video you can see how he can use foot pedals to change the chord.
An interesting variation of the zoetrope principle where the camera shutter is used instead of slits or strobes to freeze the motion. The downside (or potentially part of the attraction) is that the viewer needs to watch through a machine to experience the desired effect.




Jim le Ferve of Nexus Productions writes:

In March 2007 at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London we hosted an evening of animation related events which I took as an opportunity to make some more examples of my Phonographantasmascope, rx
an extension of the Zoetrope principle.

It is all live action and works by using the shutter speed of the camera rather than the rather irritating stroboscope methods other 3D Zoetropes use.








In the second video you can see how he can use foot pedals to change the chord.
An interesting variation of the zoetrope principle where the camera shutter is used instead of slits or strobes to freeze the motion. The downside (or potentially part of the attraction) is that the viewer needs to watch through a machine to experience the desired effect.




Jim le Ferve of Nexus Productions writes:

In March 2007 at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London we hosted an evening of animation related events which I took as an opportunity to make some more examples of my Phonographantasmascope, rx
an extension of the Zoetrope principle.

It is all live action and works by using the shutter speed of the camera rather than the rather irritating stroboscope methods other 3D Zoetropes use.

An interesting variation of the zoetrope principle where the camera shutter is used instead of slits or strobes to freeze the motion. The downside (or potentially part of the attraction) is that the viewer needs to watch through a machine to experience the desired effect.

Jim le Ferve of Nexus Productions writes:

In March 2007 at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London we hosted an evening of animation related events which I took as an opportunity to make some more examples of my Phonographantasmascope, psychiatrist
an extension of the Zoetrope principle.

It is all live action and works by using the shutter speed of the camera rather than the rather irritating stroboscope methods other 3D Zoetropes use.








In the second video you can see how he can use foot pedals to change the chord.
An interesting variation of the zoetrope principle where the camera shutter is used instead of slits or strobes to freeze the motion. The downside (or potentially part of the attraction) is that the viewer needs to watch through a machine to experience the desired effect.




Jim le Ferve of Nexus Productions writes:

In March 2007 at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London we hosted an evening of animation related events which I took as an opportunity to make some more examples of my Phonographantasmascope, rx
an extension of the Zoetrope principle.

It is all live action and works by using the shutter speed of the camera rather than the rather irritating stroboscope methods other 3D Zoetropes use.

An interesting variation of the zoetrope principle where the camera shutter is used instead of slits or strobes to freeze the motion. The downside (or potentially part of the attraction) is that the viewer needs to watch through a machine to experience the desired effect.

Jim le Ferve of Nexus Productions writes:

In March 2007 at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London we hosted an evening of animation related events which I took as an opportunity to make some more examples of my Phonographantasmascope, psychiatrist
an extension of the Zoetrope principle.

It is all live action and works by using the shutter speed of the camera rather than the rather irritating stroboscope methods other 3D Zoetropes use.

An interesting variation of the zoetrope principle where the camera shutter is used instead of slits or strobes to freeze the motion. The downside (or potentially part of the attraction) is that the viewer needs to watch through a machine to experience the desired effect.

Jim le Ferve of Nexus Productions writes:

In March 2007 at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London we hosted an evening of animation related events which I took as an opportunity to make some more examples of my Phonographantasmascope, there
an extension of the Zoetrope principle.

It is all live action and works by using the shutter speed of the camera rather than the rather irritating stroboscope methods other 3D Zoetropes use.








In the second video you can see how he can use foot pedals to change the chord.
An interesting variation of the zoetrope principle where the camera shutter is used instead of slits or strobes to freeze the motion. The downside (or potentially part of the attraction) is that the viewer needs to watch through a machine to experience the desired effect.




Jim le Ferve of Nexus Productions writes:

In March 2007 at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London we hosted an evening of animation related events which I took as an opportunity to make some more examples of my Phonographantasmascope, rx
an extension of the Zoetrope principle.

It is all live action and works by using the shutter speed of the camera rather than the rather irritating stroboscope methods other 3D Zoetropes use.

An interesting variation of the zoetrope principle where the camera shutter is used instead of slits or strobes to freeze the motion. The downside (or potentially part of the attraction) is that the viewer needs to watch through a machine to experience the desired effect.

Jim le Ferve of Nexus Productions writes:

In March 2007 at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London we hosted an evening of animation related events which I took as an opportunity to make some more examples of my Phonographantasmascope, psychiatrist
an extension of the Zoetrope principle.

It is all live action and works by using the shutter speed of the camera rather than the rather irritating stroboscope methods other 3D Zoetropes use.

An interesting variation of the zoetrope principle where the camera shutter is used instead of slits or strobes to freeze the motion. The downside (or potentially part of the attraction) is that the viewer needs to watch through a machine to experience the desired effect.

Jim le Ferve of Nexus Productions writes:

In March 2007 at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London we hosted an evening of animation related events which I took as an opportunity to make some more examples of my Phonographantasmascope, there
an extension of the Zoetrope principle.

It is all live action and works by using the shutter speed of the camera rather than the rather irritating stroboscope methods other 3D Zoetropes use.

An interesting variation of the zoetrope principle where the camera shutter is used instead of slits or strobes to freeze the motion. The downside (or potentially part of the attraction) is that the viewer needs to watch through a machine to experience the desired effect.



Jim le Ferve of Nexus Productions writes:

In March 2007 at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London we hosted an evening of animation related events which I took as an opportunity to make some more examples of my Phonographantasmascope, psychiatrist
an extension of the Zoetrope principle.

It is all live action and works by using the shutter speed of the camera rather than the rather irritating stroboscope methods other 3D Zoetropes use.








In the second video you can see how he can use foot pedals to change the chord.
An interesting variation of the zoetrope principle where the camera shutter is used instead of slits or strobes to freeze the motion. The downside (or potentially part of the attraction) is that the viewer needs to watch through a machine to experience the desired effect.




Jim le Ferve of Nexus Productions writes:

In March 2007 at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London we hosted an evening of animation related events which I took as an opportunity to make some more examples of my Phonographantasmascope, rx
an extension of the Zoetrope principle.

It is all live action and works by using the shutter speed of the camera rather than the rather irritating stroboscope methods other 3D Zoetropes use.

An interesting variation of the zoetrope principle where the camera shutter is used instead of slits or strobes to freeze the motion. The downside (or potentially part of the attraction) is that the viewer needs to watch through a machine to experience the desired effect.

Jim le Ferve of Nexus Productions writes:

In March 2007 at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London we hosted an evening of animation related events which I took as an opportunity to make some more examples of my Phonographantasmascope, psychiatrist
an extension of the Zoetrope principle.

It is all live action and works by using the shutter speed of the camera rather than the rather irritating stroboscope methods other 3D Zoetropes use.

An interesting variation of the zoetrope principle where the camera shutter is used instead of slits or strobes to freeze the motion. The downside (or potentially part of the attraction) is that the viewer needs to watch through a machine to experience the desired effect.

Jim le Ferve of Nexus Productions writes:

In March 2007 at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London we hosted an evening of animation related events which I took as an opportunity to make some more examples of my Phonographantasmascope, there
an extension of the Zoetrope principle.

It is all live action and works by using the shutter speed of the camera rather than the rather irritating stroboscope methods other 3D Zoetropes use.

An interesting variation of the zoetrope principle where the camera shutter is used instead of slits or strobes to freeze the motion. The downside (or potentially part of the attraction) is that the viewer needs to watch through a machine to experience the desired effect.



Jim le Ferve of Nexus Productions writes:

In March 2007 at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London we hosted an evening of animation related events which I took as an opportunity to make some more examples of my Phonographantasmascope, psychiatrist
an extension of the Zoetrope principle.

It is all live action and works by using the shutter speed of the camera rather than the rather irritating stroboscope methods other 3D Zoetropes use.

An interesting variation of the zoetrope principle where the camera shutter is used instead of slits or strobes to freeze the motion. The downside (or potentially part of the attraction) is that the viewer needs to watch through a machine to experience the desired effect.



Jim le Ferve of Nexus Productions writes:

In March 2007 at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London we hosted an evening of animation related events which I took as an opportunity to make some more examples of my Phonographantasmascope, noun
an extension of the Zoetrope principle.

It is all live action and works by using the shutter speed of the camera rather than the rather irritating stroboscope methods other 3D Zoetropes use.








In the second video you can see how he can use foot pedals to change the chord.








In the second video you can see how he can use foot pedals to change the chord.
An interesting variation of the zoetrope principle where the camera shutter is used instead of slits or strobes to freeze the motion. The downside (or potentially part of the attraction) is that the viewer needs to watch through a machine to experience the desired effect.




Jim le Ferve of Nexus Productions writes:

In March 2007 at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London we hosted an evening of animation related events which I took as an opportunity to make some more examples of my Phonographantasmascope, rx
an extension of the Zoetrope principle.

It is all live action and works by using the shutter speed of the camera rather than the rather irritating stroboscope methods other 3D Zoetropes use.








In the second video you can see how he can use foot pedals to change the chord.
An interesting variation of the zoetrope principle where the camera shutter is used instead of slits or strobes to freeze the motion. The downside (or potentially part of the attraction) is that the viewer needs to watch through a machine to experience the desired effect.




Jim le Ferve of Nexus Productions writes:

In March 2007 at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London we hosted an evening of animation related events which I took as an opportunity to make some more examples of my Phonographantasmascope, rx
an extension of the Zoetrope principle.

It is all live action and works by using the shutter speed of the camera rather than the rather irritating stroboscope methods other 3D Zoetropes use.

An interesting variation of the zoetrope principle where the camera shutter is used instead of slits or strobes to freeze the motion. The downside (or potentially part of the attraction) is that the viewer needs to watch through a machine to experience the desired effect.

Jim le Ferve of Nexus Productions writes:

In March 2007 at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London we hosted an evening of animation related events which I took as an opportunity to make some more examples of my Phonographantasmascope, psychiatrist
an extension of the Zoetrope principle.

It is all live action and works by using the shutter speed of the camera rather than the rather irritating stroboscope methods other 3D Zoetropes use.








In the second video you can see how he can use foot pedals to change the chord.
An interesting variation of the zoetrope principle where the camera shutter is used instead of slits or strobes to freeze the motion. The downside (or potentially part of the attraction) is that the viewer needs to watch through a machine to experience the desired effect.




Jim le Ferve of Nexus Productions writes:

In March 2007 at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London we hosted an evening of animation related events which I took as an opportunity to make some more examples of my Phonographantasmascope, rx
an extension of the Zoetrope principle.

It is all live action and works by using the shutter speed of the camera rather than the rather irritating stroboscope methods other 3D Zoetropes use.

An interesting variation of the zoetrope principle where the camera shutter is used instead of slits or strobes to freeze the motion. The downside (or potentially part of the attraction) is that the viewer needs to watch through a machine to experience the desired effect.

Jim le Ferve of Nexus Productions writes:

In March 2007 at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London we hosted an evening of animation related events which I took as an opportunity to make some more examples of my Phonographantasmascope, psychiatrist
an extension of the Zoetrope principle.

It is all live action and works by using the shutter speed of the camera rather than the rather irritating stroboscope methods other 3D Zoetropes use.

An interesting variation of the zoetrope principle where the camera shutter is used instead of slits or strobes to freeze the motion. The downside (or potentially part of the attraction) is that the viewer needs to watch through a machine to experience the desired effect.

Jim le Ferve of Nexus Productions writes:

In March 2007 at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London we hosted an evening of animation related events which I took as an opportunity to make some more examples of my Phonographantasmascope, there
an extension of the Zoetrope principle.

It is all live action and works by using the shutter speed of the camera rather than the rather irritating stroboscope methods other 3D Zoetropes use.








In the second video you can see how he can use foot pedals to change the chord.
An interesting variation of the zoetrope principle where the camera shutter is used instead of slits or strobes to freeze the motion. The downside (or potentially part of the attraction) is that the viewer needs to watch through a machine to experience the desired effect.




Jim le Ferve of Nexus Productions writes:

In March 2007 at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London we hosted an evening of animation related events which I took as an opportunity to make some more examples of my Phonographantasmascope, rx
an extension of the Zoetrope principle.

It is all live action and works by using the shutter speed of the camera rather than the rather irritating stroboscope methods other 3D Zoetropes use.

An interesting variation of the zoetrope principle where the camera shutter is used instead of slits or strobes to freeze the motion. The downside (or potentially part of the attraction) is that the viewer needs to watch through a machine to experience the desired effect.

Jim le Ferve of Nexus Productions writes:

In March 2007 at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London we hosted an evening of animation related events which I took as an opportunity to make some more examples of my Phonographantasmascope, psychiatrist
an extension of the Zoetrope principle.

It is all live action and works by using the shutter speed of the camera rather than the rather irritating stroboscope methods other 3D Zoetropes use.

An interesting variation of the zoetrope principle where the camera shutter is used instead of slits or strobes to freeze the motion. The downside (or potentially part of the attraction) is that the viewer needs to watch through a machine to experience the desired effect.

Jim le Ferve of Nexus Productions writes:

In March 2007 at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London we hosted an evening of animation related events which I took as an opportunity to make some more examples of my Phonographantasmascope, there
an extension of the Zoetrope principle.

It is all live action and works by using the shutter speed of the camera rather than the rather irritating stroboscope methods other 3D Zoetropes use.

An interesting variation of the zoetrope principle where the camera shutter is used instead of slits or strobes to freeze the motion. The downside (or potentially part of the attraction) is that the viewer needs to watch through a machine to experience the desired effect.



Jim le Ferve of Nexus Productions writes:

In March 2007 at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London we hosted an evening of animation related events which I took as an opportunity to make some more examples of my Phonographantasmascope, psychiatrist
an extension of the Zoetrope principle.

It is all live action and works by using the shutter speed of the camera rather than the rather irritating stroboscope methods other 3D Zoetropes use.








In the second video you can see how he can use foot pedals to change the chord.
An interesting variation of the zoetrope principle where the camera shutter is used instead of slits or strobes to freeze the motion. The downside (or potentially part of the attraction) is that the viewer needs to watch through a machine to experience the desired effect.




Jim le Ferve of Nexus Productions writes:

In March 2007 at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London we hosted an evening of animation related events which I took as an opportunity to make some more examples of my Phonographantasmascope, rx
an extension of the Zoetrope principle.

It is all live action and works by using the shutter speed of the camera rather than the rather irritating stroboscope methods other 3D Zoetropes use.

An interesting variation of the zoetrope principle where the camera shutter is used instead of slits or strobes to freeze the motion. The downside (or potentially part of the attraction) is that the viewer needs to watch through a machine to experience the desired effect.

Jim le Ferve of Nexus Productions writes:

In March 2007 at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London we hosted an evening of animation related events which I took as an opportunity to make some more examples of my Phonographantasmascope, psychiatrist
an extension of the Zoetrope principle.

It is all live action and works by using the shutter speed of the camera rather than the rather irritating stroboscope methods other 3D Zoetropes use.

An interesting variation of the zoetrope principle where the camera shutter is used instead of slits or strobes to freeze the motion. The downside (or potentially part of the attraction) is that the viewer needs to watch through a machine to experience the desired effect.

Jim le Ferve of Nexus Productions writes:

In March 2007 at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London we hosted an evening of animation related events which I took as an opportunity to make some more examples of my Phonographantasmascope, there
an extension of the Zoetrope principle.

It is all live action and works by using the shutter speed of the camera rather than the rather irritating stroboscope methods other 3D Zoetropes use.

An interesting variation of the zoetrope principle where the camera shutter is used instead of slits or strobes to freeze the motion. The downside (or potentially part of the attraction) is that the viewer needs to watch through a machine to experience the desired effect.



Jim le Ferve of Nexus Productions writes:

In March 2007 at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London we hosted an evening of animation related events which I took as an opportunity to make some more examples of my Phonographantasmascope, psychiatrist
an extension of the Zoetrope principle.

It is all live action and works by using the shutter speed of the camera rather than the rather irritating stroboscope methods other 3D Zoetropes use.

An interesting variation of the zoetrope principle where the camera shutter is used instead of slits or strobes to freeze the motion. The downside (or potentially part of the attraction) is that the viewer needs to watch through a machine to experience the desired effect.



Jim le Ferve of Nexus Productions writes:

In March 2007 at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London we hosted an evening of animation related events which I took as an opportunity to make some more examples of my Phonographantasmascope, noun
an extension of the Zoetrope principle.

It is all live action and works by using the shutter speed of the camera rather than the rather irritating stroboscope methods other 3D Zoetropes use.



Gijs Gieskes has made many wonderful machines from gameboys or other machines which he’s circuitbent.

He writes about the Acid Machine:

The circle with the lines that you see on the top of the machine, and rotates and displays the note you are playing.
When you play a C the lines in the middle circle will be standing still.. from the C it will go outward, displaying all notes on a keyboard in 12 steps.

It works by making a LED blink in the frequency of the sound, and rotating the image at a set speed.

more information here

(thanks, kevin!)








In the second video you can see how he can use foot pedals to change the chord.








In the second video you can see how he can use foot pedals to change the chord.
An interesting variation of the zoetrope principle where the camera shutter is used instead of slits or strobes to freeze the motion. The downside (or potentially part of the attraction) is that the viewer needs to watch through a machine to experience the desired effect.




Jim le Ferve of Nexus Productions writes:

In March 2007 at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London we hosted an evening of animation related events which I took as an opportunity to make some more examples of my Phonographantasmascope, rx
an extension of the Zoetrope principle.

It is all live action and works by using the shutter speed of the camera rather than the rather irritating stroboscope methods other 3D Zoetropes use.








In the second video you can see how he can use foot pedals to change the chord.
An interesting variation of the zoetrope principle where the camera shutter is used instead of slits or strobes to freeze the motion. The downside (or potentially part of the attraction) is that the viewer needs to watch through a machine to experience the desired effect.




Jim le Ferve of Nexus Productions writes:

In March 2007 at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London we hosted an evening of animation related events which I took as an opportunity to make some more examples of my Phonographantasmascope, rx
an extension of the Zoetrope principle.

It is all live action and works by using the shutter speed of the camera rather than the rather irritating stroboscope methods other 3D Zoetropes use.

An interesting variation of the zoetrope principle where the camera shutter is used instead of slits or strobes to freeze the motion. The downside (or potentially part of the attraction) is that the viewer needs to watch through a machine to experience the desired effect.

Jim le Ferve of Nexus Productions writes:

In March 2007 at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London we hosted an evening of animation related events which I took as an opportunity to make some more examples of my Phonographantasmascope, psychiatrist
an extension of the Zoetrope principle.

It is all live action and works by using the shutter speed of the camera rather than the rather irritating stroboscope methods other 3D Zoetropes use.








In the second video you can see how he can use foot pedals to change the chord.
An interesting variation of the zoetrope principle where the camera shutter is used instead of slits or strobes to freeze the motion. The downside (or potentially part of the attraction) is that the viewer needs to watch through a machine to experience the desired effect.




Jim le Ferve of Nexus Productions writes:

In March 2007 at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London we hosted an evening of animation related events which I took as an opportunity to make some more examples of my Phonographantasmascope, rx
an extension of the Zoetrope principle.

It is all live action and works by using the shutter speed of the camera rather than the rather irritating stroboscope methods other 3D Zoetropes use.

An interesting variation of the zoetrope principle where the camera shutter is used instead of slits or strobes to freeze the motion. The downside (or potentially part of the attraction) is that the viewer needs to watch through a machine to experience the desired effect.

Jim le Ferve of Nexus Productions writes:

In March 2007 at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London we hosted an evening of animation related events which I took as an opportunity to make some more examples of my Phonographantasmascope, psychiatrist
an extension of the Zoetrope principle.

It is all live action and works by using the shutter speed of the camera rather than the rather irritating stroboscope methods other 3D Zoetropes use.

An interesting variation of the zoetrope principle where the camera shutter is used instead of slits or strobes to freeze the motion. The downside (or potentially part of the attraction) is that the viewer needs to watch through a machine to experience the desired effect.

Jim le Ferve of Nexus Productions writes:

In March 2007 at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London we hosted an evening of animation related events which I took as an opportunity to make some more examples of my Phonographantasmascope, there
an extension of the Zoetrope principle.

It is all live action and works by using the shutter speed of the camera rather than the rather irritating stroboscope methods other 3D Zoetropes use.








In the second video you can see how he can use foot pedals to change the chord.
An interesting variation of the zoetrope principle where the camera shutter is used instead of slits or strobes to freeze the motion. The downside (or potentially part of the attraction) is that the viewer needs to watch through a machine to experience the desired effect.




Jim le Ferve of Nexus Productions writes:

In March 2007 at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London we hosted an evening of animation related events which I took as an opportunity to make some more examples of my Phonographantasmascope, rx
an extension of the Zoetrope principle.

It is all live action and works by using the shutter speed of the camera rather than the rather irritating stroboscope methods other 3D Zoetropes use.

An interesting variation of the zoetrope principle where the camera shutter is used instead of slits or strobes to freeze the motion. The downside (or potentially part of the attraction) is that the viewer needs to watch through a machine to experience the desired effect.

Jim le Ferve of Nexus Productions writes:

In March 2007 at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London we hosted an evening of animation related events which I took as an opportunity to make some more examples of my Phonographantasmascope, psychiatrist
an extension of the Zoetrope principle.

It is all live action and works by using the shutter speed of the camera rather than the rather irritating stroboscope methods other 3D Zoetropes use.

An interesting variation of the zoetrope principle where the camera shutter is used instead of slits or strobes to freeze the motion. The downside (or potentially part of the attraction) is that the viewer needs to watch through a machine to experience the desired effect.

Jim le Ferve of Nexus Productions writes:

In March 2007 at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London we hosted an evening of animation related events which I took as an opportunity to make some more examples of my Phonographantasmascope, there
an extension of the Zoetrope principle.

It is all live action and works by using the shutter speed of the camera rather than the rather irritating stroboscope methods other 3D Zoetropes use.

An interesting variation of the zoetrope principle where the camera shutter is used instead of slits or strobes to freeze the motion. The downside (or potentially part of the attraction) is that the viewer needs to watch through a machine to experience the desired effect.



Jim le Ferve of Nexus Productions writes:

In March 2007 at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London we hosted an evening of animation related events which I took as an opportunity to make some more examples of my Phonographantasmascope, psychiatrist
an extension of the Zoetrope principle.

It is all live action and works by using the shutter speed of the camera rather than the rather irritating stroboscope methods other 3D Zoetropes use.








In the second video you can see how he can use foot pedals to change the chord.
An interesting variation of the zoetrope principle where the camera shutter is used instead of slits or strobes to freeze the motion. The downside (or potentially part of the attraction) is that the viewer needs to watch through a machine to experience the desired effect.




Jim le Ferve of Nexus Productions writes:

In March 2007 at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London we hosted an evening of animation related events which I took as an opportunity to make some more examples of my Phonographantasmascope, rx
an extension of the Zoetrope principle.

It is all live action and works by using the shutter speed of the camera rather than the rather irritating stroboscope methods other 3D Zoetropes use.

An interesting variation of the zoetrope principle where the camera shutter is used instead of slits or strobes to freeze the motion. The downside (or potentially part of the attraction) is that the viewer needs to watch through a machine to experience the desired effect.

Jim le Ferve of Nexus Productions writes:

In March 2007 at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London we hosted an evening of animation related events which I took as an opportunity to make some more examples of my Phonographantasmascope, psychiatrist
an extension of the Zoetrope principle.

It is all live action and works by using the shutter speed of the camera rather than the rather irritating stroboscope methods other 3D Zoetropes use.

An interesting variation of the zoetrope principle where the camera shutter is used instead of slits or strobes to freeze the motion. The downside (or potentially part of the attraction) is that the viewer needs to watch through a machine to experience the desired effect.

Jim le Ferve of Nexus Productions writes:

In March 2007 at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London we hosted an evening of animation related events which I took as an opportunity to make some more examples of my Phonographantasmascope, there
an extension of the Zoetrope principle.

It is all live action and works by using the shutter speed of the camera rather than the rather irritating stroboscope methods other 3D Zoetropes use.

An interesting variation of the zoetrope principle where the camera shutter is used instead of slits or strobes to freeze the motion. The downside (or potentially part of the attraction) is that the viewer needs to watch through a machine to experience the desired effect.



Jim le Ferve of Nexus Productions writes:

In March 2007 at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London we hosted an evening of animation related events which I took as an opportunity to make some more examples of my Phonographantasmascope, psychiatrist
an extension of the Zoetrope principle.

It is all live action and works by using the shutter speed of the camera rather than the rather irritating stroboscope methods other 3D Zoetropes use.

An interesting variation of the zoetrope principle where the camera shutter is used instead of slits or strobes to freeze the motion. The downside (or potentially part of the attraction) is that the viewer needs to watch through a machine to experience the desired effect.



Jim le Ferve of Nexus Productions writes:

In March 2007 at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London we hosted an evening of animation related events which I took as an opportunity to make some more examples of my Phonographantasmascope, noun
an extension of the Zoetrope principle.

It is all live action and works by using the shutter speed of the camera rather than the rather irritating stroboscope methods other 3D Zoetropes use.



Gijs Gieskes has made many wonderful machines from gameboys or other machines which he’s circuitbent.

He writes about the Acid Machine:

The circle with the lines that you see on the top of the machine, and rotates and displays the note you are playing.
When you play a C the lines in the middle circle will be standing still.. from the C it will go outward, displaying all notes on a keyboard in 12 steps.

It works by making a LED blink in the frequency of the sound, and rotating the image at a set speed.

more information here

(thanks, kevin!)


Gijs Gieskes has made many wonderful machines from gameboys or other machines which he’s circuitbent.

He writes about the Acid Machine:

The circle with the lines that you see on the top of the machine, abortion rotates and displays the note you are playing.
When you play a C the lines in the middle circle will be standing still.. from the C it will go outward, treatment displaying all notes on a keyboard in 12 steps.

It works by making a LED blink in the frequency of the sound, and rotating the image at a set speed.

more information here

(thanks, kevin!)








In the second video you can see how he can use foot pedals to change the chord.








In the second video you can see how he can use foot pedals to change the chord.








In the second video you can see how he can use foot pedals to change the chord.
An interesting variation of the zoetrope principle where the camera shutter is used instead of slits or strobes to freeze the motion. The downside (or potentially part of the attraction) is that the viewer needs to watch through a machine to experience the desired effect.




Jim le Ferve of Nexus Productions writes:

In March 2007 at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London we hosted an evening of animation related events which I took as an opportunity to make some more examples of my Phonographantasmascope, rx
an extension of the Zoetrope principle.

It is all live action and works by using the shutter speed of the camera rather than the rather irritating stroboscope methods other 3D Zoetropes use.








In the second video you can see how he can use foot pedals to change the chord.








In the second video you can see how he can use foot pedals to change the chord.
An interesting variation of the zoetrope principle where the camera shutter is used instead of slits or strobes to freeze the motion. The downside (or potentially part of the attraction) is that the viewer needs to watch through a machine to experience the desired effect.




Jim le Ferve of Nexus Productions writes:

In March 2007 at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London we hosted an evening of animation related events which I took as an opportunity to make some more examples of my Phonographantasmascope, rx
an extension of the Zoetrope principle.

It is all live action and works by using the shutter speed of the camera rather than the rather irritating stroboscope methods other 3D Zoetropes use.








In the second video you can see how he can use foot pedals to change the chord.
An interesting variation of the zoetrope principle where the camera shutter is used instead of slits or strobes to freeze the motion. The downside (or potentially part of the attraction) is that the viewer needs to watch through a machine to experience the desired effect.




Jim le Ferve of Nexus Productions writes:

In March 2007 at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London we hosted an evening of animation related events which I took as an opportunity to make some more examples of my Phonographantasmascope, rx
an extension of the Zoetrope principle.

It is all live action and works by using the shutter speed of the camera rather than the rather irritating stroboscope methods other 3D Zoetropes use.

An interesting variation of the zoetrope principle where the camera shutter is used instead of slits or strobes to freeze the motion. The downside (or potentially part of the attraction) is that the viewer needs to watch through a machine to experience the desired effect.

Jim le Ferve of Nexus Productions writes:

In March 2007 at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London we hosted an evening of animation related events which I took as an opportunity to make some more examples of my Phonographantasmascope, psychiatrist
an extension of the Zoetrope principle.

It is all live action and works by using the shutter speed of the camera rather than the rather irritating stroboscope methods other 3D Zoetropes use.








In the second video you can see how he can use foot pedals to change the chord.








In the second video you can see how he can use foot pedals to change the chord.
An interesting variation of the zoetrope principle where the camera shutter is used instead of slits or strobes to freeze the motion. The downside (or potentially part of the attraction) is that the viewer needs to watch through a machine to experience the desired effect.




Jim le Ferve of Nexus Productions writes:

In March 2007 at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London we hosted an evening of animation related events which I took as an opportunity to make some more examples of my Phonographantasmascope, rx
an extension of the Zoetrope principle.

It is all live action and works by using the shutter speed of the camera rather than the rather irritating stroboscope methods other 3D Zoetropes use.








In the second video you can see how he can use foot pedals to change the chord.
An interesting variation of the zoetrope principle where the camera shutter is used instead of slits or strobes to freeze the motion. The downside (or potentially part of the attraction) is that the viewer needs to watch through a machine to experience the desired effect.




Jim le Ferve of Nexus Productions writes:

In March 2007 at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London we hosted an evening of animation related events which I took as an opportunity to make some more examples of my Phonographantasmascope, rx
an extension of the Zoetrope principle.

It is all live action and works by using the shutter speed of the camera rather than the rather irritating stroboscope methods other 3D Zoetropes use.

An interesting variation of the zoetrope principle where the camera shutter is used instead of slits or strobes to freeze the motion. The downside (or potentially part of the attraction) is that the viewer needs to watch through a machine to experience the desired effect.

Jim le Ferve of Nexus Productions writes:

In March 2007 at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London we hosted an evening of animation related events which I took as an opportunity to make some more examples of my Phonographantasmascope, psychiatrist
an extension of the Zoetrope principle.

It is all live action and works by using the shutter speed of the camera rather than the rather irritating stroboscope methods other 3D Zoetropes use.








In the second video you can see how he can use foot pedals to change the chord.
An interesting variation of the zoetrope principle where the camera shutter is used instead of slits or strobes to freeze the motion. The downside (or potentially part of the attraction) is that the viewer needs to watch through a machine to experience the desired effect.




Jim le Ferve of Nexus Productions writes:

In March 2007 at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London we hosted an evening of animation related events which I took as an opportunity to make some more examples of my Phonographantasmascope, rx
an extension of the Zoetrope principle.

It is all live action and works by using the shutter speed of the camera rather than the rather irritating stroboscope methods other 3D Zoetropes use.

An interesting variation of the zoetrope principle where the camera shutter is used instead of slits or strobes to freeze the motion. The downside (or potentially part of the attraction) is that the viewer needs to watch through a machine to experience the desired effect.

Jim le Ferve of Nexus Productions writes:

In March 2007 at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London we hosted an evening of animation related events which I took as an opportunity to make some more examples of my Phonographantasmascope, psychiatrist
an extension of the Zoetrope principle.

It is all live action and works by using the shutter speed of the camera rather than the rather irritating stroboscope methods other 3D Zoetropes use.

An interesting variation of the zoetrope principle where the camera shutter is used instead of slits or strobes to freeze the motion. The downside (or potentially part of the attraction) is that the viewer needs to watch through a machine to experience the desired effect.

Jim le Ferve of Nexus Productions writes:

In March 2007 at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London we hosted an evening of animation related events which I took as an opportunity to make some more examples of my Phonographantasmascope, there
an extension of the Zoetrope principle.

It is all live action and works by using the shutter speed of the camera rather than the rather irritating stroboscope methods other 3D Zoetropes use.








In the second video you can see how he can use foot pedals to change the chord.








In the second video you can see how he can use foot pedals to change the chord.
An interesting variation of the zoetrope principle where the camera shutter is used instead of slits or strobes to freeze the motion. The downside (or potentially part of the attraction) is that the viewer needs to watch through a machine to experience the desired effect.




Jim le Ferve of Nexus Productions writes:

In March 2007 at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London we hosted an evening of animation related events which I took as an opportunity to make some more examples of my Phonographantasmascope, rx
an extension of the Zoetrope principle.

It is all live action and works by using the shutter speed of the camera rather than the rather irritating stroboscope methods other 3D Zoetropes use.








In the second video you can see how he can use foot pedals to change the chord.
An interesting variation of the zoetrope principle where the camera shutter is used instead of slits or strobes to freeze the motion. The downside (or potentially part of the attraction) is that the viewer needs to watch through a machine to experience the desired effect.




Jim le Ferve of Nexus Productions writes:

In March 2007 at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London we hosted an evening of animation related events which I took as an opportunity to make some more examples of my Phonographantasmascope, rx
an extension of the Zoetrope principle.

It is all live action and works by using the shutter speed of the camera rather than the rather irritating stroboscope methods other 3D Zoetropes use.

An interesting variation of the zoetrope principle where the camera shutter is used instead of slits or strobes to freeze the motion. The downside (or potentially part of the attraction) is that the viewer needs to watch through a machine to experience the desired effect.

Jim le Ferve of Nexus Productions writes:

In March 2007 at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London we hosted an evening of animation related events which I took as an opportunity to make some more examples of my Phonographantasmascope, psychiatrist
an extension of the Zoetrope principle.

It is all live action and works by using the shutter speed of the camera rather than the rather irritating stroboscope methods other 3D Zoetropes use.








In the second video you can see how he can use foot pedals to change the chord.
An interesting variation of the zoetrope principle where the camera shutter is used instead of slits or strobes to freeze the motion. The downside (or potentially part of the attraction) is that the viewer needs to watch through a machine to experience the desired effect.




Jim le Ferve of Nexus Productions writes:

In March 2007 at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London we hosted an evening of animation related events which I took as an opportunity to make some more examples of my Phonographantasmascope, rx
an extension of the Zoetrope principle.

It is all live action and works by using the shutter speed of the camera rather than the rather irritating stroboscope methods other 3D Zoetropes use.

An interesting variation of the zoetrope principle where the camera shutter is used instead of slits or strobes to freeze the motion. The downside (or potentially part of the attraction) is that the viewer needs to watch through a machine to experience the desired effect.

Jim le Ferve of Nexus Productions writes:

In March 2007 at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London we hosted an evening of animation related events which I took as an opportunity to make some more examples of my Phonographantasmascope, psychiatrist
an extension of the Zoetrope principle.

It is all live action and works by using the shutter speed of the camera rather than the rather irritating stroboscope methods other 3D Zoetropes use.

An interesting variation of the zoetrope principle where the camera shutter is used instead of slits or strobes to freeze the motion. The downside (or potentially part of the attraction) is that the viewer needs to watch through a machine to experience the desired effect.

Jim le Ferve of Nexus Productions writes:

In March 2007 at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London we hosted an evening of animation related events which I took as an opportunity to make some more examples of my Phonographantasmascope, there
an extension of the Zoetrope principle.

It is all live action and works by using the shutter speed of the camera rather than the rather irritating stroboscope methods other 3D Zoetropes use.








In the second video you can see how he can use foot pedals to change the chord.
An interesting variation of the zoetrope principle where the camera shutter is used instead of slits or strobes to freeze the motion. The downside (or potentially part of the attraction) is that the viewer needs to watch through a machine to experience the desired effect.




Jim le Ferve of Nexus Productions writes:

In March 2007 at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London we hosted an evening of animation related events which I took as an opportunity to make some more examples of my Phonographantasmascope, rx
an extension of the Zoetrope principle.

It is all live action and works by using the shutter speed of the camera rather than the rather irritating stroboscope methods other 3D Zoetropes use.

An interesting variation of the zoetrope principle where the camera shutter is used instead of slits or strobes to freeze the motion. The downside (or potentially part of the attraction) is that the viewer needs to watch through a machine to experience the desired effect.

Jim le Ferve of Nexus Productions writes:

In March 2007 at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London we hosted an evening of animation related events which I took as an opportunity to make some more examples of my Phonographantasmascope, psychiatrist
an extension of the Zoetrope principle.

It is all live action and works by using the shutter speed of the camera rather than the rather irritating stroboscope methods other 3D Zoetropes use.

An interesting variation of the zoetrope principle where the camera shutter is used instead of slits or strobes to freeze the motion. The downside (or potentially part of the attraction) is that the viewer needs to watch through a machine to experience the desired effect.

Jim le Ferve of Nexus Productions writes:

In March 2007 at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London we hosted an evening of animation related events which I took as an opportunity to make some more examples of my Phonographantasmascope, there
an extension of the Zoetrope principle.

It is all live action and works by using the shutter speed of the camera rather than the rather irritating stroboscope methods other 3D Zoetropes use.

An interesting variation of the zoetrope principle where the camera shutter is used instead of slits or strobes to freeze the motion. The downside (or potentially part of the attraction) is that the viewer needs to watch through a machine to experience the desired effect.



Jim le Ferve of Nexus Productions writes:

In March 2007 at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London we hosted an evening of animation related events which I took as an opportunity to make some more examples of my Phonographantasmascope, psychiatrist
an extension of the Zoetrope principle.

It is all live action and works by using the shutter speed of the camera rather than the rather irritating stroboscope methods other 3D Zoetropes use.








In the second video you can see how he can use foot pedals to change the chord.








In the second video you can see how he can use foot pedals to change the chord.
An interesting variation of the zoetrope principle where the camera shutter is used instead of slits or strobes to freeze the motion. The downside (or potentially part of the attraction) is that the viewer needs to watch through a machine to experience the desired effect.




Jim le Ferve of Nexus Productions writes:

In March 2007 at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London we hosted an evening of animation related events which I took as an opportunity to make some more examples of my Phonographantasmascope, rx
an extension of the Zoetrope principle.

It is all live action and works by using the shutter speed of the camera rather than the rather irritating stroboscope methods other 3D Zoetropes use.








In the second video you can see how he can use foot pedals to change the chord.
An interesting variation of the zoetrope principle where the camera shutter is used instead of slits or strobes to freeze the motion. The downside (or potentially part of the attraction) is that the viewer needs to watch through a machine to experience the desired effect.




Jim le Ferve of Nexus Productions writes:

In March 2007 at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London we hosted an evening of animation related events which I took as an opportunity to make some more examples of my Phonographantasmascope, rx
an extension of the Zoetrope principle.

It is all live action and works by using the shutter speed of the camera rather than the rather irritating stroboscope methods other 3D Zoetropes use.

An interesting variation of the zoetrope principle where the camera shutter is used instead of slits or strobes to freeze the motion. The downside (or potentially part of the attraction) is that the viewer needs to watch through a machine to experience the desired effect.

Jim le Ferve of Nexus Productions writes:

In March 2007 at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London we hosted an evening of animation related events which I took as an opportunity to make some more examples of my Phonographantasmascope, psychiatrist
an extension of the Zoetrope principle.

It is all live action and works by using the shutter speed of the camera rather than the rather irritating stroboscope methods other 3D Zoetropes use.








In the second video you can see how he can use foot pedals to change the chord.
An interesting variation of the zoetrope principle where the camera shutter is used instead of slits or strobes to freeze the motion. The downside (or potentially part of the attraction) is that the viewer needs to watch through a machine to experience the desired effect.




Jim le Ferve of Nexus Productions writes:

In March 2007 at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London we hosted an evening of animation related events which I took as an opportunity to make some more examples of my Phonographantasmascope, rx
an extension of the Zoetrope principle.

It is all live action and works by using the shutter speed of the camera rather than the rather irritating stroboscope methods other 3D Zoetropes use.

An interesting variation of the zoetrope principle where the camera shutter is used instead of slits or strobes to freeze the motion. The downside (or potentially part of the attraction) is that the viewer needs to watch through a machine to experience the desired effect.

Jim le Ferve of Nexus Productions writes:

In March 2007 at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London we hosted an evening of animation related events which I took as an opportunity to make some more examples of my Phonographantasmascope, psychiatrist
an extension of the Zoetrope principle.

It is all live action and works by using the shutter speed of the camera rather than the rather irritating stroboscope methods other 3D Zoetropes use.

An interesting variation of the zoetrope principle where the camera shutter is used instead of slits or strobes to freeze the motion. The downside (or potentially part of the attraction) is that the viewer needs to watch through a machine to experience the desired effect.

Jim le Ferve of Nexus Productions writes:

In March 2007 at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London we hosted an evening of animation related events which I took as an opportunity to make some more examples of my Phonographantasmascope, there
an extension of the Zoetrope principle.

It is all live action and works by using the shutter speed of the camera rather than the rather irritating stroboscope methods other 3D Zoetropes use.








In the second video you can see how he can use foot pedals to change the chord.
An interesting variation of the zoetrope principle where the camera shutter is used instead of slits or strobes to freeze the motion. The downside (or potentially part of the attraction) is that the viewer needs to watch through a machine to experience the desired effect.




Jim le Ferve of Nexus Productions writes:

In March 2007 at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London we hosted an evening of animation related events which I took as an opportunity to make some more examples of my Phonographantasmascope, rx
an extension of the Zoetrope principle.

It is all live action and works by using the shutter speed of the camera rather than the rather irritating stroboscope methods other 3D Zoetropes use.

An interesting variation of the zoetrope principle where the camera shutter is used instead of slits or strobes to freeze the motion. The downside (or potentially part of the attraction) is that the viewer needs to watch through a machine to experience the desired effect.

Jim le Ferve of Nexus Productions writes:

In March 2007 at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London we hosted an evening of animation related events which I took as an opportunity to make some more examples of my Phonographantasmascope, psychiatrist
an extension of the Zoetrope principle.

It is all live action and works by using the shutter speed of the camera rather than the rather irritating stroboscope methods other 3D Zoetropes use.

An interesting variation of the zoetrope principle where the camera shutter is used instead of slits or strobes to freeze the motion. The downside (or potentially part of the attraction) is that the viewer needs to watch through a machine to experience the desired effect.

Jim le Ferve of Nexus Productions writes:

In March 2007 at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London we hosted an evening of animation related events which I took as an opportunity to make some more examples of my Phonographantasmascope, there
an extension of the Zoetrope principle.

It is all live action and works by using the shutter speed of the camera rather than the rather irritating stroboscope methods other 3D Zoetropes use.

An interesting variation of the zoetrope principle where the camera shutter is used instead of slits or strobes to freeze the motion. The downside (or potentially part of the attraction) is that the viewer needs to watch through a machine to experience the desired effect.



Jim le Ferve of Nexus Productions writes:

In March 2007 at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London we hosted an evening of animation related events which I took as an opportunity to make some more examples of my Phonographantasmascope, psychiatrist
an extension of the Zoetrope principle.

It is all live action and works by using the shutter speed of the camera rather than the rather irritating stroboscope methods other 3D Zoetropes use.








In the second video you can see how he can use foot pedals to change the chord.
An interesting variation of the zoetrope principle where the camera shutter is used instead of slits or strobes to freeze the motion. The downside (or potentially part of the attraction) is that the viewer needs to watch through a machine to experience the desired effect.




Jim le Ferve of Nexus Productions writes:

In March 2007 at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London we hosted an evening of animation related events which I took as an opportunity to make some more examples of my Phonographantasmascope, rx
an extension of the Zoetrope principle.

It is all live action and works by using the shutter speed of the camera rather than the rather irritating stroboscope methods other 3D Zoetropes use.

An interesting variation of the zoetrope principle where the camera shutter is used instead of slits or strobes to freeze the motion. The downside (or potentially part of the attraction) is that the viewer needs to watch through a machine to experience the desired effect.

Jim le Ferve of Nexus Productions writes:

In March 2007 at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London we hosted an evening of animation related events which I took as an opportunity to make some more examples of my Phonographantasmascope, psychiatrist
an extension of the Zoetrope principle.

It is all live action and works by using the shutter speed of the camera rather than the rather irritating stroboscope methods other 3D Zoetropes use.

An interesting variation of the zoetrope principle where the camera shutter is used instead of slits or strobes to freeze the motion. The downside (or potentially part of the attraction) is that the viewer needs to watch through a machine to experience the desired effect.

Jim le Ferve of Nexus Productions writes:

In March 2007 at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London we hosted an evening of animation related events which I took as an opportunity to make some more examples of my Phonographantasmascope, there
an extension of the Zoetrope principle.

It is all live action and works by using the shutter speed of the camera rather than the rather irritating stroboscope methods other 3D Zoetropes use.

An interesting variation of the zoetrope principle where the camera shutter is used instead of slits or strobes to freeze the motion. The downside (or potentially part of the attraction) is that the viewer needs to watch through a machine to experience the desired effect.



Jim le Ferve of Nexus Productions writes:

In March 2007 at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London we hosted an evening of animation related events which I took as an opportunity to make some more examples of my Phonographantasmascope, psychiatrist
an extension of the Zoetrope principle.

It is all live action and works by using the shutter speed of the camera rather than the rather irritating stroboscope methods other 3D Zoetropes use.

An interesting variation of the zoetrope principle where the camera shutter is used instead of slits or strobes to freeze the motion. The downside (or potentially part of the attraction) is that the viewer needs to watch through a machine to experience the desired effect.



Jim le Ferve of Nexus Productions writes:

In March 2007 at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London we hosted an evening of animation related events which I took as an opportunity to make some more examples of my Phonographantasmascope, noun
an extension of the Zoetrope principle.

It is all live action and works by using the shutter speed of the camera rather than the rather irritating stroboscope methods other 3D Zoetropes use.








In the second video you can see how he can use foot pedals to change the chord.








In the second video you can see how he can use foot pedals to change the chord.
An interesting variation of the zoetrope principle where the camera shutter is used instead of slits or strobes to freeze the motion. The downside (or potentially part of the attraction) is that the viewer needs to watch through a machine to experience the desired effect.




Jim le Ferve of Nexus Productions writes:

In March 2007 at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London we hosted an evening of animation related events which I took as an opportunity to make some more examples of my Phonographantasmascope, rx
an extension of the Zoetrope principle.

It is all live action and works by using the shutter speed of the camera rather than the rather irritating stroboscope methods other 3D Zoetropes use.








In the second video you can see how he can use foot pedals to change the chord.
An interesting variation of the zoetrope principle where the camera shutter is used instead of slits or strobes to freeze the motion. The downside (or potentially part of the attraction) is that the viewer needs to watch through a machine to experience the desired effect.




Jim le Ferve of Nexus Productions writes:

In March 2007 at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London we hosted an evening of animation related events which I took as an opportunity to make some more examples of my Phonographantasmascope, rx
an extension of the Zoetrope principle.

It is all live action and works by using the shutter speed of the camera rather than the rather irritating stroboscope methods other 3D Zoetropes use.

An interesting variation of the zoetrope principle where the camera shutter is used instead of slits or strobes to freeze the motion. The downside (or potentially part of the attraction) is that the viewer needs to watch through a machine to experience the desired effect.

Jim le Ferve of Nexus Productions writes:

In March 2007 at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London we hosted an evening of animation related events which I took as an opportunity to make some more examples of my Phonographantasmascope, psychiatrist
an extension of the Zoetrope principle.

It is all live action and works by using the shutter speed of the camera rather than the rather irritating stroboscope methods other 3D Zoetropes use.








In the second video you can see how he can use foot pedals to change the chord.
An interesting variation of the zoetrope principle where the camera shutter is used instead of slits or strobes to freeze the motion. The downside (or potentially part of the attraction) is that the viewer needs to watch through a machine to experience the desired effect.




Jim le Ferve of Nexus Productions writes:

In March 2007 at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London we hosted an evening of animation related events which I took as an opportunity to make some more examples of my Phonographantasmascope, rx
an extension of the Zoetrope principle.

It is all live action and works by using the shutter speed of the camera rather than the rather irritating stroboscope methods other 3D Zoetropes use.

An interesting variation of the zoetrope principle where the camera shutter is used instead of slits or strobes to freeze the motion. The downside (or potentially part of the attraction) is that the viewer needs to watch through a machine to experience the desired effect.

Jim le Ferve of Nexus Productions writes:

In March 2007 at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London we hosted an evening of animation related events which I took as an opportunity to make some more examples of my Phonographantasmascope, psychiatrist
an extension of the Zoetrope principle.

It is all live action and works by using the shutter speed of the camera rather than the rather irritating stroboscope methods other 3D Zoetropes use.

An interesting variation of the zoetrope principle where the camera shutter is used instead of slits or strobes to freeze the motion. The downside (or potentially part of the attraction) is that the viewer needs to watch through a machine to experience the desired effect.

Jim le Ferve of Nexus Productions writes:

In March 2007 at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London we hosted an evening of animation related events which I took as an opportunity to make some more examples of my Phonographantasmascope, there
an extension of the Zoetrope principle.

It is all live action and works by using the shutter speed of the camera rather than the rather irritating stroboscope methods other 3D Zoetropes use.








In the second video you can see how he can use foot pedals to change the chord.
An interesting variation of the zoetrope principle where the camera shutter is used instead of slits or strobes to freeze the motion. The downside (or potentially part of the attraction) is that the viewer needs to watch through a machine to experience the desired effect.




Jim le Ferve of Nexus Productions writes:

In March 2007 at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London we hosted an evening of animation related events which I took as an opportunity to make some more examples of my Phonographantasmascope, rx
an extension of the Zoetrope principle.

It is all live action and works by using the shutter speed of the camera rather than the rather irritating stroboscope methods other 3D Zoetropes use.

An interesting variation of the zoetrope principle where the camera shutter is used instead of slits or strobes to freeze the motion. The downside (or potentially part of the attraction) is that the viewer needs to watch through a machine to experience the desired effect.

Jim le Ferve of Nexus Productions writes:

In March 2007 at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London we hosted an evening of animation related events which I took as an opportunity to make some more examples of my Phonographantasmascope, psychiatrist
an extension of the Zoetrope principle.

It is all live action and works by using the shutter speed of the camera rather than the rather irritating stroboscope methods other 3D Zoetropes use.

An interesting variation of the zoetrope principle where the camera shutter is used instead of slits or strobes to freeze the motion. The downside (or potentially part of the attraction) is that the viewer needs to watch through a machine to experience the desired effect.

Jim le Ferve of Nexus Productions writes:

In March 2007 at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London we hosted an evening of animation related events which I took as an opportunity to make some more examples of my Phonographantasmascope, there
an extension of the Zoetrope principle.

It is all live action and works by using the shutter speed of the camera rather than the rather irritating stroboscope methods other 3D Zoetropes use.

An interesting variation of the zoetrope principle where the camera shutter is used instead of slits or strobes to freeze the motion. The downside (or potentially part of the attraction) is that the viewer needs to watch through a machine to experience the desired effect.



Jim le Ferve of Nexus Productions writes:

In March 2007 at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London we hosted an evening of animation related events which I took as an opportunity to make some more examples of my Phonographantasmascope, psychiatrist
an extension of the Zoetrope principle.

It is all live action and works by using the shutter speed of the camera rather than the rather irritating stroboscope methods other 3D Zoetropes use.








In the second video you can see how he can use foot pedals to change the chord.
An interesting variation of the zoetrope principle where the camera shutter is used instead of slits or strobes to freeze the motion. The downside (or potentially part of the attraction) is that the viewer needs to watch through a machine to experience the desired effect.




Jim le Ferve of Nexus Productions writes:

In March 2007 at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London we hosted an evening of animation related events which I took as an opportunity to make some more examples of my Phonographantasmascope, rx
an extension of the Zoetrope principle.

It is all live action and works by using the shutter speed of the camera rather than the rather irritating stroboscope methods other 3D Zoetropes use.

An interesting variation of the zoetrope principle where the camera shutter is used instead of slits or strobes to freeze the motion. The downside (or potentially part of the attraction) is that the viewer needs to watch through a machine to experience the desired effect.

Jim le Ferve of Nexus Productions writes:

In March 2007 at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London we hosted an evening of animation related events which I took as an opportunity to make some more examples of my Phonographantasmascope, psychiatrist
an extension of the Zoetrope principle.

It is all live action and works by using the shutter speed of the camera rather than the rather irritating stroboscope methods other 3D Zoetropes use.

An interesting variation of the zoetrope principle where the camera shutter is used instead of slits or strobes to freeze the motion. The downside (or potentially part of the attraction) is that the viewer needs to watch through a machine to experience the desired effect.

Jim le Ferve of Nexus Productions writes:

In March 2007 at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London we hosted an evening of animation related events which I took as an opportunity to make some more examples of my Phonographantasmascope, there
an extension of the Zoetrope principle.

It is all live action and works by using the shutter speed of the camera rather than the rather irritating stroboscope methods other 3D Zoetropes use.

An interesting variation of the zoetrope principle where the camera shutter is used instead of slits or strobes to freeze the motion. The downside (or potentially part of the attraction) is that the viewer needs to watch through a machine to experience the desired effect.



Jim le Ferve of Nexus Productions writes:

In March 2007 at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London we hosted an evening of animation related events which I took as an opportunity to make some more examples of my Phonographantasmascope, psychiatrist
an extension of the Zoetrope principle.

It is all live action and works by using the shutter speed of the camera rather than the rather irritating stroboscope methods other 3D Zoetropes use.

An interesting variation of the zoetrope principle where the camera shutter is used instead of slits or strobes to freeze the motion. The downside (or potentially part of the attraction) is that the viewer needs to watch through a machine to experience the desired effect.



Jim le Ferve of Nexus Productions writes:

In March 2007 at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London we hosted an evening of animation related events which I took as an opportunity to make some more examples of my Phonographantasmascope, noun
an extension of the Zoetrope principle.

It is all live action and works by using the shutter speed of the camera rather than the rather irritating stroboscope methods other 3D Zoetropes use.



Gijs Gieskes has made many wonderful machines from gameboys or other machines which he’s circuitbent.

He writes about the Acid Machine:

The circle with the lines that you see on the top of the machine, and rotates and displays the note you are playing.
When you play a C the lines in the middle circle will be standing still.. from the C it will go outward, displaying all notes on a keyboard in 12 steps.

It works by making a LED blink in the frequency of the sound, and rotating the image at a set speed.

more information here

(thanks, kevin!)








In the second video you can see how he can use foot pedals to change the chord.








In the second video you can see how he can use foot pedals to change the chord.
An interesting variation of the zoetrope principle where the camera shutter is used instead of slits or strobes to freeze the motion. The downside (or potentially part of the attraction) is that the viewer needs to watch through a machine to experience the desired effect.




Jim le Ferve of Nexus Productions writes:

In March 2007 at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London we hosted an evening of animation related events which I took as an opportunity to make some more examples of my Phonographantasmascope, rx
an extension of the Zoetrope principle.

It is all live action and works by using the shutter speed of the camera rather than the rather irritating stroboscope methods other 3D Zoetropes use.








In the second video you can see how he can use foot pedals to change the chord.
An interesting variation of the zoetrope principle where the camera shutter is used instead of slits or strobes to freeze the motion. The downside (or potentially part of the attraction) is that the viewer needs to watch through a machine to experience the desired effect.




Jim le Ferve of Nexus Productions writes:

In March 2007 at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London we hosted an evening of animation related events which I took as an opportunity to make some more examples of my Phonographantasmascope, rx
an extension of the Zoetrope principle.

It is all live action and works by using the shutter speed of the camera rather than the rather irritating stroboscope methods other 3D Zoetropes use.

An interesting variation of the zoetrope principle where the camera shutter is used instead of slits or strobes to freeze the motion. The downside (or potentially part of the attraction) is that the viewer needs to watch through a machine to experience the desired effect.

Jim le Ferve of Nexus Productions writes:

In March 2007 at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London we hosted an evening of animation related events which I took as an opportunity to make some more examples of my Phonographantasmascope, psychiatrist
an extension of the Zoetrope principle.

It is all live action and works by using the shutter speed of the camera rather than the rather irritating stroboscope methods other 3D Zoetropes use.








In the second video you can see how he can use foot pedals to change the chord.
An interesting variation of the zoetrope principle where the camera shutter is used instead of slits or strobes to freeze the motion. The downside (or potentially part of the attraction) is that the viewer needs to watch through a machine to experience the desired effect.




Jim le Ferve of Nexus Productions writes:

In March 2007 at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London we hosted an evening of animation related events which I took as an opportunity to make some more examples of my Phonographantasmascope, rx
an extension of the Zoetrope principle.

It is all live action and works by using the shutter speed of the camera rather than the rather irritating stroboscope methods other 3D Zoetropes use.

An interesting variation of the zoetrope principle where the camera shutter is used instead of slits or strobes to freeze the motion. The downside (or potentially part of the attraction) is that the viewer needs to watch through a machine to experience the desired effect.

Jim le Ferve of Nexus Productions writes:

In March 2007 at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London we hosted an evening of animation related events which I took as an opportunity to make some more examples of my Phonographantasmascope, psychiatrist
an extension of the Zoetrope principle.

It is all live action and works by using the shutter speed of the camera rather than the rather irritating stroboscope methods other 3D Zoetropes use.

An interesting variation of the zoetrope principle where the camera shutter is used instead of slits or strobes to freeze the motion. The downside (or potentially part of the attraction) is that the viewer needs to watch through a machine to experience the desired effect.

Jim le Ferve of Nexus Productions writes:

In March 2007 at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London we hosted an evening of animation related events which I took as an opportunity to make some more examples of my Phonographantasmascope, there
an extension of the Zoetrope principle.

It is all live action and works by using the shutter speed of the camera rather than the rather irritating stroboscope methods other 3D Zoetropes use.








In the second video you can see how he can use foot pedals to change the chord.
An interesting variation of the zoetrope principle where the camera shutter is used instead of slits or strobes to freeze the motion. The downside (or potentially part of the attraction) is that the viewer needs to watch through a machine to experience the desired effect.




Jim le Ferve of Nexus Productions writes:

In March 2007 at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London we hosted an evening of animation related events which I took as an opportunity to make some more examples of my Phonographantasmascope, rx
an extension of the Zoetrope principle.

It is all live action and works by using the shutter speed of the camera rather than the rather irritating stroboscope methods other 3D Zoetropes use.

An interesting variation of the zoetrope principle where the camera shutter is used instead of slits or strobes to freeze the motion. The downside (or potentially part of the attraction) is that the viewer needs to watch through a machine to experience the desired effect.

Jim le Ferve of Nexus Productions writes:

In March 2007 at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London we hosted an evening of animation related events which I took as an opportunity to make some more examples of my Phonographantasmascope, psychiatrist
an extension of the Zoetrope principle.

It is all live action and works by using the shutter speed of the camera rather than the rather irritating stroboscope methods other 3D Zoetropes use.

An interesting variation of the zoetrope principle where the camera shutter is used instead of slits or strobes to freeze the motion. The downside (or potentially part of the attraction) is that the viewer needs to watch through a machine to experience the desired effect.

Jim le Ferve of Nexus Productions writes:

In March 2007 at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London we hosted an evening of animation related events which I took as an opportunity to make some more examples of my Phonographantasmascope, there
an extension of the Zoetrope principle.

It is all live action and works by using the shutter speed of the camera rather than the rather irritating stroboscope methods other 3D Zoetropes use.

An interesting variation of the zoetrope principle where the camera shutter is used instead of slits or strobes to freeze the motion. The downside (or potentially part of the attraction) is that the viewer needs to watch through a machine to experience the desired effect.



Jim le Ferve of Nexus Productions writes:

In March 2007 at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London we hosted an evening of animation related events which I took as an opportunity to make some more examples of my Phonographantasmascope, psychiatrist
an extension of the Zoetrope principle.

It is all live action and works by using the shutter speed of the camera rather than the rather irritating stroboscope methods other 3D Zoetropes use.








In the second video you can see how he can use foot pedals to change the chord.
An interesting variation of the zoetrope principle where the camera shutter is used instead of slits or strobes to freeze the motion. The downside (or potentially part of the attraction) is that the viewer needs to watch through a machine to experience the desired effect.




Jim le Ferve of Nexus Productions writes:

In March 2007 at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London we hosted an evening of animation related events which I took as an opportunity to make some more examples of my Phonographantasmascope, rx
an extension of the Zoetrope principle.

It is all live action and works by using the shutter speed of the camera rather than the rather irritating stroboscope methods other 3D Zoetropes use.

An interesting variation of the zoetrope principle where the camera shutter is used instead of slits or strobes to freeze the motion. The downside (or potentially part of the attraction) is that the viewer needs to watch through a machine to experience the desired effect.

Jim le Ferve of Nexus Productions writes:

In March 2007 at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London we hosted an evening of animation related events which I took as an opportunity to make some more examples of my Phonographantasmascope, psychiatrist
an extension of the Zoetrope principle.

It is all live action and works by using the shutter speed of the camera rather than the rather irritating stroboscope methods other 3D Zoetropes use.

An interesting variation of the zoetrope principle where the camera shutter is used instead of slits or strobes to freeze the motion. The downside (or potentially part of the attraction) is that the viewer needs to watch through a machine to experience the desired effect.

Jim le Ferve of Nexus Productions writes:

In March 2007 at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London we hosted an evening of animation related events which I took as an opportunity to make some more examples of my Phonographantasmascope, there
an extension of the Zoetrope principle.

It is all live action and works by using the shutter speed of the camera rather than the rather irritating stroboscope methods other 3D Zoetropes use.

An interesting variation of the zoetrope principle where the camera shutter is used instead of slits or strobes to freeze the motion. The downside (or potentially part of the attraction) is that the viewer needs to watch through a machine to experience the desired effect.



Jim le Ferve of Nexus Productions writes:

In March 2007 at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London we hosted an evening of animation related events which I took as an opportunity to make some more examples of my Phonographantasmascope, psychiatrist
an extension of the Zoetrope principle.

It is all live action and works by using the shutter speed of the camera rather than the rather irritating stroboscope methods other 3D Zoetropes use.

An interesting variation of the zoetrope principle where the camera shutter is used instead of slits or strobes to freeze the motion. The downside (or potentially part of the attraction) is that the viewer needs to watch through a machine to experience the desired effect.



Jim le Ferve of Nexus Productions writes:

In March 2007 at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London we hosted an evening of animation related events which I took as an opportunity to make some more examples of my Phonographantasmascope, noun
an extension of the Zoetrope principle.

It is all live action and works by using the shutter speed of the camera rather than the rather irritating stroboscope methods other 3D Zoetropes use.



Gijs Gieskes has made many wonderful machines from gameboys or other machines which he’s circuitbent.

He writes about the Acid Machine:

The circle with the lines that you see on the top of the machine, and rotates and displays the note you are playing.
When you play a C the lines in the middle circle will be standing still.. from the C it will go outward, displaying all notes on a keyboard in 12 steps.

It works by making a LED blink in the frequency of the sound, and rotating the image at a set speed.

more information here

(thanks, kevin!)


Gijs Gieskes has made many wonderful machines from gameboys or other machines which he’s circuitbent.

He writes about the Acid Machine:

The circle with the lines that you see on the top of the machine, abortion rotates and displays the note you are playing.
When you play a C the lines in the middle circle will be standing still.. from the C it will go outward, treatment displaying all notes on a keyboard in 12 steps.

It works by making a LED blink in the frequency of the sound, and rotating the image at a set speed.

more information here

(thanks, kevin!)








In the second video you can see how he can use foot pedals to change the chord.








In the second video you can see how he can use foot pedals to change the chord.
An interesting variation of the zoetrope principle where the camera shutter is used instead of slits or strobes to freeze the motion. The downside (or potentially part of the attraction) is that the viewer needs to watch through a machine to experience the desired effect.




Jim le Ferve of Nexus Productions writes:

In March 2007 at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London we hosted an evening of animation related events which I took as an opportunity to make some more examples of my Phonographantasmascope, rx
an extension of the Zoetrope principle.

It is all live action and works by using the shutter speed of the camera rather than the rather irritating stroboscope methods other 3D Zoetropes use.








In the second video you can see how he can use foot pedals to change the chord.
An interesting variation of the zoetrope principle where the camera shutter is used instead of slits or strobes to freeze the motion. The downside (or potentially part of the attraction) is that the viewer needs to watch through a machine to experience the desired effect.




Jim le Ferve of Nexus Productions writes:

In March 2007 at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London we hosted an evening of animation related events which I took as an opportunity to make some more examples of my Phonographantasmascope, rx
an extension of the Zoetrope principle.

It is all live action and works by using the shutter speed of the camera rather than the rather irritating stroboscope methods other 3D Zoetropes use.

An interesting variation of the zoetrope principle where the camera shutter is used instead of slits or strobes to freeze the motion. The downside (or potentially part of the attraction) is that the viewer needs to watch through a machine to experience the desired effect.

Jim le Ferve of Nexus Productions writes:

In March 2007 at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London we hosted an evening of animation related events which I took as an opportunity to make some more examples of my Phonographantasmascope, psychiatrist
an extension of the Zoetrope principle.

It is all live action and works by using the shutter speed of the camera rather than the rather irritating stroboscope methods other 3D Zoetropes use.








In the second video you can see how he can use foot pedals to change the chord.
An interesting variation of the zoetrope principle where the camera shutter is used instead of slits or strobes to freeze the motion. The downside (or potentially part of the attraction) is that the viewer needs to watch through a machine to experience the desired effect.




Jim le Ferve of Nexus Productions writes:

In March 2007 at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London we hosted an evening of animation related events which I took as an opportunity to make some more examples of my Phonographantasmascope, rx
an extension of the Zoetrope principle.

It is all live action and works by using the shutter speed of the camera rather than the rather irritating stroboscope methods other 3D Zoetropes use.

An interesting variation of the zoetrope principle where the camera shutter is used instead of slits or strobes to freeze the motion. The downside (or potentially part of the attraction) is that the viewer needs to watch through a machine to experience the desired effect.

Jim le Ferve of Nexus Productions writes:

In March 2007 at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London we hosted an evening of animation related events which I took as an opportunity to make some more examples of my Phonographantasmascope, psychiatrist
an extension of the Zoetrope principle.

It is all live action and works by using the shutter speed of the camera rather than the rather irritating stroboscope methods other 3D Zoetropes use.

An interesting variation of the zoetrope principle where the camera shutter is used instead of slits or strobes to freeze the motion. The downside (or potentially part of the attraction) is that the viewer needs to watch through a machine to experience the desired effect.

Jim le Ferve of Nexus Productions writes:

In March 2007 at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London we hosted an evening of animation related events which I took as an opportunity to make some more examples of my Phonographantasmascope, there
an extension of the Zoetrope principle.

It is all live action and works by using the shutter speed of the camera rather than the rather irritating stroboscope methods other 3D Zoetropes use.








In the second video you can see how he can use foot pedals to change the chord.
An interesting variation of the zoetrope principle where the camera shutter is used instead of slits or strobes to freeze the motion. The downside (or potentially part of the attraction) is that the viewer needs to watch through a machine to experience the desired effect.




Jim le Ferve of Nexus Productions writes:

In March 2007 at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London we hosted an evening of animation related events which I took as an opportunity to make some more examples of my Phonographantasmascope, rx
an extension of the Zoetrope principle.

It is all live action and works by using the shutter speed of the camera rather than the rather irritating stroboscope methods other 3D Zoetropes use.

An interesting variation of the zoetrope principle where the camera shutter is used instead of slits or strobes to freeze the motion. The downside (or potentially part of the attraction) is that the viewer needs to watch through a machine to experience the desired effect.

Jim le Ferve of Nexus Productions writes:

In March 2007 at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London we hosted an evening of animation related events which I took as an opportunity to make some more examples of my Phonographantasmascope, psychiatrist
an extension of the Zoetrope principle.

It is all live action and works by using the shutter speed of the camera rather than the rather irritating stroboscope methods other 3D Zoetropes use.

An interesting variation of the zoetrope principle where the camera shutter is used instead of slits or strobes to freeze the motion. The downside (or potentially part of the attraction) is that the viewer needs to watch through a machine to experience the desired effect.

Jim le Ferve of Nexus Productions writes:

In March 2007 at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London we hosted an evening of animation related events which I took as an opportunity to make some more examples of my Phonographantasmascope, there
an extension of the Zoetrope principle.

It is all live action and works by using the shutter speed of the camera rather than the rather irritating stroboscope methods other 3D Zoetropes use.

An interesting variation of the zoetrope principle where the camera shutter is used instead of slits or strobes to freeze the motion. The downside (or potentially part of the attraction) is that the viewer needs to watch through a machine to experience the desired effect.



Jim le Ferve of Nexus Productions writes:

In March 2007 at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London we hosted an evening of animation related events which I took as an opportunity to make some more examples of my Phonographantasmascope, psychiatrist
an extension of the Zoetrope principle.

It is all live action and works by using the shutter speed of the camera rather than the rather irritating stroboscope methods other 3D Zoetropes use.








In the second video you can see how he can use foot pedals to change the chord.
An interesting variation of the zoetrope principle where the camera shutter is used instead of slits or strobes to freeze the motion. The downside (or potentially part of the attraction) is that the viewer needs to watch through a machine to experience the desired effect.




Jim le Ferve of Nexus Productions writes:

In March 2007 at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London we hosted an evening of animation related events which I took as an opportunity to make some more examples of my Phonographantasmascope, rx
an extension of the Zoetrope principle.

It is all live action and works by using the shutter speed of the camera rather than the rather irritating stroboscope methods other 3D Zoetropes use.

An interesting variation of the zoetrope principle where the camera shutter is used instead of slits or strobes to freeze the motion. The downside (or potentially part of the attraction) is that the viewer needs to watch through a machine to experience the desired effect.

Jim le Ferve of Nexus Productions writes:

In March 2007 at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London we hosted an evening of animation related events which I took as an opportunity to make some more examples of my Phonographantasmascope, psychiatrist
an extension of the Zoetrope principle.

It is all live action and works by using the shutter speed of the camera rather than the rather irritating stroboscope methods other 3D Zoetropes use.

An interesting variation of the zoetrope principle where the camera shutter is used instead of slits or strobes to freeze the motion. The downside (or potentially part of the attraction) is that the viewer needs to watch through a machine to experience the desired effect.

Jim le Ferve of Nexus Productions writes:

In March 2007 at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London we hosted an evening of animation related events which I took as an opportunity to make some more examples of my Phonographantasmascope, there
an extension of the Zoetrope principle.

It is all live action and works by using the shutter speed of the camera rather than the rather irritating stroboscope methods other 3D Zoetropes use.

An interesting variation of the zoetrope principle where the camera shutter is used instead of slits or strobes to freeze the motion. The downside (or potentially part of the attraction) is that the viewer needs to watch through a machine to experience the desired effect.



Jim le Ferve of Nexus Productions writes:

In March 2007 at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London we hosted an evening of animation related events which I took as an opportunity to make some more examples of my Phonographantasmascope, psychiatrist
an extension of the Zoetrope principle.

It is all live action and works by using the shutter speed of the camera rather than the rather irritating stroboscope methods other 3D Zoetropes use.

An interesting variation of the zoetrope principle where the camera shutter is used instead of slits or strobes to freeze the motion. The downside (or potentially part of the attraction) is that the viewer needs to watch through a machine to experience the desired effect.



Jim le Ferve of Nexus Productions writes:

In March 2007 at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London we hosted an evening of animation related events which I took as an opportunity to make some more examples of my Phonographantasmascope, noun
an extension of the Zoetrope principle.

It is all live action and works by using the shutter speed of the camera rather than the rather irritating stroboscope methods other 3D Zoetropes use.



Gijs Gieskes has made many wonderful machines from gameboys or other machines which he’s circuitbent.

He writes about the Acid Machine:

The circle with the lines that you see on the top of the machine, and rotates and displays the note you are playing.
When you play a C the lines in the middle circle will be standing still.. from the C it will go outward, displaying all notes on a keyboard in 12 steps.

It works by making a LED blink in the frequency of the sound, and rotating the image at a set speed.

more information here

(thanks, kevin!)


Gijs Gieskes has made many wonderful machines from gameboys or other machines which he’s circuitbent.

He writes about the Acid Machine:

The circle with the lines that you see on the top of the machine, abortion rotates and displays the note you are playing.
When you play a C the lines in the middle circle will be standing still.. from the C it will go outward, treatment displaying all notes on a keyboard in 12 steps.

It works by making a LED blink in the frequency of the sound, and rotating the image at a set speed.

more information here

(thanks, kevin!)


Gijs Gieskes has made many wonderful machines from gameboys or other machines which he’s circuitbent.

He writes about the Acid Machine:

The circle with the lines that you see on the top of the machine, capsule rotates and displays the note you are playing.
When you play a C the lines in the middle circle will be standing still.. from the C it will go outward, displaying all notes on a keyboard in 12 steps.

It works by making a LED blink in the frequency of the sound, and rotating the image at a set speed.

more information here

(thanks, kevin!)








In the second video you can see how he can use foot pedals to change the chord.








In the second video you can see how he can use foot pedals to change the chord.








In the second video you can see how he can use foot pedals to change the chord.
An interesting variation of the zoetrope principle where the camera shutter is used instead of slits or strobes to freeze the motion. The downside (or potentially part of the attraction) is that the viewer needs to watch through a machine to experience the desired effect.




Jim le Ferve of Nexus Productions writes:

In March 2007 at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London we hosted an evening of animation related events which I took as an opportunity to make some more examples of my Phonographantasmascope, rx
an extension of the Zoetrope principle.

It is all live action and works by using the shutter speed of the camera rather than the rather irritating stroboscope methods other 3D Zoetropes use.








In the second video you can see how he can use foot pedals to change the chord.








In the second video you can see how he can use foot pedals to change the chord.
An interesting variation of the zoetrope principle where the camera shutter is used instead of slits or strobes to freeze the motion. The downside (or potentially part of the attraction) is that the viewer needs to watch through a machine to experience the desired effect.




Jim le Ferve of Nexus Productions writes:

In March 2007 at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London we hosted an evening of animation related events which I took as an opportunity to make some more examples of my Phonographantasmascope, rx
an extension of the Zoetrope principle.

It is all live action and works by using the shutter speed of the camera rather than the rather irritating stroboscope methods other 3D Zoetropes use.








In the second video you can see how he can use foot pedals to change the chord.
An interesting variation of the zoetrope principle where the camera shutter is used instead of slits or strobes to freeze the motion. The downside (or potentially part of the attraction) is that the viewer needs to watch through a machine to experience the desired effect.




Jim le Ferve of Nexus Productions writes:

In March 2007 at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London we hosted an evening of animation related events which I took as an opportunity to make some more examples of my Phonographantasmascope, rx
an extension of the Zoetrope principle.

It is all live action and works by using the shutter speed of the camera rather than the rather irritating stroboscope methods other 3D Zoetropes use.

An interesting variation of the zoetrope principle where the camera shutter is used instead of slits or strobes to freeze the motion. The downside (or potentially part of the attraction) is that the viewer needs to watch through a machine to experience the desired effect.

Jim le Ferve of Nexus Productions writes:

In March 2007 at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London we hosted an evening of animation related events which I took as an opportunity to make some more examples of my Phonographantasmascope, psychiatrist
an extension of the Zoetrope principle.

It is all live action and works by using the shutter speed of the camera rather than the rather irritating stroboscope methods other 3D Zoetropes use.








In the second video you can see how he can use foot pedals to change the chord.








In the second video you can see how he can use foot pedals to change the chord.
An interesting variation of the zoetrope principle where the camera shutter is used instead of slits or strobes to freeze the motion. The downside (or potentially part of the attraction) is that the viewer needs to watch through a machine to experience the desired effect.




Jim le Ferve of Nexus Productions writes:

In March 2007 at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London we hosted an evening of animation related events which I took as an opportunity to make some more examples of my Phonographantasmascope, rx
an extension of the Zoetrope principle.

It is all live action and works by using the shutter speed of the camera rather than the rather irritating stroboscope methods other 3D Zoetropes use.








In the second video you can see how he can use foot pedals to change the chord.
An interesting variation of the zoetrope principle where the camera shutter is used instead of slits or strobes to freeze the motion. The downside (or potentially part of the attraction) is that the viewer needs to watch through a machine to experience the desired effect.




Jim le Ferve of Nexus Productions writes:

In March 2007 at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London we hosted an evening of animation related events which I took as an opportunity to make some more examples of my Phonographantasmascope, rx
an extension of the Zoetrope principle.

It is all live action and works by using the shutter speed of the camera rather than the rather irritating stroboscope methods other 3D Zoetropes use.

An interesting variation of the zoetrope principle where the camera shutter is used instead of slits or strobes to freeze the motion. The downside (or potentially part of the attraction) is that the viewer needs to watch through a machine to experience the desired effect.

Jim le Ferve of Nexus Productions writes:

In March 2007 at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London we hosted an evening of animation related events which I took as an opportunity to make some more examples of my Phonographantasmascope, psychiatrist
an extension of the Zoetrope principle.

It is all live action and works by using the shutter speed of the camera rather than the rather irritating stroboscope methods other 3D Zoetropes use.








In the second video you can see how he can use foot pedals to change the chord.
An interesting variation of the zoetrope principle where the camera shutter is used instead of slits or strobes to freeze the motion. The downside (or potentially part of the attraction) is that the viewer needs to watch through a machine to experience the desired effect.




Jim le Ferve of Nexus Productions writes:

In March 2007 at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London we hosted an evening of animation related events which I took as an opportunity to make some more examples of my Phonographantasmascope, rx
an extension of the Zoetrope principle.

It is all live action and works by using the shutter speed of the camera rather than the rather irritating stroboscope methods other 3D Zoetropes use.

An interesting variation of the zoetrope principle where the camera shutter is used instead of slits or strobes to freeze the motion. The downside (or potentially part of the attraction) is that the viewer needs to watch through a machine to experience the desired effect.

Jim le Ferve of Nexus Productions writes:

In March 2007 at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London we hosted an evening of animation related events which I took as an opportunity to make some more examples of my Phonographantasmascope, psychiatrist
an extension of the Zoetrope principle.

It is all live action and works by using the shutter speed of the camera rather than the rather irritating stroboscope methods other 3D Zoetropes use.

An interesting variation of the zoetrope principle where the camera shutter is used instead of slits or strobes to freeze the motion. The downside (or potentially part of the attraction) is that the viewer needs to watch through a machine to experience the desired effect.

Jim le Ferve of Nexus Productions writes:

In March 2007 at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London we hosted an evening of animation related events which I took as an opportunity to make some more examples of my Phonographantasmascope, there
an extension of the Zoetrope principle.

It is all live action and works by using the shutter speed of the camera rather than the rather irritating stroboscope methods other 3D Zoetropes use.








In the second video you can see how he can use foot pedals to change the chord.








In the second video you can see how he can use foot pedals to change the chord.
An interesting variation of the zoetrope principle where the camera shutter is used instead of slits or strobes to freeze the motion. The downside (or potentially part of the attraction) is that the viewer needs to watch through a machine to experience the desired effect.




Jim le Ferve of Nexus Productions writes:

In March 2007 at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London we hosted an evening of animation related events which I took as an opportunity to make some more examples of my Phonographantasmascope, rx
an extension of the Zoetrope principle.

It is all live action and works by using the shutter speed of the camera rather than the rather irritating stroboscope methods other 3D Zoetropes use.








In the second video you can see how he can use foot pedals to change the chord.
An interesting variation of the zoetrope principle where the camera shutter is used instead of slits or strobes to freeze the motion. The downside (or potentially part of the attraction) is that the viewer needs to watch through a machine to experience the desired effect.




Jim le Ferve of Nexus Productions writes:

In March 2007 at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London we hosted an evening of animation related events which I took as an opportunity to make some more examples of my Phonographantasmascope, rx
an extension of the Zoetrope principle.

It is all live action and works by using the shutter speed of the camera rather than the rather irritating stroboscope methods other 3D Zoetropes use.

An interesting variation of the zoetrope principle where the camera shutter is used instead of slits or strobes to freeze the motion. The downside (or potentially part of the attraction) is that the viewer needs to watch through a machine to experience the desired effect.

Jim le Ferve of Nexus Productions writes:

In March 2007 at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London we hosted an evening of animation related events which I took as an opportunity to make some more examples of my Phonographantasmascope, psychiatrist
an extension of the Zoetrope principle.

It is all live action and works by using the shutter speed of the camera rather than the rather irritating stroboscope methods other 3D Zoetropes use.








In the second video you can see how he can use foot pedals to change the chord.
An interesting variation of the zoetrope principle where the camera shutter is used instead of slits or strobes to freeze the motion. The downside (or potentially part of the attraction) is that the viewer needs to watch through a machine to experience the desired effect.




Jim le Ferve of Nexus Productions writes:

In March 2007 at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London we hosted an evening of animation related events which I took as an opportunity to make some more examples of my Phonographantasmascope, rx
an extension of the Zoetrope principle.

It is all live action and works by using the shutter speed of the camera rather than the rather irritating stroboscope methods other 3D Zoetropes use.

An interesting variation of the zoetrope principle where the camera shutter is used instead of slits or strobes to freeze the motion. The downside (or potentially part of the attraction) is that the viewer needs to watch through a machine to experience the desired effect.

Jim le Ferve of Nexus Productions writes:

In March 2007 at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London we hosted an evening of animation related events which I took as an opportunity to make some more examples of my Phonographantasmascope, psychiatrist
an extension of the Zoetrope principle.

It is all live action and works by using the shutter speed of the camera rather than the rather irritating stroboscope methods other 3D Zoetropes use.

An interesting variation of the zoetrope principle where the camera shutter is used instead of slits or strobes to freeze the motion. The downside (or potentially part of the attraction) is that the viewer needs to watch through a machine to experience the desired effect.

Jim le Ferve of Nexus Productions writes:

In March 2007 at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London we hosted an evening of animation related events which I took as an opportunity to make some more examples of my Phonographantasmascope, there
an extension of the Zoetrope principle.

It is all live action and works by using the shutter speed of the camera rather than the rather irritating stroboscope methods other 3D Zoetropes use.








In the second video you can see how he can use foot pedals to change the chord.
An interesting variation of the zoetrope principle where the camera shutter is used instead of slits or strobes to freeze the motion. The downside (or potentially part of the attraction) is that the viewer needs to watch through a machine to experience the desired effect.




Jim le Ferve of Nexus Productions writes:

In March 2007 at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London we hosted an evening of animation related events which I took as an opportunity to make some more examples of my Phonographantasmascope, rx
an extension of the Zoetrope principle.

It is all live action and works by using the shutter speed of the camera rather than the rather irritating stroboscope methods other 3D Zoetropes use.

An interesting variation of the zoetrope principle where the camera shutter is used instead of slits or strobes to freeze the motion. The downside (or potentially part of the attraction) is that the viewer needs to watch through a machine to experience the desired effect.

Jim le Ferve of Nexus Productions writes:

In March 2007 at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London we hosted an evening of animation related events which I took as an opportunity to make some more examples of my Phonographantasmascope, psychiatrist
an extension of the Zoetrope principle.

It is all live action and works by using the shutter speed of the camera rather than the rather irritating stroboscope methods other 3D Zoetropes use.

An interesting variation of the zoetrope principle where the camera shutter is used instead of slits or strobes to freeze the motion. The downside (or potentially part of the attraction) is that the viewer needs to watch through a machine to experience the desired effect.

Jim le Ferve of Nexus Productions writes:

In March 2007 at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London we hosted an evening of animation related events which I took as an opportunity to make some more examples of my Phonographantasmascope, there
an extension of the Zoetrope principle.

It is all live action and works by using the shutter speed of the camera rather than the rather irritating stroboscope methods other 3D Zoetropes use.

An interesting variation of the zoetrope principle where the camera shutter is used instead of slits or strobes to freeze the motion. The downside (or potentially part of the attraction) is that the viewer needs to watch through a machine to experience the desired effect.



Jim le Ferve of Nexus Productions writes:

In March 2007 at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London we hosted an evening of animation related events which I took as an opportunity to make some more examples of my Phonographantasmascope, psychiatrist
an extension of the Zoetrope principle.

It is all live action and works by using the shutter speed of the camera rather than the rather irritating stroboscope methods other 3D Zoetropes use.








In the second video you can see how he can use foot pedals to change the chord.








In the second video you can see how he can use foot pedals to change the chord.
An interesting variation of the zoetrope principle where the camera shutter is used instead of slits or strobes to freeze the motion. The downside (or potentially part of the attraction) is that the viewer needs to watch through a machine to experience the desired effect.




Jim le Ferve of Nexus Productions writes:

In March 2007 at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London we hosted an evening of animation related events which I took as an opportunity to make some more examples of my Phonographantasmascope, rx
an extension of the Zoetrope principle.

It is all live action and works by using the shutter speed of the camera rather than the rather irritating stroboscope methods other 3D Zoetropes use.








In the second video you can see how he can use foot pedals to change the chord.
An interesting variation of the zoetrope principle where the camera shutter is used instead of slits or strobes to freeze the motion. The downside (or potentially part of the attraction) is that the viewer needs to watch through a machine to experience the desired effect.




Jim le Ferve of Nexus Productions writes:

In March 2007 at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London we hosted an evening of animation related events which I took as an opportunity to make some more examples of my Phonographantasmascope, rx
an extension of the Zoetrope principle.

It is all live action and works by using the shutter speed of the camera rather than the rather irritating stroboscope methods other 3D Zoetropes use.

An interesting variation of the zoetrope principle where the camera shutter is used instead of slits or strobes to freeze the motion. The downside (or potentially part of the attraction) is that the viewer needs to watch through a machine to experience the desired effect.

Jim le Ferve of Nexus Productions writes:

In March 2007 at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London we hosted an evening of animation related events which I took as an opportunity to make some more examples of my Phonographantasmascope, psychiatrist
an extension of the Zoetrope principle.

It is all live action and works by using the shutter speed of the camera rather than the rather irritating stroboscope methods other 3D Zoetropes use.








In the second video you can see how he can use foot pedals to change the chord.
An interesting variation of the zoetrope principle where the camera shutter is used instead of slits or strobes to freeze the motion. The downside (or potentially part of the attraction) is that the viewer needs to watch through a machine to experience the desired effect.




Jim le Ferve of Nexus Productions writes:

In March 2007 at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London we hosted an evening of animation related events which I took as an opportunity to make some more examples of my Phonographantasmascope, rx
an extension of the Zoetrope principle.

It is all live action and works by using the shutter speed of the camera rather than the rather irritating stroboscope methods other 3D Zoetropes use.

An interesting variation of the zoetrope principle where the camera shutter is used instead of slits or strobes to freeze the motion. The downside (or potentially part of the attraction) is that the viewer needs to watch through a machine to experience the desired effect.

Jim le Ferve of Nexus Productions writes:

In March 2007 at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London we hosted an evening of animation related events which I took as an opportunity to make some more examples of my Phonographantasmascope, psychiatrist
an extension of the Zoetrope principle.

It is all live action and works by using the shutter speed of the camera rather than the rather irritating stroboscope methods other 3D Zoetropes use.

An interesting variation of the zoetrope principle where the camera shutter is used instead of slits or strobes to freeze the motion. The downside (or potentially part of the attraction) is that the viewer needs to watch through a machine to experience the desired effect.

Jim le Ferve of Nexus Productions writes:

In March 2007 at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London we hosted an evening of animation related events which I took as an opportunity to make some more examples of my Phonographantasmascope, there
an extension of the Zoetrope principle.

It is all live action and works by using the shutter speed of the camera rather than the rather irritating stroboscope methods other 3D Zoetropes use.








In the second video you can see how he can use foot pedals to change the chord.
An interesting variation of the zoetrope principle where the camera shutter is used instead of slits or strobes to freeze the motion. The downside (or potentially part of the attraction) is that the viewer needs to watch through a machine to experience the desired effect.




Jim le Ferve of Nexus Productions writes:

In March 2007 at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London we hosted an evening of animation related events which I took as an opportunity to make some more examples of my Phonographantasmascope, rx
an extension of the Zoetrope principle.

It is all live action and works by using the shutter speed of the camera rather than the rather irritating stroboscope methods other 3D Zoetropes use.

An interesting variation of the zoetrope principle where the camera shutter is used instead of slits or strobes to freeze the motion. The downside (or potentially part of the attraction) is that the viewer needs to watch through a machine to experience the desired effect.

Jim le Ferve of Nexus Productions writes:

In March 2007 at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London we hosted an evening of animation related events which I took as an opportunity to make some more examples of my Phonographantasmascope, psychiatrist
an extension of the Zoetrope principle.

It is all live action and works by using the shutter speed of the camera rather than the rather irritating stroboscope methods other 3D Zoetropes use.

An interesting variation of the zoetrope principle where the camera shutter is used instead of slits or strobes to freeze the motion. The downside (or potentially part of the attraction) is that the viewer needs to watch through a machine to experience the desired effect.

Jim le Ferve of Nexus Productions writes:

In March 2007 at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London we hosted an evening of animation related events which I took as an opportunity to make some more examples of my Phonographantasmascope, there
an extension of the Zoetrope principle.

It is all live action and works by using the shutter speed of the camera rather than the rather irritating stroboscope methods other 3D Zoetropes use.

An interesting variation of the zoetrope principle where the camera shutter is used instead of slits or strobes to freeze the motion. The downside (or potentially part of the attraction) is that the viewer needs to watch through a machine to experience the desired effect.



Jim le Ferve of Nexus Productions writes:

In March 2007 at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London we hosted an evening of animation related events which I took as an opportunity to make some more examples of my Phonographantasmascope, psychiatrist
an extension of the Zoetrope principle.

It is all live action and works by using the shutter speed of the camera rather than the rather irritating stroboscope methods other 3D Zoetropes use.








In the second video you can see how he can use foot pedals to change the chord.
An interesting variation of the zoetrope principle where the camera shutter is used instead of slits or strobes to freeze the motion. The downside (or potentially part of the attraction) is that the viewer needs to watch through a machine to experience the desired effect.




Jim le Ferve of Nexus Productions writes:

In March 2007 at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London we hosted an evening of animation related events which I took as an opportunity to make some more examples of my Phonographantasmascope, rx
an extension of the Zoetrope principle.

It is all live action and works by using the shutter speed of the camera rather than the rather irritating stroboscope methods other 3D Zoetropes use.

An interesting variation of the zoetrope principle where the camera shutter is used instead of slits or strobes to freeze the motion. The downside (or potentially part of the attraction) is that the viewer needs to watch through a machine to experience the desired effect.

Jim le Ferve of Nexus Productions writes:

In March 2007 at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London we hosted an evening of animation related events which I took as an opportunity to make some more examples of my Phonographantasmascope, psychiatrist
an extension of the Zoetrope principle.

It is all live action and works by using the shutter speed of the camera rather than the rather irritating stroboscope methods other 3D Zoetropes use.

An interesting variation of the zoetrope principle where the camera shutter is used instead of slits or strobes to freeze the motion. The downside (or potentially part of the attraction) is that the viewer needs to watch through a machine to experience the desired effect.

Jim le Ferve of Nexus Productions writes:

In March 2007 at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London we hosted an evening of animation related events which I took as an opportunity to make some more examples of my Phonographantasmascope, there
an extension of the Zoetrope principle.

It is all live action and works by using the shutter speed of the camera rather than the rather irritating stroboscope methods other 3D Zoetropes use.

An interesting variation of the zoetrope principle where the camera shutter is used instead of slits or strobes to freeze the motion. The downside (or potentially part of the attraction) is that the viewer needs to watch through a machine to experience the desired effect.



Jim le Ferve of Nexus Productions writes:

In March 2007 at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London we hosted an evening of animation related events which I took as an opportunity to make some more examples of my Phonographantasmascope, psychiatrist
an extension of the Zoetrope principle.

It is all live action and works by using the shutter speed of the camera rather than the rather irritating stroboscope methods other 3D Zoetropes use.

An interesting variation of the zoetrope principle where the camera shutter is used instead of slits or strobes to freeze the motion. The downside (or potentially part of the attraction) is that the viewer needs to watch through a machine to experience the desired effect.



Jim le Ferve of Nexus Productions writes:

In March 2007 at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London we hosted an evening of animation related events which I took as an opportunity to make some more examples of my Phonographantasmascope, noun
an extension of the Zoetrope principle.

It is all live action and works by using the shutter speed of the camera rather than the rather irritating stroboscope methods other 3D Zoetropes use.








In the second video you can see how he can use foot pedals to change the chord.








In the second video you can see how he can use foot pedals to change the chord.
An interesting variation of the zoetrope principle where the camera shutter is used instead of slits or strobes to freeze the motion. The downside (or potentially part of the attraction) is that the viewer needs to watch through a machine to experience the desired effect.




Jim le Ferve of Nexus Productions writes:

In March 2007 at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London we hosted an evening of animation related events which I took as an opportunity to make some more examples of my Phonographantasmascope, rx
an extension of the Zoetrope principle.

It is all live action and works by using the shutter speed of the camera rather than the rather irritating stroboscope methods other 3D Zoetropes use.








In the second video you can see how he can use foot pedals to change the chord.
An interesting variation of the zoetrope principle where the camera shutter is used instead of slits or strobes to freeze the motion. The downside (or potentially part of the attraction) is that the viewer needs to watch through a machine to experience the desired effect.




Jim le Ferve of Nexus Productions writes:

In March 2007 at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London we hosted an evening of animation related events which I took as an opportunity to make some more examples of my Phonographantasmascope, rx
an extension of the Zoetrope principle.

It is all live action and works by using the shutter speed of the camera rather than the rather irritating stroboscope methods other 3D Zoetropes use.

An interesting variation of the zoetrope principle where the camera shutter is used instead of slits or strobes to freeze the motion. The downside (or potentially part of the attraction) is that the viewer needs to watch through a machine to experience the desired effect.

Jim le Ferve of Nexus Productions writes:

In March 2007 at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London we hosted an evening of animation related events which I took as an opportunity to make some more examples of my Phonographantasmascope, psychiatrist
an extension of the Zoetrope principle.

It is all live action and works by using the shutter speed of the camera rather than the rather irritating stroboscope methods other 3D Zoetropes use.








In the second video you can see how he can use foot pedals to change the chord.
An interesting variation of the zoetrope principle where the camera shutter is used instead of slits or strobes to freeze the motion. The downside (or potentially part of the attraction) is that the viewer needs to watch through a machine to experience the desired effect.




Jim le Ferve of Nexus Productions writes:

In March 2007 at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London we hosted an evening of animation related events which I took as an opportunity to make some more examples of my Phonographantasmascope, rx
an extension of the Zoetrope principle.

It is all live action and works by using the shutter speed of the camera rather than the rather irritating stroboscope methods other 3D Zoetropes use.

An interesting variation of the zoetrope principle where the camera shutter is used instead of slits or strobes to freeze the motion. The downside (or potentially part of the attraction) is that the viewer needs to watch through a machine to experience the desired effect.

Jim le Ferve of Nexus Productions writes:

In March 2007 at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London we hosted an evening of animation related events which I took as an opportunity to make some more examples of my Phonographantasmascope, psychiatrist
an extension of the Zoetrope principle.

It is all live action and works by using the shutter speed of the camera rather than the rather irritating stroboscope methods other 3D Zoetropes use.

An interesting variation of the zoetrope principle where the camera shutter is used instead of slits or strobes to freeze the motion. The downside (or potentially part of the attraction) is that the viewer needs to watch through a machine to experience the desired effect.

Jim le Ferve of Nexus Productions writes:

In March 2007 at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London we hosted an evening of animation related events which I took as an opportunity to make some more examples of my Phonographantasmascope, there
an extension of the Zoetrope principle.

It is all live action and works by using the shutter speed of the camera rather than the rather irritating stroboscope methods other 3D Zoetropes use.








In the second video you can see how he can use foot pedals to change the chord.
An interesting variation of the zoetrope principle where the camera shutter is used instead of slits or strobes to freeze the motion. The downside (or potentially part of the attraction) is that the viewer needs to watch through a machine to experience the desired effect.




Jim le Ferve of Nexus Productions writes:

In March 2007 at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London we hosted an evening of animation related events which I took as an opportunity to make some more examples of my Phonographantasmascope, rx
an extension of the Zoetrope principle.

It is all live action and works by using the shutter speed of the camera rather than the rather irritating stroboscope methods other 3D Zoetropes use.

An interesting variation of the zoetrope principle where the camera shutter is used instead of slits or strobes to freeze the motion. The downside (or potentially part of the attraction) is that the viewer needs to watch through a machine to experience the desired effect.

Jim le Ferve of Nexus Productions writes:

In March 2007 at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London we hosted an evening of animation related events which I took as an opportunity to make some more examples of my Phonographantasmascope, psychiatrist
an extension of the Zoetrope principle.

It is all live action and works by using the shutter speed of the camera rather than the rather irritating stroboscope methods other 3D Zoetropes use.

An interesting variation of the zoetrope principle where the camera shutter is used instead of slits or strobes to freeze the motion. The downside (or potentially part of the attraction) is that the viewer needs to watch through a machine to experience the desired effect.

Jim le Ferve of Nexus Productions writes:

In March 2007 at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London we hosted an evening of animation related events which I took as an opportunity to make some more examples of my Phonographantasmascope, there
an extension of the Zoetrope principle.

It is all live action and works by using the shutter speed of the camera rather than the rather irritating stroboscope methods other 3D Zoetropes use.

An interesting variation of the zoetrope principle where the camera shutter is used instead of slits or strobes to freeze the motion. The downside (or potentially part of the attraction) is that the viewer needs to watch through a machine to experience the desired effect.



Jim le Ferve of Nexus Productions writes:

In March 2007 at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London we hosted an evening of animation related events which I took as an opportunity to make some more examples of my Phonographantasmascope, psychiatrist
an extension of the Zoetrope principle.

It is all live action and works by using the shutter speed of the camera rather than the rather irritating stroboscope methods other 3D Zoetropes use.








In the second video you can see how he can use foot pedals to change the chord.
An interesting variation of the zoetrope principle where the camera shutter is used instead of slits or strobes to freeze the motion. The downside (or potentially part of the attraction) is that the viewer needs to watch through a machine to experience the desired effect.




Jim le Ferve of Nexus Productions writes:

In March 2007 at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London we hosted an evening of animation related events which I took as an opportunity to make some more examples of my Phonographantasmascope, rx
an extension of the Zoetrope principle.

It is all live action and works by using the shutter speed of the camera rather than the rather irritating stroboscope methods other 3D Zoetropes use.

An interesting variation of the zoetrope principle where the camera shutter is used instead of slits or strobes to freeze the motion. The downside (or potentially part of the attraction) is that the viewer needs to watch through a machine to experience the desired effect.

Jim le Ferve of Nexus Productions writes:

In March 2007 at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London we hosted an evening of animation related events which I took as an opportunity to make some more examples of my Phonographantasmascope, psychiatrist
an extension of the Zoetrope principle.

It is all live action and works by using the shutter speed of the camera rather than the rather irritating stroboscope methods other 3D Zoetropes use.

An interesting variation of the zoetrope principle where the camera shutter is used instead of slits or strobes to freeze the motion. The downside (or potentially part of the attraction) is that the viewer needs to watch through a machine to experience the desired effect.

Jim le Ferve of Nexus Productions writes:

In March 2007 at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London we hosted an evening of animation related events which I took as an opportunity to make some more examples of my Phonographantasmascope, there
an extension of the Zoetrope principle.

It is all live action and works by using the shutter speed of the camera rather than the rather irritating stroboscope methods other 3D Zoetropes use.

An interesting variation of the zoetrope principle where the camera shutter is used instead of slits or strobes to freeze the motion. The downside (or potentially part of the attraction) is that the viewer needs to watch through a machine to experience the desired effect.



Jim le Ferve of Nexus Productions writes:

In March 2007 at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London we hosted an evening of animation related events which I took as an opportunity to make some more examples of my Phonographantasmascope, psychiatrist
an extension of the Zoetrope principle.

It is all live action and works by using the shutter speed of the camera rather than the rather irritating stroboscope methods other 3D Zoetropes use.

An interesting variation of the zoetrope principle where the camera shutter is used instead of slits or strobes to freeze the motion. The downside (or potentially part of the attraction) is that the viewer needs to watch through a machine to experience the desired effect.



Jim le Ferve of Nexus Productions writes:

In March 2007 at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London we hosted an evening of animation related events which I took as an opportunity to make some more examples of my Phonographantasmascope, noun
an extension of the Zoetrope principle.

It is all live action and works by using the shutter speed of the camera rather than the rather irritating stroboscope methods other 3D Zoetropes use.



Gijs Gieskes has made many wonderful machines from gameboys or other machines which he’s circuitbent.

He writes about the Acid Machine:

The circle with the lines that you see on the top of the machine, and rotates and displays the note you are playing.
When you play a C the lines in the middle circle will be standing still.. from the C it will go outward, displaying all notes on a keyboard in 12 steps.

It works by making a LED blink in the frequency of the sound, and rotating the image at a set speed.

more information here

(thanks, kevin!)








In the second video you can see how he can use foot pedals to change the chord.








In the second video you can see how he can use foot pedals to change the chord.
An interesting variation of the zoetrope principle where the camera shutter is used instead of slits or strobes to freeze the motion. The downside (or potentially part of the attraction) is that the viewer needs to watch through a machine to experience the desired effect.




Jim le Ferve of Nexus Productions writes:

In March 2007 at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London we hosted an evening of animation related events which I took as an opportunity to make some more examples of my Phonographantasmascope, rx
an extension of the Zoetrope principle.

It is all live action and works by using the shutter speed of the camera rather than the rather irritating stroboscope methods other 3D Zoetropes use.








In the second video you can see how he can use foot pedals to change the chord.
An interesting variation of the zoetrope principle where the camera shutter is used instead of slits or strobes to freeze the motion. The downside (or potentially part of the attraction) is that the viewer needs to watch through a machine to experience the desired effect.




Jim le Ferve of Nexus Productions writes:

In March 2007 at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London we hosted an evening of animation related events which I took as an opportunity to make some more examples of my Phonographantasmascope, rx
an extension of the Zoetrope principle.

It is all live action and works by using the shutter speed of the camera rather than the rather irritating stroboscope methods other 3D Zoetropes use.

An interesting variation of the zoetrope principle where the camera shutter is used instead of slits or strobes to freeze the motion. The downside (or potentially part of the attraction) is that the viewer needs to watch through a machine to experience the desired effect.

Jim le Ferve of Nexus Productions writes:

In March 2007 at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London we hosted an evening of animation related events which I took as an opportunity to make some more examples of my Phonographantasmascope, psychiatrist
an extension of the Zoetrope principle.

It is all live action and works by using the shutter speed of the camera rather than the rather irritating stroboscope methods other 3D Zoetropes use.








In the second video you can see how he can use foot pedals to change the chord.
An interesting variation of the zoetrope principle where the camera shutter is used instead of slits or strobes to freeze the motion. The downside (or potentially part of the attraction) is that the viewer needs to watch through a machine to experience the desired effect.




Jim le Ferve of Nexus Productions writes:

In March 2007 at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London we hosted an evening of animation related events which I took as an opportunity to make some more examples of my Phonographantasmascope, rx
an extension of the Zoetrope principle.

It is all live action and works by using the shutter speed of the camera rather than the rather irritating stroboscope methods other 3D Zoetropes use.

An interesting variation of the zoetrope principle where the camera shutter is used instead of slits or strobes to freeze the motion. The downside (or potentially part of the attraction) is that the viewer needs to watch through a machine to experience the desired effect.

Jim le Ferve of Nexus Productions writes:

In March 2007 at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London we hosted an evening of animation related events which I took as an opportunity to make some more examples of my Phonographantasmascope, psychiatrist
an extension of the Zoetrope principle.

It is all live action and works by using the shutter speed of the camera rather than the rather irritating stroboscope methods other 3D Zoetropes use.

An interesting variation of the zoetrope principle where the camera shutter is used instead of slits or strobes to freeze the motion. The downside (or potentially part of the attraction) is that the viewer needs to watch through a machine to experience the desired effect.

Jim le Ferve of Nexus Productions writes:

In March 2007 at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London we hosted an evening of animation related events which I took as an opportunity to make some more examples of my Phonographantasmascope, there
an extension of the Zoetrope principle.

It is all live action and works by using the shutter speed of the camera rather than the rather irritating stroboscope methods other 3D Zoetropes use.








In the second video you can see how he can use foot pedals to change the chord.
An interesting variation of the zoetrope principle where the camera shutter is used instead of slits or strobes to freeze the motion. The downside (or potentially part of the attraction) is that the viewer needs to watch through a machine to experience the desired effect.




Jim le Ferve of Nexus Productions writes:

In March 2007 at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London we hosted an evening of animation related events which I took as an opportunity to make some more examples of my Phonographantasmascope, rx
an extension of the Zoetrope principle.

It is all live action and works by using the shutter speed of the camera rather than the rather irritating stroboscope methods other 3D Zoetropes use.

An interesting variation of the zoetrope principle where the camera shutter is used instead of slits or strobes to freeze the motion. The downside (or potentially part of the attraction) is that the viewer needs to watch through a machine to experience the desired effect.

Jim le Ferve of Nexus Productions writes:

In March 2007 at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London we hosted an evening of animation related events which I took as an opportunity to make some more examples of my Phonographantasmascope, psychiatrist
an extension of the Zoetrope principle.

It is all live action and works by using the shutter speed of the camera rather than the rather irritating stroboscope methods other 3D Zoetropes use.

An interesting variation of the zoetrope principle where the camera shutter is used instead of slits or strobes to freeze the motion. The downside (or potentially part of the attraction) is that the viewer needs to watch through a machine to experience the desired effect.

Jim le Ferve of Nexus Productions writes:

In March 2007 at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London we hosted an evening of animation related events which I took as an opportunity to make some more examples of my Phonographantasmascope, there
an extension of the Zoetrope principle.

It is all live action and works by using the shutter speed of the camera rather than the rather irritating stroboscope methods other 3D Zoetropes use.

An interesting variation of the zoetrope principle where the camera shutter is used instead of slits or strobes to freeze the motion. The downside (or potentially part of the attraction) is that the viewer needs to watch through a machine to experience the desired effect.



Jim le Ferve of Nexus Productions writes:

In March 2007 at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London we hosted an evening of animation related events which I took as an opportunity to make some more examples of my Phonographantasmascope, psychiatrist
an extension of the Zoetrope principle.

It is all live action and works by using the shutter speed of the camera rather than the rather irritating stroboscope methods other 3D Zoetropes use.








In the second video you can see how he can use foot pedals to change the chord.
An interesting variation of the zoetrope principle where the camera shutter is used instead of slits or strobes to freeze the motion. The downside (or potentially part of the attraction) is that the viewer needs to watch through a machine to experience the desired effect.




Jim le Ferve of Nexus Productions writes:

In March 2007 at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London we hosted an evening of animation related events which I took as an opportunity to make some more examples of my Phonographantasmascope, rx
an extension of the Zoetrope principle.

It is all live action and works by using the shutter speed of the camera rather than the rather irritating stroboscope methods other 3D Zoetropes use.

An interesting variation of the zoetrope principle where the camera shutter is used instead of slits or strobes to freeze the motion. The downside (or potentially part of the attraction) is that the viewer needs to watch through a machine to experience the desired effect.

Jim le Ferve of Nexus Productions writes:

In March 2007 at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London we hosted an evening of animation related events which I took as an opportunity to make some more examples of my Phonographantasmascope, psychiatrist
an extension of the Zoetrope principle.

It is all live action and works by using the shutter speed of the camera rather than the rather irritating stroboscope methods other 3D Zoetropes use.

An interesting variation of the zoetrope principle where the camera shutter is used instead of slits or strobes to freeze the motion. The downside (or potentially part of the attraction) is that the viewer needs to watch through a machine to experience the desired effect.

Jim le Ferve of Nexus Productions writes:

In March 2007 at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London we hosted an evening of animation related events which I took as an opportunity to make some more examples of my Phonographantasmascope, there
an extension of the Zoetrope principle.

It is all live action and works by using the shutter speed of the camera rather than the rather irritating stroboscope methods other 3D Zoetropes use.

An interesting variation of the zoetrope principle where the camera shutter is used instead of slits or strobes to freeze the motion. The downside (or potentially part of the attraction) is that the viewer needs to watch through a machine to experience the desired effect.



Jim le Ferve of Nexus Productions writes:

In March 2007 at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London we hosted an evening of animation related events which I took as an opportunity to make some more examples of my Phonographantasmascope, psychiatrist
an extension of the Zoetrope principle.

It is all live action and works by using the shutter speed of the camera rather than the rather irritating stroboscope methods other 3D Zoetropes use.

An interesting variation of the zoetrope principle where the camera shutter is used instead of slits or strobes to freeze the motion. The downside (or potentially part of the attraction) is that the viewer needs to watch through a machine to experience the desired effect.



Jim le Ferve of Nexus Productions writes:

In March 2007 at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London we hosted an evening of animation related events which I took as an opportunity to make some more examples of my Phonographantasmascope, noun
an extension of the Zoetrope principle.

It is all live action and works by using the shutter speed of the camera rather than the rather irritating stroboscope methods other 3D Zoetropes use.



Gijs Gieskes has made many wonderful machines from gameboys or other machines which he’s circuitbent.

He writes about the Acid Machine:

The circle with the lines that you see on the top of the machine, and rotates and displays the note you are playing.
When you play a C the lines in the middle circle will be standing still.. from the C it will go outward, displaying all notes on a keyboard in 12 steps.

It works by making a LED blink in the frequency of the sound, and rotating the image at a set speed.

more information here

(thanks, kevin!)


Gijs Gieskes has made many wonderful machines from gameboys or other machines which he’s circuitbent.

He writes about the Acid Machine:

The circle with the lines that you see on the top of the machine, abortion rotates and displays the note you are playing.
When you play a C the lines in the middle circle will be standing still.. from the C it will go outward, treatment displaying all notes on a keyboard in 12 steps.

It works by making a LED blink in the frequency of the sound, and rotating the image at a set speed.

more information here

(thanks, kevin!)








In the second video you can see how he can use foot pedals to change the chord.








In the second video you can see how he can use foot pedals to change the chord.
An interesting variation of the zoetrope principle where the camera shutter is used instead of slits or strobes to freeze the motion. The downside (or potentially part of the attraction) is that the viewer needs to watch through a machine to experience the desired effect.




Jim le Ferve of Nexus Productions writes:

In March 2007 at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London we hosted an evening of animation related events which I took as an opportunity to make some more examples of my Phonographantasmascope, rx
an extension of the Zoetrope principle.

It is all live action and works by using the shutter speed of the camera rather than the rather irritating stroboscope methods other 3D Zoetropes use.








In the second video you can see how he can use foot pedals to change the chord.
An interesting variation of the zoetrope principle where the camera shutter is used instead of slits or strobes to freeze the motion. The downside (or potentially part of the attraction) is that the viewer needs to watch through a machine to experience the desired effect.




Jim le Ferve of Nexus Productions writes:

In March 2007 at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London we hosted an evening of animation related events which I took as an opportunity to make some more examples of my Phonographantasmascope, rx
an extension of the Zoetrope principle.

It is all live action and works by using the shutter speed of the camera rather than the rather irritating stroboscope methods other 3D Zoetropes use.

An interesting variation of the zoetrope principle where the camera shutter is used instead of slits or strobes to freeze the motion. The downside (or potentially part of the attraction) is that the viewer needs to watch through a machine to experience the desired effect.

Jim le Ferve of Nexus Productions writes:

In March 2007 at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London we hosted an evening of animation related events which I took as an opportunity to make some more examples of my Phonographantasmascope, psychiatrist
an extension of the Zoetrope principle.

It is all live action and works by using the shutter speed of the camera rather than the rather irritating stroboscope methods other 3D Zoetropes use.








In the second video you can see how he can use foot pedals to change the chord.
An interesting variation of the zoetrope principle where the camera shutter is used instead of slits or strobes to freeze the motion. The downside (or potentially part of the attraction) is that the viewer needs to watch through a machine to experience the desired effect.




Jim le Ferve of Nexus Productions writes:

In March 2007 at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London we hosted an evening of animation related events which I took as an opportunity to make some more examples of my Phonographantasmascope, rx
an extension of the Zoetrope principle.

It is all live action and works by using the shutter speed of the camera rather than the rather irritating stroboscope methods other 3D Zoetropes use.

An interesting variation of the zoetrope principle where the camera shutter is used instead of slits or strobes to freeze the motion. The downside (or potentially part of the attraction) is that the viewer needs to watch through a machine to experience the desired effect.

Jim le Ferve of Nexus Productions writes:

In March 2007 at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London we hosted an evening of animation related events which I took as an opportunity to make some more examples of my Phonographantasmascope, psychiatrist
an extension of the Zoetrope principle.

It is all live action and works by using the shutter speed of the camera rather than the rather irritating stroboscope methods other 3D Zoetropes use.

An interesting variation of the zoetrope principle where the camera shutter is used instead of slits or strobes to freeze the motion. The downside (or potentially part of the attraction) is that the viewer needs to watch through a machine to experience the desired effect.

Jim le Ferve of Nexus Productions writes:

In March 2007 at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London we hosted an evening of animation related events which I took as an opportunity to make some more examples of my Phonographantasmascope, there
an extension of the Zoetrope principle.

It is all live action and works by using the shutter speed of the camera rather than the rather irritating stroboscope methods other 3D Zoetropes use.








In the second video you can see how he can use foot pedals to change the chord.
An interesting variation of the zoetrope principle where the camera shutter is used instead of slits or strobes to freeze the motion. The downside (or potentially part of the attraction) is that the viewer needs to watch through a machine to experience the desired effect.




Jim le Ferve of Nexus Productions writes:

In March 2007 at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London we hosted an evening of animation related events which I took as an opportunity to make some more examples of my Phonographantasmascope, rx
an extension of the Zoetrope principle.

It is all live action and works by using the shutter speed of the camera rather than the rather irritating stroboscope methods other 3D Zoetropes use.

An interesting variation of the zoetrope principle where the camera shutter is used instead of slits or strobes to freeze the motion. The downside (or potentially part of the attraction) is that the viewer needs to watch through a machine to experience the desired effect.

Jim le Ferve of Nexus Productions writes:

In March 2007 at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London we hosted an evening of animation related events which I took as an opportunity to make some more examples of my Phonographantasmascope, psychiatrist
an extension of the Zoetrope principle.

It is all live action and works by using the shutter speed of the camera rather than the rather irritating stroboscope methods other 3D Zoetropes use.

An interesting variation of the zoetrope principle where the camera shutter is used instead of slits or strobes to freeze the motion. The downside (or potentially part of the attraction) is that the viewer needs to watch through a machine to experience the desired effect.

Jim le Ferve of Nexus Productions writes:

In March 2007 at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London we hosted an evening of animation related events which I took as an opportunity to make some more examples of my Phonographantasmascope, there
an extension of the Zoetrope principle.

It is all live action and works by using the shutter speed of the camera rather than the rather irritating stroboscope methods other 3D Zoetropes use.

An interesting variation of the zoetrope principle where the camera shutter is used instead of slits or strobes to freeze the motion. The downside (or potentially part of the attraction) is that the viewer needs to watch through a machine to experience the desired effect.



Jim le Ferve of Nexus Productions writes:

In March 2007 at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London we hosted an evening of animation related events which I took as an opportunity to make some more examples of my Phonographantasmascope, psychiatrist
an extension of the Zoetrope principle.

It is all live action and works by using the shutter speed of the camera rather than the rather irritating stroboscope methods other 3D Zoetropes use.








In the second video you can see how he can use foot pedals to change the chord.
An interesting variation of the zoetrope principle where the camera shutter is used instead of slits or strobes to freeze the motion. The downside (or potentially part of the attraction) is that the viewer needs to watch through a machine to experience the desired effect.




Jim le Ferve of Nexus Productions writes:

In March 2007 at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London we hosted an evening of animation related events which I took as an opportunity to make some more examples of my Phonographantasmascope, rx
an extension of the Zoetrope principle.

It is all live action and works by using the shutter speed of the camera rather than the rather irritating stroboscope methods other 3D Zoetropes use.

An interesting variation of the zoetrope principle where the camera shutter is used instead of slits or strobes to freeze the motion. The downside (or potentially part of the attraction) is that the viewer needs to watch through a machine to experience the desired effect.

Jim le Ferve of Nexus Productions writes:

In March 2007 at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London we hosted an evening of animation related events which I took as an opportunity to make some more examples of my Phonographantasmascope, psychiatrist
an extension of the Zoetrope principle.

It is all live action and works by using the shutter speed of the camera rather than the rather irritating stroboscope methods other 3D Zoetropes use.

An interesting variation of the zoetrope principle where the camera shutter is used instead of slits or strobes to freeze the motion. The downside (or potentially part of the attraction) is that the viewer needs to watch through a machine to experience the desired effect.

Jim le Ferve of Nexus Productions writes:

In March 2007 at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London we hosted an evening of animation related events which I took as an opportunity to make some more examples of my Phonographantasmascope, there
an extension of the Zoetrope principle.

It is all live action and works by using the shutter speed of the camera rather than the rather irritating stroboscope methods other 3D Zoetropes use.

An interesting variation of the zoetrope principle where the camera shutter is used instead of slits or strobes to freeze the motion. The downside (or potentially part of the attraction) is that the viewer needs to watch through a machine to experience the desired effect.



Jim le Ferve of Nexus Productions writes:

In March 2007 at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London we hosted an evening of animation related events which I took as an opportunity to make some more examples of my Phonographantasmascope, psychiatrist
an extension of the Zoetrope principle.

It is all live action and works by using the shutter speed of the camera rather than the rather irritating stroboscope methods other 3D Zoetropes use.

An interesting variation of the zoetrope principle where the camera shutter is used instead of slits or strobes to freeze the motion. The downside (or potentially part of the attraction) is that the viewer needs to watch through a machine to experience the desired effect.



Jim le Ferve of Nexus Productions writes:

In March 2007 at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London we hosted an evening of animation related events which I took as an opportunity to make some more examples of my Phonographantasmascope, noun
an extension of the Zoetrope principle.

It is all live action and works by using the shutter speed of the camera rather than the rather irritating stroboscope methods other 3D Zoetropes use.



Gijs Gieskes has made many wonderful machines from gameboys or other machines which he’s circuitbent.

He writes about the Acid Machine:

The circle with the lines that you see on the top of the machine, and rotates and displays the note you are playing.
When you play a C the lines in the middle circle will be standing still.. from the C it will go outward, displaying all notes on a keyboard in 12 steps.

It works by making a LED blink in the frequency of the sound, and rotating the image at a set speed.

more information here

(thanks, kevin!)


Gijs Gieskes has made many wonderful machines from gameboys or other machines which he’s circuitbent.

He writes about the Acid Machine:

The circle with the lines that you see on the top of the machine, abortion rotates and displays the note you are playing.
When you play a C the lines in the middle circle will be standing still.. from the C it will go outward, treatment displaying all notes on a keyboard in 12 steps.

It works by making a LED blink in the frequency of the sound, and rotating the image at a set speed.

more information here

(thanks, kevin!)


Gijs Gieskes has made many wonderful machines from gameboys or other machines which he’s circuitbent.

He writes about the Acid Machine:

The circle with the lines that you see on the top of the machine, capsule rotates and displays the note you are playing.
When you play a C the lines in the middle circle will be standing still.. from the C it will go outward, displaying all notes on a keyboard in 12 steps.

It works by making a LED blink in the frequency of the sound, and rotating the image at a set speed.

more information here

(thanks, kevin!)








In the second video you can see how he can use foot pedals to change the chord.








In the second video you can see how he can use foot pedals to change the chord.
An interesting variation of the zoetrope principle where the camera shutter is used instead of slits or strobes to freeze the motion. The downside (or potentially part of the attraction) is that the viewer needs to watch through a machine to experience the desired effect.




Jim le Ferve of Nexus Productions writes:

In March 2007 at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London we hosted an evening of animation related events which I took as an opportunity to make some more examples of my Phonographantasmascope, rx
an extension of the Zoetrope principle.

It is all live action and works by using the shutter speed of the camera rather than the rather irritating stroboscope methods other 3D Zoetropes use.








In the second video you can see how he can use foot pedals to change the chord.
An interesting variation of the zoetrope principle where the camera shutter is used instead of slits or strobes to freeze the motion. The downside (or potentially part of the attraction) is that the viewer needs to watch through a machine to experience the desired effect.




Jim le Ferve of Nexus Productions writes:

In March 2007 at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London we hosted an evening of animation related events which I took as an opportunity to make some more examples of my Phonographantasmascope, rx
an extension of the Zoetrope principle.

It is all live action and works by using the shutter speed of the camera rather than the rather irritating stroboscope methods other 3D Zoetropes use.

An interesting variation of the zoetrope principle where the camera shutter is used instead of slits or strobes to freeze the motion. The downside (or potentially part of the attraction) is that the viewer needs to watch through a machine to experience the desired effect.

Jim le Ferve of Nexus Productions writes:

In March 2007 at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London we hosted an evening of animation related events which I took as an opportunity to make some more examples of my Phonographantasmascope, psychiatrist
an extension of the Zoetrope principle.

It is all live action and works by using the shutter speed of the camera rather than the rather irritating stroboscope methods other 3D Zoetropes use.








In the second video you can see how he can use foot pedals to change the chord.
An interesting variation of the zoetrope principle where the camera shutter is used instead of slits or strobes to freeze the motion. The downside (or potentially part of the attraction) is that the viewer needs to watch through a machine to experience the desired effect.




Jim le Ferve of Nexus Productions writes:

In March 2007 at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London we hosted an evening of animation related events which I took as an opportunity to make some more examples of my Phonographantasmascope, rx
an extension of the Zoetrope principle.

It is all live action and works by using the shutter speed of the camera rather than the rather irritating stroboscope methods other 3D Zoetropes use.

An interesting variation of the zoetrope principle where the camera shutter is used instead of slits or strobes to freeze the motion. The downside (or potentially part of the attraction) is that the viewer needs to watch through a machine to experience the desired effect.

Jim le Ferve of Nexus Productions writes:

In March 2007 at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London we hosted an evening of animation related events which I took as an opportunity to make some more examples of my Phonographantasmascope, psychiatrist
an extension of the Zoetrope principle.

It is all live action and works by using the shutter speed of the camera rather than the rather irritating stroboscope methods other 3D Zoetropes use.

An interesting variation of the zoetrope principle where the camera shutter is used instead of slits or strobes to freeze the motion. The downside (or potentially part of the attraction) is that the viewer needs to watch through a machine to experience the desired effect.

Jim le Ferve of Nexus Productions writes:

In March 2007 at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London we hosted an evening of animation related events which I took as an opportunity to make some more examples of my Phonographantasmascope, there
an extension of the Zoetrope principle.

It is all live action and works by using the shutter speed of the camera rather than the rather irritating stroboscope methods other 3D Zoetropes use.








In the second video you can see how he can use foot pedals to change the chord.
An interesting variation of the zoetrope principle where the camera shutter is used instead of slits or strobes to freeze the motion. The downside (or potentially part of the attraction) is that the viewer needs to watch through a machine to experience the desired effect.




Jim le Ferve of Nexus Productions writes:

In March 2007 at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London we hosted an evening of animation related events which I took as an opportunity to make some more examples of my Phonographantasmascope, rx
an extension of the Zoetrope principle.

It is all live action and works by using the shutter speed of the camera rather than the rather irritating stroboscope methods other 3D Zoetropes use.

An interesting variation of the zoetrope principle where the camera shutter is used instead of slits or strobes to freeze the motion. The downside (or potentially part of the attraction) is that the viewer needs to watch through a machine to experience the desired effect.

Jim le Ferve of Nexus Productions writes:

In March 2007 at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London we hosted an evening of animation related events which I took as an opportunity to make some more examples of my Phonographantasmascope, psychiatrist
an extension of the Zoetrope principle.

It is all live action and works by using the shutter speed of the camera rather than the rather irritating stroboscope methods other 3D Zoetropes use.

An interesting variation of the zoetrope principle where the camera shutter is used instead of slits or strobes to freeze the motion. The downside (or potentially part of the attraction) is that the viewer needs to watch through a machine to experience the desired effect.

Jim le Ferve of Nexus Productions writes:

In March 2007 at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London we hosted an evening of animation related events which I took as an opportunity to make some more examples of my Phonographantasmascope, there
an extension of the Zoetrope principle.

It is all live action and works by using the shutter speed of the camera rather than the rather irritating stroboscope methods other 3D Zoetropes use.

An interesting variation of the zoetrope principle where the camera shutter is used instead of slits or strobes to freeze the motion. The downside (or potentially part of the attraction) is that the viewer needs to watch through a machine to experience the desired effect.



Jim le Ferve of Nexus Productions writes:

In March 2007 at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London we hosted an evening of animation related events which I took as an opportunity to make some more examples of my Phonographantasmascope, psychiatrist
an extension of the Zoetrope principle.

It is all live action and works by using the shutter speed of the camera rather than the rather irritating stroboscope methods other 3D Zoetropes use.








In the second video you can see how he can use foot pedals to change the chord.
An interesting variation of the zoetrope principle where the camera shutter is used instead of slits or strobes to freeze the motion. The downside (or potentially part of the attraction) is that the viewer needs to watch through a machine to experience the desired effect.




Jim le Ferve of Nexus Productions writes:

In March 2007 at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London we hosted an evening of animation related events which I took as an opportunity to make some more examples of my Phonographantasmascope, rx
an extension of the Zoetrope principle.

It is all live action and works by using the shutter speed of the camera rather than the rather irritating stroboscope methods other 3D Zoetropes use.

An interesting variation of the zoetrope principle where the camera shutter is used instead of slits or strobes to freeze the motion. The downside (or potentially part of the attraction) is that the viewer needs to watch through a machine to experience the desired effect.

Jim le Ferve of Nexus Productions writes:

In March 2007 at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London we hosted an evening of animation related events which I took as an opportunity to make some more examples of my Phonographantasmascope, psychiatrist
an extension of the Zoetrope principle.

It is all live action and works by using the shutter speed of the camera rather than the rather irritating stroboscope methods other 3D Zoetropes use.

An interesting variation of the zoetrope principle where the camera shutter is used instead of slits or strobes to freeze the motion. The downside (or potentially part of the attraction) is that the viewer needs to watch through a machine to experience the desired effect.

Jim le Ferve of Nexus Productions writes:

In March 2007 at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London we hosted an evening of animation related events which I took as an opportunity to make some more examples of my Phonographantasmascope, there
an extension of the Zoetrope principle.

It is all live action and works by using the shutter speed of the camera rather than the rather irritating stroboscope methods other 3D Zoetropes use.

An interesting variation of the zoetrope principle where the camera shutter is used instead of slits or strobes to freeze the motion. The downside (or potentially part of the attraction) is that the viewer needs to watch through a machine to experience the desired effect.



Jim le Ferve of Nexus Productions writes:

In March 2007 at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London we hosted an evening of animation related events which I took as an opportunity to make some more examples of my Phonographantasmascope, psychiatrist
an extension of the Zoetrope principle.

It is all live action and works by using the shutter speed of the camera rather than the rather irritating stroboscope methods other 3D Zoetropes use.

An interesting variation of the zoetrope principle where the camera shutter is used instead of slits or strobes to freeze the motion. The downside (or potentially part of the attraction) is that the viewer needs to watch through a machine to experience the desired effect.



Jim le Ferve of Nexus Productions writes:

In March 2007 at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London we hosted an evening of animation related events which I took as an opportunity to make some more examples of my Phonographantasmascope, noun
an extension of the Zoetrope principle.

It is all live action and works by using the shutter speed of the camera rather than the rather irritating stroboscope methods other 3D Zoetropes use.



Gijs Gieskes has made many wonderful machines from gameboys or other machines which he’s circuitbent.

He writes about the Acid Machine:

The circle with the lines that you see on the top of the machine, and rotates and displays the note you are playing.
When you play a C the lines in the middle circle will be standing still.. from the C it will go outward, displaying all notes on a keyboard in 12 steps.

It works by making a LED blink in the frequency of the sound, and rotating the image at a set speed.

more information here

(thanks, kevin!)


Gijs Gieskes has made many wonderful machines from gameboys or other machines which he’s circuitbent.

He writes about the Acid Machine:

The circle with the lines that you see on the top of the machine, abortion rotates and displays the note you are playing.
When you play a C the lines in the middle circle will be standing still.. from the C it will go outward, treatment displaying all notes on a keyboard in 12 steps.

It works by making a LED blink in the frequency of the sound, and rotating the image at a set speed.

more information here

(thanks, kevin!)


Gijs Gieskes has made many wonderful machines from gameboys or other machines which he’s circuitbent.

He writes about the Acid Machine:

The circle with the lines that you see on the top of the machine, capsule rotates and displays the note you are playing.
When you play a C the lines in the middle circle will be standing still.. from the C it will go outward, displaying all notes on a keyboard in 12 steps.

It works by making a LED blink in the frequency of the sound, and rotating the image at a set speed.

more information here

(thanks, kevin!)


Gijs Gieskes has made many wonderful machines from gameboys or other machines which he’s circuitbent.

He writes about the Acid Machine:

The circle with the lines that you see on the top of the machine, capsule rotates and displays the note you are playing.
When you play a C the lines in the middle circle will be standing still.. from the C it will go outward, displaying all notes on a keyboard in 12 steps.

It works by making a LED blink in the frequency of the sound, and rotating the image at a set speed.

more information here

(thanks, kevin!)



Metamorphosis from Glenn Marshall on Vimeo.



Music Is Math from Glenn Marshall on Vimeo.

Glenn Marshall writes programs that (sometimes) take music as an input and produces spectacular results. From the page for the top video:

Metamorphosis is programmed entirely in Processing, pill
it’s the follow up to my Music is Math video. I developed my ‘zeno’ animation system a bit more to allow for nebulous additive blending as well as a few other things. The music is by Boards of Canada again – the track ‘Corsair’ from the Geogaddi album.

He writes about the second video, information pills
Music is Math:

I just let the program run till the end of the music, pill
I felt reluctant to interfere too much by trying to sculpt an ending, and just let the code run its own natural course.

see all his vimeo videos here and more information on butterfly.ie

Possibly Related Posts:


Phonographantasmascope

Monday, October 13th, 2008








In the second video you can see how he can use foot pedals to change the chord.








In the second video you can see how he can use foot pedals to change the chord.








In the second video you can see how he can use foot pedals to change the chord.








In the second video you can see how he can use foot pedals to change the chord.
An interesting variation of the zoetrope principle where the camera shutter is used instead of slits or strobes to freeze the motion. The downside (or potentially part of the attraction) is that the viewer needs to watch through a machine to experience the desired effect.




Jim le Ferve of Nexus Productions writes:

In March 2007 at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London we hosted an evening of animation related events which I took as an opportunity to make some more examples of my Phonographantasmascope, rx
an extension of the Zoetrope principle.

It is all live action and works by using the shutter speed of the camera rather than the rather irritating stroboscope methods other 3D Zoetropes use.

Possibly Related Posts:


Saturn V launch views

Wednesday, October 8th, 2008

Eadweard Muybridge was hired by Leland Stanford to answer the question if a horse had all four legs in the air at any time at a full gallop. Although in 1878 he had already proved this with a single photograph the following year he devised a more elaborate setup with twenty-four cameras setup over a twenty foot length triggered by the horse’s hoofs as it galloped past. The resulting photographs were widely published (and later the basis for a book by Stanford) and a popular culture sensation.

A585ECBA-02D2-4601-87C1-990CD7B04A3D.jpg

Realizing that he was onto something, here Eadweard invented the Zoopraxiscope which projected images from a rotating glass disk to give the impression of motion – creating the first movie projector.

In 2008 Mitchell f Chan and Brad Hindson created A Dream of Pastures funded by Ontario Arts Council to be exhibited on the exterior of the Art Gallery of Ontario for Toronto’s Nuit Blanche All-Night contemporary art festival.


view 0,40,0″>


Mitchell says:

A Dream of Pastures is an interactive outdoor sculpture and animated light projection. On the exterior wall of the Art Gallery of Ontario, the ghostly form of a horse glows on the shadowy brick. On the ground several meters in front of it, a stationary bicycle beckons for investigation from the viewer.

As the viewer pedals the bicycle, he discovers that the phantom horse moves accordingly, animated by a mysterious system of projecting lights and turning gears. The viewer pedals more vigorously, the gears rotate more quickly, and the horse of light breaks into a gallop. Sitting in the saddle, the viewer creates a shadow that lines up with the horse, casting himself as a jockey in the projected world, galloping through the empty pastures of a fictitious world at an exhilarating pace.

It’s not clear to me if the connection is intentional or coincidence, but I’d like to think it’s a modern interactive interpretation of an important historical moment.

More information here

Eadweard Muybridge was hired by Leland Stanford to answer the question if a horse had all four legs in the air at any time at a full gallop. Although in 1878 he had already proved this with a single photograph the following year he devised a more elaborate setup with twenty-four cameras setup over a twenty foot length triggered by the horse’s hoofs as it galloped past. The resulting photographs were widely published (and later the basis for a book by Stanford) and a popular culture sensation.

A585ECBA-02D2-4601-87C1-990CD7B04A3D.jpg

Realizing that he was onto something, here Eadweard invented the Zoopraxiscope which projected images from a rotating glass disk to give the impression of motion – creating the first movie projector.

In 2008 Mitchell f Chan and Brad Hindson created A Dream of Pastures funded by Ontario Arts Council to be exhibited on the exterior of the Art Gallery of Ontario for Toronto’s Nuit Blanche All-Night contemporary art festival.


view 0,40,0″>


Mitchell says:

A Dream of Pastures is an interactive outdoor sculpture and animated light projection. On the exterior wall of the Art Gallery of Ontario, the ghostly form of a horse glows on the shadowy brick. On the ground several meters in front of it, a stationary bicycle beckons for investigation from the viewer.

As the viewer pedals the bicycle, he discovers that the phantom horse moves accordingly, animated by a mysterious system of projecting lights and turning gears. The viewer pedals more vigorously, the gears rotate more quickly, and the horse of light breaks into a gallop. Sitting in the saddle, the viewer creates a shadow that lines up with the horse, casting himself as a jockey in the projected world, galloping through the empty pastures of a fictitious world at an exhilarating pace.

It’s not clear to me if the connection is intentional or coincidence, but I’d like to think it’s a modern interactive interpretation of an important historical moment.

More information here

Eadweard Muybridge was hired by Leland Stanford to answer the question if a horse had all four legs in the air at any time at a full gallop. Although in 1878 he had already proved this with a single photograph the following year he devised a more elaborate setup with twenty-four cameras setup over a twenty foot length triggered by the horse’s hoofs as it galloped past. The resulting photographs were widely published (and later the basis for a book by Stanford) and a popular culture sensation.

A585ECBA-02D2-4601-87C1-990CD7B04A3D.jpg

Realizing that he was onto something, here Eadweard invented the Zoopraxiscope which projected images from a rotating glass disk to give the impression of motion – creating the first movie projector.

In 2008 Mitchell f Chan and Brad Hindson created A Dream of Pastures funded by Ontario Arts Council to be exhibited on the exterior of the Art Gallery of Ontario for Toronto’s Nuit Blanche All-Night contemporary art festival.


view 0,40,0″>


Mitchell says:

A Dream of Pastures is an interactive outdoor sculpture and animated light projection. On the exterior wall of the Art Gallery of Ontario, the ghostly form of a horse glows on the shadowy brick. On the ground several meters in front of it, a stationary bicycle beckons for investigation from the viewer.

As the viewer pedals the bicycle, he discovers that the phantom horse moves accordingly, animated by a mysterious system of projecting lights and turning gears. The viewer pedals more vigorously, the gears rotate more quickly, and the horse of light breaks into a gallop. Sitting in the saddle, the viewer creates a shadow that lines up with the horse, casting himself as a jockey in the projected world, galloping through the empty pastures of a fictitious world at an exhilarating pace.

It’s not clear to me if the connection is intentional or coincidence, but I’d like to think it’s a modern interactive interpretation of an important historical moment.

More information here

In 1878 Eadweard Muybridge was hired by Leland Stanford to answer the question if a horse had all four legs in the air at any time at a full gallop. Although he had already proved the point with a single photograph the following year he devised a more elaborate setup with twenty-four cameras setup over a twenty foot length triggered by the horse’s hoofs as it galloped past. The resulting photographs were widely published (and later the basis for a book by Stanford) and a sensation.

A585ECBA-02D2-4601-87C1-990CD7B04A3D.jpg

Realizing that he was onto something, cystitis Eadweard invented the Zoopraxiscope which projected images from a rotating glass disk to give the impression of motion – creating the first movie projector.

In 2008 Mitchell f Chan and Brad Hindson created A Dream of Pastures for the Ontario Arts Council.




A Dream of Pastures is an interactive outdoor sculpture and animated light projection. On the exterior wall of the Art Gallery of Ontario, pharm the ghostly form of a horse glows on the shadowy brick. On the ground several meters in front of it, a stationary bicycle beckons for investigation from the viewer.

As the viewer pedals the bicycle, he discovers that the phantom horse moves accordingly, animated by a mysterious system of projecting lights and turning gears. The viewer pedals more vigorously, the gears rotate more quickly, and the horse of light breaks into a gallop. Sitting in the saddle, the viewer creates a shadow that lines up with the horse, casting himself as a jockey in the projected world, galloping through the empty pastures of a fictitious world at an exhilarating pace.

Eadweard Muybridge was hired by Leland Stanford to answer the question if a horse had all four legs in the air at any time at a full gallop. Although in 1878 he had already proved this with a single photograph the following year he devised a more elaborate setup with twenty-four cameras setup over a twenty foot length triggered by the horse’s hoofs as it galloped past. The resulting photographs were widely published (and later the basis for a book by Stanford) and a popular culture sensation.

A585ECBA-02D2-4601-87C1-990CD7B04A3D.jpg

Realizing that he was onto something, here Eadweard invented the Zoopraxiscope which projected images from a rotating glass disk to give the impression of motion – creating the first movie projector.

In 2008 Mitchell f Chan and Brad Hindson created A Dream of Pastures funded by Ontario Arts Council to be exhibited on the exterior of the Art Gallery of Ontario for Toronto’s Nuit Blanche All-Night contemporary art festival.


view 0,40,0″>


Mitchell says:

A Dream of Pastures is an interactive outdoor sculpture and animated light projection. On the exterior wall of the Art Gallery of Ontario, the ghostly form of a horse glows on the shadowy brick. On the ground several meters in front of it, a stationary bicycle beckons for investigation from the viewer.

As the viewer pedals the bicycle, he discovers that the phantom horse moves accordingly, animated by a mysterious system of projecting lights and turning gears. The viewer pedals more vigorously, the gears rotate more quickly, and the horse of light breaks into a gallop. Sitting in the saddle, the viewer creates a shadow that lines up with the horse, casting himself as a jockey in the projected world, galloping through the empty pastures of a fictitious world at an exhilarating pace.

It’s not clear to me if the connection is intentional or coincidence, but I’d like to think it’s a modern interactive interpretation of an important historical moment.

More information here

Eadweard Muybridge was hired by Leland Stanford to answer the question if a horse had all four legs in the air at any time at a full gallop. Although in 1878 he had already proved this with a single photograph the following year he devised a more elaborate setup with twenty-four cameras setup over a twenty foot length triggered by the horse’s hoofs as it galloped past. The resulting photographs were widely published (and later the basis for a book by Stanford) and a popular culture sensation.

A585ECBA-02D2-4601-87C1-990CD7B04A3D.jpg

Realizing that he was onto something, here Eadweard invented the Zoopraxiscope which projected images from a rotating glass disk to give the impression of motion – creating the first movie projector.

In 2008 Mitchell f Chan and Brad Hindson created A Dream of Pastures funded by Ontario Arts Council to be exhibited on the exterior of the Art Gallery of Ontario for Toronto’s Nuit Blanche All-Night contemporary art festival.


view 0,40,0″>


Mitchell says:

A Dream of Pastures is an interactive outdoor sculpture and animated light projection. On the exterior wall of the Art Gallery of Ontario, the ghostly form of a horse glows on the shadowy brick. On the ground several meters in front of it, a stationary bicycle beckons for investigation from the viewer.

As the viewer pedals the bicycle, he discovers that the phantom horse moves accordingly, animated by a mysterious system of projecting lights and turning gears. The viewer pedals more vigorously, the gears rotate more quickly, and the horse of light breaks into a gallop. Sitting in the saddle, the viewer creates a shadow that lines up with the horse, casting himself as a jockey in the projected world, galloping through the empty pastures of a fictitious world at an exhilarating pace.

It’s not clear to me if the connection is intentional or coincidence, but I’d like to think it’s a modern interactive interpretation of an important historical moment.

More information here

In 1878 Eadweard Muybridge was hired by Leland Stanford to answer the question if a horse had all four legs in the air at any time at a full gallop. Although he had already proved the point with a single photograph the following year he devised a more elaborate setup with twenty-four cameras setup over a twenty foot length triggered by the horse’s hoofs as it galloped past. The resulting photographs were widely published (and later the basis for a book by Stanford) and a sensation.

A585ECBA-02D2-4601-87C1-990CD7B04A3D.jpg

Realizing that he was onto something, cystitis Eadweard invented the Zoopraxiscope which projected images from a rotating glass disk to give the impression of motion – creating the first movie projector.

In 2008 Mitchell f Chan and Brad Hindson created A Dream of Pastures for the Ontario Arts Council.




A Dream of Pastures is an interactive outdoor sculpture and animated light projection. On the exterior wall of the Art Gallery of Ontario, pharm the ghostly form of a horse glows on the shadowy brick. On the ground several meters in front of it, a stationary bicycle beckons for investigation from the viewer.

As the viewer pedals the bicycle, he discovers that the phantom horse moves accordingly, animated by a mysterious system of projecting lights and turning gears. The viewer pedals more vigorously, the gears rotate more quickly, and the horse of light breaks into a gallop. Sitting in the saddle, the viewer creates a shadow that lines up with the horse, casting himself as a jockey in the projected world, galloping through the empty pastures of a fictitious world at an exhilarating pace.

Eadweard Muybridge was hired by Leland Stanford to answer the question if a horse had all four legs in the air at any time at a full gallop. Although in 1878 he had already proved this with a single photograph the following year he devised a more elaborate setup with twenty-four cameras setup over a twenty foot length triggered by the horse’s hoofs as it galloped past. The resulting photographs were widely published (and later the basis for a book by Stanford) and a popular culture sensation.

A585ECBA-02D2-4601-87C1-990CD7B04A3D.jpg

Realizing that he was onto something, here Eadweard invented the Zoopraxiscope which projected images from a rotating glass disk to give the impression of motion – creating the first movie projector.

In 2008 Mitchell f Chan and Brad Hindson created A Dream of Pastures funded by Ontario Arts Council to be exhibited on the exterior of the Art Gallery of Ontario for Toronto’s Nuit Blanche All-Night contemporary art festival.


view 0,40,0″>


Mitchell says:

A Dream of Pastures is an interactive outdoor sculpture and animated light projection. On the exterior wall of the Art Gallery of Ontario, the ghostly form of a horse glows on the shadowy brick. On the ground several meters in front of it, a stationary bicycle beckons for investigation from the viewer.

As the viewer pedals the bicycle, he discovers that the phantom horse moves accordingly, animated by a mysterious system of projecting lights and turning gears. The viewer pedals more vigorously, the gears rotate more quickly, and the horse of light breaks into a gallop. Sitting in the saddle, the viewer creates a shadow that lines up with the horse, casting himself as a jockey in the projected world, galloping through the empty pastures of a fictitious world at an exhilarating pace.

It’s not clear to me if the connection is intentional or coincidence, but I’d like to think it’s a modern interactive interpretation of an important historical moment.

More information here

In 1878 Eadweard Muybridge was hired by Leland Stanford to answer the question if a horse had all four legs in the air at any time at a full gallop. Although he had already proved the point with a single photograph the following year he devised a more elaborate setup with twenty-four cameras setup over a twenty foot length triggered by the horse’s hoofs as it galloped past. The resulting photographs were widely published (and later the basis for a book by Stanford) and a sensation.

A585ECBA-02D2-4601-87C1-990CD7B04A3D.jpg

Realizing that he was onto something, cystitis Eadweard invented the Zoopraxiscope which projected images from a rotating glass disk to give the impression of motion – creating the first movie projector.

In 2008 Mitchell f Chan and Brad Hindson created A Dream of Pastures for the Ontario Arts Council.




A Dream of Pastures is an interactive outdoor sculpture and animated light projection. On the exterior wall of the Art Gallery of Ontario, pharm the ghostly form of a horse glows on the shadowy brick. On the ground several meters in front of it, a stationary bicycle beckons for investigation from the viewer.

As the viewer pedals the bicycle, he discovers that the phantom horse moves accordingly, animated by a mysterious system of projecting lights and turning gears. The viewer pedals more vigorously, the gears rotate more quickly, and the horse of light breaks into a gallop. Sitting in the saddle, the viewer creates a shadow that lines up with the horse, casting himself as a jockey in the projected world, galloping through the empty pastures of a fictitious world at an exhilarating pace.

In 1878 Eadweard Muybridge was hired by Leland Stanford to answer the question if a horse had all four legs in the air at any time at a full gallop. Although he had already proved the point with a single photograph the following year he devised a more elaborate setup with twenty-four cameras setup over a twenty foot length triggered by the horse’s hoofs as it galloped past. The resulting photographs were widely published (and later the basis for a book by Stanford) and a sensation.

A585ECBA-02D2-4601-87C1-990CD7B04A3D.jpg

Realizing that he was onto something, sick Eadweard invented the Zoopraxiscope which projected images from a rotating glass disk to give the impression of motion – creating the first movie projector.

In 2008 Mitchell f Chan and Brad Hindson created A Dream of Pastures for the Ontario Arts Council.




A Dream of Pastures is an interactive outdoor sculpture and animated light projection. On the exterior wall of the Art Gallery of Ontario, treatment the ghostly form of a horse glows on the shadowy brick. On the ground several meters in front of it, information pills a stationary bicycle beckons for investigation from the viewer.

As the viewer pedals the bicycle, he discovers that the phantom horse moves accordingly, animated by a mysterious system of projecting lights and turning gears. The viewer pedals more vigorously, the gears rotate more quickly, and the horse of light breaks into a gallop. Sitting in the saddle, the viewer creates a shadow that lines up with the horse, casting himself as a jockey in the projected world, galloping through the empty pastures of a fictitious world at an exhilarating pace.

Eadweard Muybridge was hired by Leland Stanford to answer the question if a horse had all four legs in the air at any time at a full gallop. Although in 1878 he had already proved this with a single photograph the following year he devised a more elaborate setup with twenty-four cameras setup over a twenty foot length triggered by the horse’s hoofs as it galloped past. The resulting photographs were widely published (and later the basis for a book by Stanford) and a popular culture sensation.

A585ECBA-02D2-4601-87C1-990CD7B04A3D.jpg

Realizing that he was onto something, here Eadweard invented the Zoopraxiscope which projected images from a rotating glass disk to give the impression of motion – creating the first movie projector.

In 2008 Mitchell f Chan and Brad Hindson created A Dream of Pastures funded by Ontario Arts Council to be exhibited on the exterior of the Art Gallery of Ontario for Toronto’s Nuit Blanche All-Night contemporary art festival.


view 0,40,0″>


Mitchell says:

A Dream of Pastures is an interactive outdoor sculpture and animated light projection. On the exterior wall of the Art Gallery of Ontario, the ghostly form of a horse glows on the shadowy brick. On the ground several meters in front of it, a stationary bicycle beckons for investigation from the viewer.

As the viewer pedals the bicycle, he discovers that the phantom horse moves accordingly, animated by a mysterious system of projecting lights and turning gears. The viewer pedals more vigorously, the gears rotate more quickly, and the horse of light breaks into a gallop. Sitting in the saddle, the viewer creates a shadow that lines up with the horse, casting himself as a jockey in the projected world, galloping through the empty pastures of a fictitious world at an exhilarating pace.

It’s not clear to me if the connection is intentional or coincidence, but I’d like to think it’s a modern interactive interpretation of an important historical moment.

More information here

Eadweard Muybridge was hired by Leland Stanford to answer the question if a horse had all four legs in the air at any time at a full gallop. Although in 1878 he had already proved this with a single photograph the following year he devised a more elaborate setup with twenty-four cameras setup over a twenty foot length triggered by the horse’s hoofs as it galloped past. The resulting photographs were widely published (and later the basis for a book by Stanford) and a popular culture sensation.

A585ECBA-02D2-4601-87C1-990CD7B04A3D.jpg

Realizing that he was onto something, here Eadweard invented the Zoopraxiscope which projected images from a rotating glass disk to give the impression of motion – creating the first movie projector.

In 2008 Mitchell f Chan and Brad Hindson created A Dream of Pastures funded by Ontario Arts Council to be exhibited on the exterior of the Art Gallery of Ontario for Toronto’s Nuit Blanche All-Night contemporary art festival.


view 0,40,0″>


Mitchell says:

A Dream of Pastures is an interactive outdoor sculpture and animated light projection. On the exterior wall of the Art Gallery of Ontario, the ghostly form of a horse glows on the shadowy brick. On the ground several meters in front of it, a stationary bicycle beckons for investigation from the viewer.

As the viewer pedals the bicycle, he discovers that the phantom horse moves accordingly, animated by a mysterious system of projecting lights and turning gears. The viewer pedals more vigorously, the gears rotate more quickly, and the horse of light breaks into a gallop. Sitting in the saddle, the viewer creates a shadow that lines up with the horse, casting himself as a jockey in the projected world, galloping through the empty pastures of a fictitious world at an exhilarating pace.

It’s not clear to me if the connection is intentional or coincidence, but I’d like to think it’s a modern interactive interpretation of an important historical moment.

More information here

In 1878 Eadweard Muybridge was hired by Leland Stanford to answer the question if a horse had all four legs in the air at any time at a full gallop. Although he had already proved the point with a single photograph the following year he devised a more elaborate setup with twenty-four cameras setup over a twenty foot length triggered by the horse’s hoofs as it galloped past. The resulting photographs were widely published (and later the basis for a book by Stanford) and a sensation.

A585ECBA-02D2-4601-87C1-990CD7B04A3D.jpg

Realizing that he was onto something, cystitis Eadweard invented the Zoopraxiscope which projected images from a rotating glass disk to give the impression of motion – creating the first movie projector.

In 2008 Mitchell f Chan and Brad Hindson created A Dream of Pastures for the Ontario Arts Council.




A Dream of Pastures is an interactive outdoor sculpture and animated light projection. On the exterior wall of the Art Gallery of Ontario, pharm the ghostly form of a horse glows on the shadowy brick. On the ground several meters in front of it, a stationary bicycle beckons for investigation from the viewer.

As the viewer pedals the bicycle, he discovers that the phantom horse moves accordingly, animated by a mysterious system of projecting lights and turning gears. The viewer pedals more vigorously, the gears rotate more quickly, and the horse of light breaks into a gallop. Sitting in the saddle, the viewer creates a shadow that lines up with the horse, casting himself as a jockey in the projected world, galloping through the empty pastures of a fictitious world at an exhilarating pace.

Eadweard Muybridge was hired by Leland Stanford to answer the question if a horse had all four legs in the air at any time at a full gallop. Although in 1878 he had already proved this with a single photograph the following year he devised a more elaborate setup with twenty-four cameras setup over a twenty foot length triggered by the horse’s hoofs as it galloped past. The resulting photographs were widely published (and later the basis for a book by Stanford) and a popular culture sensation.

A585ECBA-02D2-4601-87C1-990CD7B04A3D.jpg

Realizing that he was onto something, here Eadweard invented the Zoopraxiscope which projected images from a rotating glass disk to give the impression of motion – creating the first movie projector.

In 2008 Mitchell f Chan and Brad Hindson created A Dream of Pastures funded by Ontario Arts Council to be exhibited on the exterior of the Art Gallery of Ontario for Toronto’s Nuit Blanche All-Night contemporary art festival.


view 0,40,0″>


Mitchell says:

A Dream of Pastures is an interactive outdoor sculpture and animated light projection. On the exterior wall of the Art Gallery of Ontario, the ghostly form of a horse glows on the shadowy brick. On the ground several meters in front of it, a stationary bicycle beckons for investigation from the viewer.

As the viewer pedals the bicycle, he discovers that the phantom horse moves accordingly, animated by a mysterious system of projecting lights and turning gears. The viewer pedals more vigorously, the gears rotate more quickly, and the horse of light breaks into a gallop. Sitting in the saddle, the viewer creates a shadow that lines up with the horse, casting himself as a jockey in the projected world, galloping through the empty pastures of a fictitious world at an exhilarating pace.

It’s not clear to me if the connection is intentional or coincidence, but I’d like to think it’s a modern interactive interpretation of an important historical moment.

More information here

In 1878 Eadweard Muybridge was hired by Leland Stanford to answer the question if a horse had all four legs in the air at any time at a full gallop. Although he had already proved the point with a single photograph the following year he devised a more elaborate setup with twenty-four cameras setup over a twenty foot length triggered by the horse’s hoofs as it galloped past. The resulting photographs were widely published (and later the basis for a book by Stanford) and a sensation.

A585ECBA-02D2-4601-87C1-990CD7B04A3D.jpg

Realizing that he was onto something, cystitis Eadweard invented the Zoopraxiscope which projected images from a rotating glass disk to give the impression of motion – creating the first movie projector.

In 2008 Mitchell f Chan and Brad Hindson created A Dream of Pastures for the Ontario Arts Council.




A Dream of Pastures is an interactive outdoor sculpture and animated light projection. On the exterior wall of the Art Gallery of Ontario, pharm the ghostly form of a horse glows on the shadowy brick. On the ground several meters in front of it, a stationary bicycle beckons for investigation from the viewer.

As the viewer pedals the bicycle, he discovers that the phantom horse moves accordingly, animated by a mysterious system of projecting lights and turning gears. The viewer pedals more vigorously, the gears rotate more quickly, and the horse of light breaks into a gallop. Sitting in the saddle, the viewer creates a shadow that lines up with the horse, casting himself as a jockey in the projected world, galloping through the empty pastures of a fictitious world at an exhilarating pace.

In 1878 Eadweard Muybridge was hired by Leland Stanford to answer the question if a horse had all four legs in the air at any time at a full gallop. Although he had already proved the point with a single photograph the following year he devised a more elaborate setup with twenty-four cameras setup over a twenty foot length triggered by the horse’s hoofs as it galloped past. The resulting photographs were widely published (and later the basis for a book by Stanford) and a sensation.

A585ECBA-02D2-4601-87C1-990CD7B04A3D.jpg

Realizing that he was onto something, sick Eadweard invented the Zoopraxiscope which projected images from a rotating glass disk to give the impression of motion – creating the first movie projector.

In 2008 Mitchell f Chan and Brad Hindson created A Dream of Pastures for the Ontario Arts Council.




A Dream of Pastures is an interactive outdoor sculpture and animated light projection. On the exterior wall of the Art Gallery of Ontario, treatment the ghostly form of a horse glows on the shadowy brick. On the ground several meters in front of it, information pills a stationary bicycle beckons for investigation from the viewer.

As the viewer pedals the bicycle, he discovers that the phantom horse moves accordingly, animated by a mysterious system of projecting lights and turning gears. The viewer pedals more vigorously, the gears rotate more quickly, and the horse of light breaks into a gallop. Sitting in the saddle, the viewer creates a shadow that lines up with the horse, casting himself as a jockey in the projected world, galloping through the empty pastures of a fictitious world at an exhilarating pace.

Eadweard Muybridge was hired by Leland Stanford to answer the question if a horse had all four legs in the air at any time at a full gallop. Although in 1878 he had already proved this with a single photograph the following year he devised a more elaborate setup with twenty-four cameras setup over a twenty foot length triggered by the horse’s hoofs as it galloped past. The resulting photographs were widely published (and later the basis for a book by Stanford) and a popular culture sensation.

A585ECBA-02D2-4601-87C1-990CD7B04A3D.jpg

Realizing that he was onto something, here Eadweard invented the Zoopraxiscope which projected images from a rotating glass disk to give the impression of motion – creating the first movie projector.

In 2008 Mitchell f Chan and Brad Hindson created A Dream of Pastures funded by Ontario Arts Council to be exhibited on the exterior of the Art Gallery of Ontario for Toronto’s Nuit Blanche All-Night contemporary art festival.


view 0,40,0″>


Mitchell says:

A Dream of Pastures is an interactive outdoor sculpture and animated light projection. On the exterior wall of the Art Gallery of Ontario, the ghostly form of a horse glows on the shadowy brick. On the ground several meters in front of it, a stationary bicycle beckons for investigation from the viewer.

As the viewer pedals the bicycle, he discovers that the phantom horse moves accordingly, animated by a mysterious system of projecting lights and turning gears. The viewer pedals more vigorously, the gears rotate more quickly, and the horse of light breaks into a gallop. Sitting in the saddle, the viewer creates a shadow that lines up with the horse, casting himself as a jockey in the projected world, galloping through the empty pastures of a fictitious world at an exhilarating pace.

It’s not clear to me if the connection is intentional or coincidence, but I’d like to think it’s a modern interactive interpretation of an important historical moment.

More information here

In 1878 Eadweard Muybridge was hired by Leland Stanford to answer the question if a horse had all four legs in the air at any time at a full gallop. Although he had already proved the point with a single photograph the following year he devised a more elaborate setup with twenty-four cameras setup over a twenty foot length triggered by the horse’s hoofs as it galloped past. The resulting photographs were widely published (and later the basis for a book by Stanford) and a sensation.

A585ECBA-02D2-4601-87C1-990CD7B04A3D.jpg

Realizing that he was onto something, cystitis Eadweard invented the Zoopraxiscope which projected images from a rotating glass disk to give the impression of motion – creating the first movie projector.

In 2008 Mitchell f Chan and Brad Hindson created A Dream of Pastures for the Ontario Arts Council.




A Dream of Pastures is an interactive outdoor sculpture and animated light projection. On the exterior wall of the Art Gallery of Ontario, pharm the ghostly form of a horse glows on the shadowy brick. On the ground several meters in front of it, a stationary bicycle beckons for investigation from the viewer.

As the viewer pedals the bicycle, he discovers that the phantom horse moves accordingly, animated by a mysterious system of projecting lights and turning gears. The viewer pedals more vigorously, the gears rotate more quickly, and the horse of light breaks into a gallop. Sitting in the saddle, the viewer creates a shadow that lines up with the horse, casting himself as a jockey in the projected world, galloping through the empty pastures of a fictitious world at an exhilarating pace.

In 1878 Eadweard Muybridge was hired by Leland Stanford to answer the question if a horse had all four legs in the air at any time at a full gallop. Although he had already proved the point with a single photograph the following year he devised a more elaborate setup with twenty-four cameras setup over a twenty foot length triggered by the horse’s hoofs as it galloped past. The resulting photographs were widely published (and later the basis for a book by Stanford) and a sensation.

A585ECBA-02D2-4601-87C1-990CD7B04A3D.jpg

Realizing that he was onto something, sick Eadweard invented the Zoopraxiscope which projected images from a rotating glass disk to give the impression of motion – creating the first movie projector.

In 2008 Mitchell f Chan and Brad Hindson created A Dream of Pastures for the Ontario Arts Council.




A Dream of Pastures is an interactive outdoor sculpture and animated light projection. On the exterior wall of the Art Gallery of Ontario, treatment the ghostly form of a horse glows on the shadowy brick. On the ground several meters in front of it, information pills a stationary bicycle beckons for investigation from the viewer.

As the viewer pedals the bicycle, he discovers that the phantom horse moves accordingly, animated by a mysterious system of projecting lights and turning gears. The viewer pedals more vigorously, the gears rotate more quickly, and the horse of light breaks into a gallop. Sitting in the saddle, the viewer creates a shadow that lines up with the horse, casting himself as a jockey in the projected world, galloping through the empty pastures of a fictitious world at an exhilarating pace.

Eadweard Muybridge was hired by Leland Stanford to answer the question if a horse had all four legs in the air at any time at a full gallop. In 1878 he had already proved this with a single photograph the following year he devised a more elaborate setup with twenty-four cameras setup over a twenty foot length triggered by the horse’s hoofs as it galloped past. The resulting photographs were widely published (and later the basis for a book by Stanford) and a popular culture sensation.

A585ECBA-02D2-4601-87C1-990CD7B04A3D.jpg

Realizing that he was onto something, eczema Eadweard invented the Zoopraxiscope which projected images from a rotating glass disk to give the impression of motion – creating the first movie projector.

In 2008 Mitchell f Chan and Brad Hindson created A Dream of Pastures funded by Ontario Arts Council to be exhibited on the exterior of the Art Gallery of Ontario for Toronto’s Nuit Blanche All-Night contemporary art festival.


mycoplasmosis 0,40,0″>


Mitchell says:

A Dream of Pastures is an interactive outdoor sculpture and animated light projection. On the exterior wall of the Art Gallery of Ontario, the ghostly form of a horse glows on the shadowy brick. On the ground several meters in front of it, a stationary bicycle beckons for investigation from the viewer.

As the viewer pedals the bicycle, he discovers that the phantom horse moves accordingly, animated by a mysterious system of projecting lights and turning gears. The viewer pedals more vigorously, the gears rotate more quickly, and the horse of light breaks into a gallop. Sitting in the saddle, the viewer creates a shadow that lines up with the horse, casting himself as a jockey in the projected world, galloping through the empty pastures of a fictitious world at an exhilarating pace.

It’s not clear to me if the connection is intentional or coincidence, but I’d like to think it’s a modern interactive interpretation of an important historical moment.

More information here

Eadweard Muybridge was hired by Leland Stanford to answer the question if a horse had all four legs in the air at any time at a full gallop. Although in 1878 he had already proved this with a single photograph the following year he devised a more elaborate setup with twenty-four cameras setup over a twenty foot length triggered by the horse’s hoofs as it galloped past. The resulting photographs were widely published (and later the basis for a book by Stanford) and a popular culture sensation.

A585ECBA-02D2-4601-87C1-990CD7B04A3D.jpg

Realizing that he was onto something, here Eadweard invented the Zoopraxiscope which projected images from a rotating glass disk to give the impression of motion – creating the first movie projector.

In 2008 Mitchell f Chan and Brad Hindson created A Dream of Pastures funded by Ontario Arts Council to be exhibited on the exterior of the Art Gallery of Ontario for Toronto’s Nuit Blanche All-Night contemporary art festival.


view 0,40,0″>


Mitchell says:

A Dream of Pastures is an interactive outdoor sculpture and animated light projection. On the exterior wall of the Art Gallery of Ontario, the ghostly form of a horse glows on the shadowy brick. On the ground several meters in front of it, a stationary bicycle beckons for investigation from the viewer.

As the viewer pedals the bicycle, he discovers that the phantom horse moves accordingly, animated by a mysterious system of projecting lights and turning gears. The viewer pedals more vigorously, the gears rotate more quickly, and the horse of light breaks into a gallop. Sitting in the saddle, the viewer creates a shadow that lines up with the horse, casting himself as a jockey in the projected world, galloping through the empty pastures of a fictitious world at an exhilarating pace.

It’s not clear to me if the connection is intentional or coincidence, but I’d like to think it’s a modern interactive interpretation of an important historical moment.

More information here

Eadweard Muybridge was hired by Leland Stanford to answer the question if a horse had all four legs in the air at any time at a full gallop. Although in 1878 he had already proved this with a single photograph the following year he devised a more elaborate setup with twenty-four cameras setup over a twenty foot length triggered by the horse’s hoofs as it galloped past. The resulting photographs were widely published (and later the basis for a book by Stanford) and a popular culture sensation.

A585ECBA-02D2-4601-87C1-990CD7B04A3D.jpg

Realizing that he was onto something, here Eadweard invented the Zoopraxiscope which projected images from a rotating glass disk to give the impression of motion – creating the first movie projector.

In 2008 Mitchell f Chan and Brad Hindson created A Dream of Pastures funded by Ontario Arts Council to be exhibited on the exterior of the Art Gallery of Ontario for Toronto’s Nuit Blanche All-Night contemporary art festival.


view 0,40,0″>


Mitchell says:

A Dream of Pastures is an interactive outdoor sculpture and animated light projection. On the exterior wall of the Art Gallery of Ontario, the ghostly form of a horse glows on the shadowy brick. On the ground several meters in front of it, a stationary bicycle beckons for investigation from the viewer.

As the viewer pedals the bicycle, he discovers that the phantom horse moves accordingly, animated by a mysterious system of projecting lights and turning gears. The viewer pedals more vigorously, the gears rotate more quickly, and the horse of light breaks into a gallop. Sitting in the saddle, the viewer creates a shadow that lines up with the horse, casting himself as a jockey in the projected world, galloping through the empty pastures of a fictitious world at an exhilarating pace.

It’s not clear to me if the connection is intentional or coincidence, but I’d like to think it’s a modern interactive interpretation of an important historical moment.

More information here

In 1878 Eadweard Muybridge was hired by Leland Stanford to answer the question if a horse had all four legs in the air at any time at a full gallop. Although he had already proved the point with a single photograph the following year he devised a more elaborate setup with twenty-four cameras setup over a twenty foot length triggered by the horse’s hoofs as it galloped past. The resulting photographs were widely published (and later the basis for a book by Stanford) and a sensation.

A585ECBA-02D2-4601-87C1-990CD7B04A3D.jpg

Realizing that he was onto something, cystitis Eadweard invented the Zoopraxiscope which projected images from a rotating glass disk to give the impression of motion – creating the first movie projector.

In 2008 Mitchell f Chan and Brad Hindson created A Dream of Pastures for the Ontario Arts Council.




A Dream of Pastures is an interactive outdoor sculpture and animated light projection. On the exterior wall of the Art Gallery of Ontario, pharm the ghostly form of a horse glows on the shadowy brick. On the ground several meters in front of it, a stationary bicycle beckons for investigation from the viewer.

As the viewer pedals the bicycle, he discovers that the phantom horse moves accordingly, animated by a mysterious system of projecting lights and turning gears. The viewer pedals more vigorously, the gears rotate more quickly, and the horse of light breaks into a gallop. Sitting in the saddle, the viewer creates a shadow that lines up with the horse, casting himself as a jockey in the projected world, galloping through the empty pastures of a fictitious world at an exhilarating pace.

Eadweard Muybridge was hired by Leland Stanford to answer the question if a horse had all four legs in the air at any time at a full gallop. Although in 1878 he had already proved this with a single photograph the following year he devised a more elaborate setup with twenty-four cameras setup over a twenty foot length triggered by the horse’s hoofs as it galloped past. The resulting photographs were widely published (and later the basis for a book by Stanford) and a popular culture sensation.

A585ECBA-02D2-4601-87C1-990CD7B04A3D.jpg

Realizing that he was onto something, here Eadweard invented the Zoopraxiscope which projected images from a rotating glass disk to give the impression of motion – creating the first movie projector.

In 2008 Mitchell f Chan and Brad Hindson created A Dream of Pastures funded by Ontario Arts Council to be exhibited on the exterior of the Art Gallery of Ontario for Toronto’s Nuit Blanche All-Night contemporary art festival.


view 0,40,0″>


Mitchell says:

A Dream of Pastures is an interactive outdoor sculpture and animated light projection. On the exterior wall of the Art Gallery of Ontario, the ghostly form of a horse glows on the shadowy brick. On the ground several meters in front of it, a stationary bicycle beckons for investigation from the viewer.

As the viewer pedals the bicycle, he discovers that the phantom horse moves accordingly, animated by a mysterious system of projecting lights and turning gears. The viewer pedals more vigorously, the gears rotate more quickly, and the horse of light breaks into a gallop. Sitting in the saddle, the viewer creates a shadow that lines up with the horse, casting himself as a jockey in the projected world, galloping through the empty pastures of a fictitious world at an exhilarating pace.

It’s not clear to me if the connection is intentional or coincidence, but I’d like to think it’s a modern interactive interpretation of an important historical moment.

More information here

In 1878 Eadweard Muybridge was hired by Leland Stanford to answer the question if a horse had all four legs in the air at any time at a full gallop. Although he had already proved the point with a single photograph the following year he devised a more elaborate setup with twenty-four cameras setup over a twenty foot length triggered by the horse’s hoofs as it galloped past. The resulting photographs were widely published (and later the basis for a book by Stanford) and a sensation.

A585ECBA-02D2-4601-87C1-990CD7B04A3D.jpg

Realizing that he was onto something, cystitis Eadweard invented the Zoopraxiscope which projected images from a rotating glass disk to give the impression of motion – creating the first movie projector.

In 2008 Mitchell f Chan and Brad Hindson created A Dream of Pastures for the Ontario Arts Council.




A Dream of Pastures is an interactive outdoor sculpture and animated light projection. On the exterior wall of the Art Gallery of Ontario, pharm the ghostly form of a horse glows on the shadowy brick. On the ground several meters in front of it, a stationary bicycle beckons for investigation from the viewer.

As the viewer pedals the bicycle, he discovers that the phantom horse moves accordingly, animated by a mysterious system of projecting lights and turning gears. The viewer pedals more vigorously, the gears rotate more quickly, and the horse of light breaks into a gallop. Sitting in the saddle, the viewer creates a shadow that lines up with the horse, casting himself as a jockey in the projected world, galloping through the empty pastures of a fictitious world at an exhilarating pace.

In 1878 Eadweard Muybridge was hired by Leland Stanford to answer the question if a horse had all four legs in the air at any time at a full gallop. Although he had already proved the point with a single photograph the following year he devised a more elaborate setup with twenty-four cameras setup over a twenty foot length triggered by the horse’s hoofs as it galloped past. The resulting photographs were widely published (and later the basis for a book by Stanford) and a sensation.

A585ECBA-02D2-4601-87C1-990CD7B04A3D.jpg

Realizing that he was onto something, sick Eadweard invented the Zoopraxiscope which projected images from a rotating glass disk to give the impression of motion – creating the first movie projector.

In 2008 Mitchell f Chan and Brad Hindson created A Dream of Pastures for the Ontario Arts Council.




A Dream of Pastures is an interactive outdoor sculpture and animated light projection. On the exterior wall of the Art Gallery of Ontario, treatment the ghostly form of a horse glows on the shadowy brick. On the ground several meters in front of it, information pills a stationary bicycle beckons for investigation from the viewer.

As the viewer pedals the bicycle, he discovers that the phantom horse moves accordingly, animated by a mysterious system of projecting lights and turning gears. The viewer pedals more vigorously, the gears rotate more quickly, and the horse of light breaks into a gallop. Sitting in the saddle, the viewer creates a shadow that lines up with the horse, casting himself as a jockey in the projected world, galloping through the empty pastures of a fictitious world at an exhilarating pace.

Eadweard Muybridge was hired by Leland Stanford to answer the question if a horse had all four legs in the air at any time at a full gallop. Although in 1878 he had already proved this with a single photograph the following year he devised a more elaborate setup with twenty-four cameras setup over a twenty foot length triggered by the horse’s hoofs as it galloped past. The resulting photographs were widely published (and later the basis for a book by Stanford) and a popular culture sensation.

A585ECBA-02D2-4601-87C1-990CD7B04A3D.jpg

Realizing that he was onto something, here Eadweard invented the Zoopraxiscope which projected images from a rotating glass disk to give the impression of motion – creating the first movie projector.

In 2008 Mitchell f Chan and Brad Hindson created A Dream of Pastures funded by Ontario Arts Council to be exhibited on the exterior of the Art Gallery of Ontario for Toronto’s Nuit Blanche All-Night contemporary art festival.


view 0,40,0″>


Mitchell says:

A Dream of Pastures is an interactive outdoor sculpture and animated light projection. On the exterior wall of the Art Gallery of Ontario, the ghostly form of a horse glows on the shadowy brick. On the ground several meters in front of it, a stationary bicycle beckons for investigation from the viewer.

As the viewer pedals the bicycle, he discovers that the phantom horse moves accordingly, animated by a mysterious system of projecting lights and turning gears. The viewer pedals more vigorously, the gears rotate more quickly, and the horse of light breaks into a gallop. Sitting in the saddle, the viewer creates a shadow that lines up with the horse, casting himself as a jockey in the projected world, galloping through the empty pastures of a fictitious world at an exhilarating pace.

It’s not clear to me if the connection is intentional or coincidence, but I’d like to think it’s a modern interactive interpretation of an important historical moment.

More information here

In 1878 Eadweard Muybridge was hired by Leland Stanford to answer the question if a horse had all four legs in the air at any time at a full gallop. Although he had already proved the point with a single photograph the following year he devised a more elaborate setup with twenty-four cameras setup over a twenty foot length triggered by the horse’s hoofs as it galloped past. The resulting photographs were widely published (and later the basis for a book by Stanford) and a sensation.

A585ECBA-02D2-4601-87C1-990CD7B04A3D.jpg

Realizing that he was onto something, cystitis Eadweard invented the Zoopraxiscope which projected images from a rotating glass disk to give the impression of motion – creating the first movie projector.

In 2008 Mitchell f Chan and Brad Hindson created A Dream of Pastures for the Ontario Arts Council.




A Dream of Pastures is an interactive outdoor sculpture and animated light projection. On the exterior wall of the Art Gallery of Ontario, pharm the ghostly form of a horse glows on the shadowy brick. On the ground several meters in front of it, a stationary bicycle beckons for investigation from the viewer.

As the viewer pedals the bicycle, he discovers that the phantom horse moves accordingly, animated by a mysterious system of projecting lights and turning gears. The viewer pedals more vigorously, the gears rotate more quickly, and the horse of light breaks into a gallop. Sitting in the saddle, the viewer creates a shadow that lines up with the horse, casting himself as a jockey in the projected world, galloping through the empty pastures of a fictitious world at an exhilarating pace.

In 1878 Eadweard Muybridge was hired by Leland Stanford to answer the question if a horse had all four legs in the air at any time at a full gallop. Although he had already proved the point with a single photograph the following year he devised a more elaborate setup with twenty-four cameras setup over a twenty foot length triggered by the horse’s hoofs as it galloped past. The resulting photographs were widely published (and later the basis for a book by Stanford) and a sensation.

A585ECBA-02D2-4601-87C1-990CD7B04A3D.jpg

Realizing that he was onto something, sick Eadweard invented the Zoopraxiscope which projected images from a rotating glass disk to give the impression of motion – creating the first movie projector.

In 2008 Mitchell f Chan and Brad Hindson created A Dream of Pastures for the Ontario Arts Council.




A Dream of Pastures is an interactive outdoor sculpture and animated light projection. On the exterior wall of the Art Gallery of Ontario, treatment the ghostly form of a horse glows on the shadowy brick. On the ground several meters in front of it, information pills a stationary bicycle beckons for investigation from the viewer.

As the viewer pedals the bicycle, he discovers that the phantom horse moves accordingly, animated by a mysterious system of projecting lights and turning gears. The viewer pedals more vigorously, the gears rotate more quickly, and the horse of light breaks into a gallop. Sitting in the saddle, the viewer creates a shadow that lines up with the horse, casting himself as a jockey in the projected world, galloping through the empty pastures of a fictitious world at an exhilarating pace.

Eadweard Muybridge was hired by Leland Stanford to answer the question if a horse had all four legs in the air at any time at a full gallop. In 1878 he had already proved this with a single photograph the following year he devised a more elaborate setup with twenty-four cameras setup over a twenty foot length triggered by the horse’s hoofs as it galloped past. The resulting photographs were widely published (and later the basis for a book by Stanford) and a popular culture sensation.

A585ECBA-02D2-4601-87C1-990CD7B04A3D.jpg

Realizing that he was onto something, eczema Eadweard invented the Zoopraxiscope which projected images from a rotating glass disk to give the impression of motion – creating the first movie projector.

In 2008 Mitchell f Chan and Brad Hindson created A Dream of Pastures funded by Ontario Arts Council to be exhibited on the exterior of the Art Gallery of Ontario for Toronto’s Nuit Blanche All-Night contemporary art festival.


mycoplasmosis 0,40,0″>


Mitchell says:

A Dream of Pastures is an interactive outdoor sculpture and animated light projection. On the exterior wall of the Art Gallery of Ontario, the ghostly form of a horse glows on the shadowy brick. On the ground several meters in front of it, a stationary bicycle beckons for investigation from the viewer.

As the viewer pedals the bicycle, he discovers that the phantom horse moves accordingly, animated by a mysterious system of projecting lights and turning gears. The viewer pedals more vigorously, the gears rotate more quickly, and the horse of light breaks into a gallop. Sitting in the saddle, the viewer creates a shadow that lines up with the horse, casting himself as a jockey in the projected world, galloping through the empty pastures of a fictitious world at an exhilarating pace.

It’s not clear to me if the connection is intentional or coincidence, but I’d like to think it’s a modern interactive interpretation of an important historical moment.

More information here

Eadweard Muybridge was hired by Leland Stanford to answer the question if a horse had all four legs in the air at any time at a full gallop. Although in 1878 he had already proved this with a single photograph the following year he devised a more elaborate setup with twenty-four cameras setup over a twenty foot length triggered by the horse’s hoofs as it galloped past. The resulting photographs were widely published (and later the basis for a book by Stanford) and a popular culture sensation.

A585ECBA-02D2-4601-87C1-990CD7B04A3D.jpg

Realizing that he was onto something, here Eadweard invented the Zoopraxiscope which projected images from a rotating glass disk to give the impression of motion – creating the first movie projector.

In 2008 Mitchell f Chan and Brad Hindson created A Dream of Pastures funded by Ontario Arts Council to be exhibited on the exterior of the Art Gallery of Ontario for Toronto’s Nuit Blanche All-Night contemporary art festival.


view 0,40,0″>


Mitchell says:

A Dream of Pastures is an interactive outdoor sculpture and animated light projection. On the exterior wall of the Art Gallery of Ontario, the ghostly form of a horse glows on the shadowy brick. On the ground several meters in front of it, a stationary bicycle beckons for investigation from the viewer.

As the viewer pedals the bicycle, he discovers that the phantom horse moves accordingly, animated by a mysterious system of projecting lights and turning gears. The viewer pedals more vigorously, the gears rotate more quickly, and the horse of light breaks into a gallop. Sitting in the saddle, the viewer creates a shadow that lines up with the horse, casting himself as a jockey in the projected world, galloping through the empty pastures of a fictitious world at an exhilarating pace.

It’s not clear to me if the connection is intentional or coincidence, but I’d like to think it’s a modern interactive interpretation of an important historical moment.

More information here

In 1878 Eadweard Muybridge was hired by Leland Stanford to answer the question if a horse had all four legs in the air at any time at a full gallop. Although he had already proved the point with a single photograph the following year he devised a more elaborate setup with twenty-four cameras setup over a twenty foot length triggered by the horse’s hoofs as it galloped past. The resulting photographs were widely published (and later the basis for a book by Stanford) and a sensation.

A585ECBA-02D2-4601-87C1-990CD7B04A3D.jpg

Realizing that he was onto something, cystitis Eadweard invented the Zoopraxiscope which projected images from a rotating glass disk to give the impression of motion – creating the first movie projector.

In 2008 Mitchell f Chan and Brad Hindson created A Dream of Pastures for the Ontario Arts Council.




A Dream of Pastures is an interactive outdoor sculpture and animated light projection. On the exterior wall of the Art Gallery of Ontario, pharm the ghostly form of a horse glows on the shadowy brick. On the ground several meters in front of it, a stationary bicycle beckons for investigation from the viewer.

As the viewer pedals the bicycle, he discovers that the phantom horse moves accordingly, animated by a mysterious system of projecting lights and turning gears. The viewer pedals more vigorously, the gears rotate more quickly, and the horse of light breaks into a gallop. Sitting in the saddle, the viewer creates a shadow that lines up with the horse, casting himself as a jockey in the projected world, galloping through the empty pastures of a fictitious world at an exhilarating pace.

In 1878 Eadweard Muybridge was hired by Leland Stanford to answer the question if a horse had all four legs in the air at any time at a full gallop. Although he had already proved the point with a single photograph the following year he devised a more elaborate setup with twenty-four cameras setup over a twenty foot length triggered by the horse’s hoofs as it galloped past. The resulting photographs were widely published (and later the basis for a book by Stanford) and a sensation.

A585ECBA-02D2-4601-87C1-990CD7B04A3D.jpg

Realizing that he was onto something, sick Eadweard invented the Zoopraxiscope which projected images from a rotating glass disk to give the impression of motion – creating the first movie projector.

In 2008 Mitchell f Chan and Brad Hindson created A Dream of Pastures for the Ontario Arts Council.




A Dream of Pastures is an interactive outdoor sculpture and animated light projection. On the exterior wall of the Art Gallery of Ontario, treatment the ghostly form of a horse glows on the shadowy brick. On the ground several meters in front of it, information pills a stationary bicycle beckons for investigation from the viewer.

As the viewer pedals the bicycle, he discovers that the phantom horse moves accordingly, animated by a mysterious system of projecting lights and turning gears. The viewer pedals more vigorously, the gears rotate more quickly, and the horse of light breaks into a gallop. Sitting in the saddle, the viewer creates a shadow that lines up with the horse, casting himself as a jockey in the projected world, galloping through the empty pastures of a fictitious world at an exhilarating pace.

Eadweard Muybridge was hired by Leland Stanford to answer the question if a horse had all four legs in the air at any time at a full gallop. In 1878 he had already proved this with a single photograph the following year he devised a more elaborate setup with twenty-four cameras setup over a twenty foot length triggered by the horse’s hoofs as it galloped past. The resulting photographs were widely published (and later the basis for a book by Stanford) and a popular culture sensation.

A585ECBA-02D2-4601-87C1-990CD7B04A3D.jpg

Realizing that he was onto something, eczema Eadweard invented the Zoopraxiscope which projected images from a rotating glass disk to give the impression of motion – creating the first movie projector.

In 2008 Mitchell f Chan and Brad Hindson created A Dream of Pastures funded by Ontario Arts Council to be exhibited on the exterior of the Art Gallery of Ontario for Toronto’s Nuit Blanche All-Night contemporary art festival.


mycoplasmosis 0,40,0″>


Mitchell says:

A Dream of Pastures is an interactive outdoor sculpture and animated light projection. On the exterior wall of the Art Gallery of Ontario, the ghostly form of a horse glows on the shadowy brick. On the ground several meters in front of it, a stationary bicycle beckons for investigation from the viewer.

As the viewer pedals the bicycle, he discovers that the phantom horse moves accordingly, animated by a mysterious system of projecting lights and turning gears. The viewer pedals more vigorously, the gears rotate more quickly, and the horse of light breaks into a gallop. Sitting in the saddle, the viewer creates a shadow that lines up with the horse, casting himself as a jockey in the projected world, galloping through the empty pastures of a fictitious world at an exhilarating pace.

It’s not clear to me if the connection is intentional or coincidence, but I’d like to think it’s a modern interactive interpretation of an important historical moment.

More information here

In 1878 Eadweard Muybridge was hired by Leland Stanford to answer the question if a horse had all four legs in the air at any time at a full gallop. Although he had already proved the point with a single photograph the following year he devised a more elaborate setup with twenty-four cameras setup over a twenty foot length triggered by the horse’s hoofs as it galloped past. The resulting photographs were widely published (and later the basis for a book by Stanford) and a sensation.

A585ECBA-02D2-4601-87C1-990CD7B04A3D.jpg

Realizing that he was onto something, check Eadweard invented the Zoopraxiscope which projected images from a rotating glass disk to give the impression of motion – creating the first movie projector.

In 2008 Mitchell f Chan and Brad Hindson created A Dream of Pastures for the Ontario Arts Council.

A Dream of Pastures is an interactive outdoor sculpture and animated light projection. On the exterior wall of the Art Gallery of Ontario, the ghostly form of a horse glows on the shadowy brick. On the ground several meters in front of it, a stationary bicycle beckons for investigation from the viewer.

As the viewer pedals the bicycle, he discovers that the phantom horse moves accordingly, animated by a mysterious system of projecting lights and turning gears. The viewer pedals more vigorously, the gears rotate more quickly, and the horse of light breaks into a gallop. Sitting in the saddle, the viewer creates a shadow that lines up with the horse, casting himself as a jockey in the projected world, galloping through the empty pastures of a fictitious world at an exhilarating pace.

Eadweard Muybridge was hired by Leland Stanford to answer the question if a horse had all four legs in the air at any time at a full gallop. Although in 1878 he had already proved this with a single photograph the following year he devised a more elaborate setup with twenty-four cameras setup over a twenty foot length triggered by the horse’s hoofs as it galloped past. The resulting photographs were widely published (and later the basis for a book by Stanford) and a popular culture sensation.

A585ECBA-02D2-4601-87C1-990CD7B04A3D.jpg

Realizing that he was onto something, here Eadweard invented the Zoopraxiscope which projected images from a rotating glass disk to give the impression of motion – creating the first movie projector.

In 2008 Mitchell f Chan and Brad Hindson created A Dream of Pastures funded by Ontario Arts Council to be exhibited on the exterior of the Art Gallery of Ontario for Toronto’s Nuit Blanche All-Night contemporary art festival.


view 0,40,0″>


Mitchell says:

A Dream of Pastures is an interactive outdoor sculpture and animated light projection. On the exterior wall of the Art Gallery of Ontario, the ghostly form of a horse glows on the shadowy brick. On the ground several meters in front of it, a stationary bicycle beckons for investigation from the viewer.

As the viewer pedals the bicycle, he discovers that the phantom horse moves accordingly, animated by a mysterious system of projecting lights and turning gears. The viewer pedals more vigorously, the gears rotate more quickly, and the horse of light breaks into a gallop. Sitting in the saddle, the viewer creates a shadow that lines up with the horse, casting himself as a jockey in the projected world, galloping through the empty pastures of a fictitious world at an exhilarating pace.

It’s not clear to me if the connection is intentional or coincidence, but I’d like to think it’s a modern interactive interpretation of an important historical moment.

More information here

Eadweard Muybridge was hired by Leland Stanford to answer the question if a horse had all four legs in the air at any time at a full gallop. Although in 1878 he had already proved this with a single photograph the following year he devised a more elaborate setup with twenty-four cameras setup over a twenty foot length triggered by the horse’s hoofs as it galloped past. The resulting photographs were widely published (and later the basis for a book by Stanford) and a popular culture sensation.

A585ECBA-02D2-4601-87C1-990CD7B04A3D.jpg

Realizing that he was onto something, here Eadweard invented the Zoopraxiscope which projected images from a rotating glass disk to give the impression of motion – creating the first movie projector.

In 2008 Mitchell f Chan and Brad Hindson created A Dream of Pastures funded by Ontario Arts Council to be exhibited on the exterior of the Art Gallery of Ontario for Toronto’s Nuit Blanche All-Night contemporary art festival.


view 0,40,0″>


Mitchell says:

A Dream of Pastures is an interactive outdoor sculpture and animated light projection. On the exterior wall of the Art Gallery of Ontario, the ghostly form of a horse glows on the shadowy brick. On the ground several meters in front of it, a stationary bicycle beckons for investigation from the viewer.

As the viewer pedals the bicycle, he discovers that the phantom horse moves accordingly, animated by a mysterious system of projecting lights and turning gears. The viewer pedals more vigorously, the gears rotate more quickly, and the horse of light breaks into a gallop. Sitting in the saddle, the viewer creates a shadow that lines up with the horse, casting himself as a jockey in the projected world, galloping through the empty pastures of a fictitious world at an exhilarating pace.

It’s not clear to me if the connection is intentional or coincidence, but I’d like to think it’s a modern interactive interpretation of an important historical moment.

More information here

In 1878 Eadweard Muybridge was hired by Leland Stanford to answer the question if a horse had all four legs in the air at any time at a full gallop. Although he had already proved the point with a single photograph the following year he devised a more elaborate setup with twenty-four cameras setup over a twenty foot length triggered by the horse’s hoofs as it galloped past. The resulting photographs were widely published (and later the basis for a book by Stanford) and a sensation.

A585ECBA-02D2-4601-87C1-990CD7B04A3D.jpg

Realizing that he was onto something, cystitis Eadweard invented the Zoopraxiscope which projected images from a rotating glass disk to give the impression of motion – creating the first movie projector.

In 2008 Mitchell f Chan and Brad Hindson created A Dream of Pastures for the Ontario Arts Council.




A Dream of Pastures is an interactive outdoor sculpture and animated light projection. On the exterior wall of the Art Gallery of Ontario, pharm the ghostly form of a horse glows on the shadowy brick. On the ground several meters in front of it, a stationary bicycle beckons for investigation from the viewer.

As the viewer pedals the bicycle, he discovers that the phantom horse moves accordingly, animated by a mysterious system of projecting lights and turning gears. The viewer pedals more vigorously, the gears rotate more quickly, and the horse of light breaks into a gallop. Sitting in the saddle, the viewer creates a shadow that lines up with the horse, casting himself as a jockey in the projected world, galloping through the empty pastures of a fictitious world at an exhilarating pace.

Eadweard Muybridge was hired by Leland Stanford to answer the question if a horse had all four legs in the air at any time at a full gallop. Although in 1878 he had already proved this with a single photograph the following year he devised a more elaborate setup with twenty-four cameras setup over a twenty foot length triggered by the horse’s hoofs as it galloped past. The resulting photographs were widely published (and later the basis for a book by Stanford) and a popular culture sensation.

A585ECBA-02D2-4601-87C1-990CD7B04A3D.jpg

Realizing that he was onto something, here Eadweard invented the Zoopraxiscope which projected images from a rotating glass disk to give the impression of motion – creating the first movie projector.

In 2008 Mitchell f Chan and Brad Hindson created A Dream of Pastures funded by Ontario Arts Council to be exhibited on the exterior of the Art Gallery of Ontario for Toronto’s Nuit Blanche All-Night contemporary art festival.


view 0,40,0″>


Mitchell says:

A Dream of Pastures is an interactive outdoor sculpture and animated light projection. On the exterior wall of the Art Gallery of Ontario, the ghostly form of a horse glows on the shadowy brick. On the ground several meters in front of it, a stationary bicycle beckons for investigation from the viewer.

As the viewer pedals the bicycle, he discovers that the phantom horse moves accordingly, animated by a mysterious system of projecting lights and turning gears. The viewer pedals more vigorously, the gears rotate more quickly, and the horse of light breaks into a gallop. Sitting in the saddle, the viewer creates a shadow that lines up with the horse, casting himself as a jockey in the projected world, galloping through the empty pastures of a fictitious world at an exhilarating pace.

It’s not clear to me if the connection is intentional or coincidence, but I’d like to think it’s a modern interactive interpretation of an important historical moment.

More information here

In 1878 Eadweard Muybridge was hired by Leland Stanford to answer the question if a horse had all four legs in the air at any time at a full gallop. Although he had already proved the point with a single photograph the following year he devised a more elaborate setup with twenty-four cameras setup over a twenty foot length triggered by the horse’s hoofs as it galloped past. The resulting photographs were widely published (and later the basis for a book by Stanford) and a sensation.

A585ECBA-02D2-4601-87C1-990CD7B04A3D.jpg

Realizing that he was onto something, cystitis Eadweard invented the Zoopraxiscope which projected images from a rotating glass disk to give the impression of motion – creating the first movie projector.

In 2008 Mitchell f Chan and Brad Hindson created A Dream of Pastures for the Ontario Arts Council.




A Dream of Pastures is an interactive outdoor sculpture and animated light projection. On the exterior wall of the Art Gallery of Ontario, pharm the ghostly form of a horse glows on the shadowy brick. On the ground several meters in front of it, a stationary bicycle beckons for investigation from the viewer.

As the viewer pedals the bicycle, he discovers that the phantom horse moves accordingly, animated by a mysterious system of projecting lights and turning gears. The viewer pedals more vigorously, the gears rotate more quickly, and the horse of light breaks into a gallop. Sitting in the saddle, the viewer creates a shadow that lines up with the horse, casting himself as a jockey in the projected world, galloping through the empty pastures of a fictitious world at an exhilarating pace.

In 1878 Eadweard Muybridge was hired by Leland Stanford to answer the question if a horse had all four legs in the air at any time at a full gallop. Although he had already proved the point with a single photograph the following year he devised a more elaborate setup with twenty-four cameras setup over a twenty foot length triggered by the horse’s hoofs as it galloped past. The resulting photographs were widely published (and later the basis for a book by Stanford) and a sensation.

A585ECBA-02D2-4601-87C1-990CD7B04A3D.jpg

Realizing that he was onto something, sick Eadweard invented the Zoopraxiscope which projected images from a rotating glass disk to give the impression of motion – creating the first movie projector.

In 2008 Mitchell f Chan and Brad Hindson created A Dream of Pastures for the Ontario Arts Council.




A Dream of Pastures is an interactive outdoor sculpture and animated light projection. On the exterior wall of the Art Gallery of Ontario, treatment the ghostly form of a horse glows on the shadowy brick. On the ground several meters in front of it, information pills a stationary bicycle beckons for investigation from the viewer.

As the viewer pedals the bicycle, he discovers that the phantom horse moves accordingly, animated by a mysterious system of projecting lights and turning gears. The viewer pedals more vigorously, the gears rotate more quickly, and the horse of light breaks into a gallop. Sitting in the saddle, the viewer creates a shadow that lines up with the horse, casting himself as a jockey in the projected world, galloping through the empty pastures of a fictitious world at an exhilarating pace.

Eadweard Muybridge was hired by Leland Stanford to answer the question if a horse had all four legs in the air at any time at a full gallop. Although in 1878 he had already proved this with a single photograph the following year he devised a more elaborate setup with twenty-four cameras setup over a twenty foot length triggered by the horse’s hoofs as it galloped past. The resulting photographs were widely published (and later the basis for a book by Stanford) and a popular culture sensation.

A585ECBA-02D2-4601-87C1-990CD7B04A3D.jpg

Realizing that he was onto something, here Eadweard invented the Zoopraxiscope which projected images from a rotating glass disk to give the impression of motion – creating the first movie projector.

In 2008 Mitchell f Chan and Brad Hindson created A Dream of Pastures funded by Ontario Arts Council to be exhibited on the exterior of the Art Gallery of Ontario for Toronto’s Nuit Blanche All-Night contemporary art festival.


view 0,40,0″>


Mitchell says:

A Dream of Pastures is an interactive outdoor sculpture and animated light projection. On the exterior wall of the Art Gallery of Ontario, the ghostly form of a horse glows on the shadowy brick. On the ground several meters in front of it, a stationary bicycle beckons for investigation from the viewer.

As the viewer pedals the bicycle, he discovers that the phantom horse moves accordingly, animated by a mysterious system of projecting lights and turning gears. The viewer pedals more vigorously, the gears rotate more quickly, and the horse of light breaks into a gallop. Sitting in the saddle, the viewer creates a shadow that lines up with the horse, casting himself as a jockey in the projected world, galloping through the empty pastures of a fictitious world at an exhilarating pace.

It’s not clear to me if the connection is intentional or coincidence, but I’d like to think it’s a modern interactive interpretation of an important historical moment.

More information here

In 1878 Eadweard Muybridge was hired by Leland Stanford to answer the question if a horse had all four legs in the air at any time at a full gallop. Although he had already proved the point with a single photograph the following year he devised a more elaborate setup with twenty-four cameras setup over a twenty foot length triggered by the horse’s hoofs as it galloped past. The resulting photographs were widely published (and later the basis for a book by Stanford) and a sensation.

A585ECBA-02D2-4601-87C1-990CD7B04A3D.jpg

Realizing that he was onto something, cystitis Eadweard invented the Zoopraxiscope which projected images from a rotating glass disk to give the impression of motion – creating the first movie projector.

In 2008 Mitchell f Chan and Brad Hindson created A Dream of Pastures for the Ontario Arts Council.




A Dream of Pastures is an interactive outdoor sculpture and animated light projection. On the exterior wall of the Art Gallery of Ontario, pharm the ghostly form of a horse glows on the shadowy brick. On the ground several meters in front of it, a stationary bicycle beckons for investigation from the viewer.

As the viewer pedals the bicycle, he discovers that the phantom horse moves accordingly, animated by a mysterious system of projecting lights and turning gears. The viewer pedals more vigorously, the gears rotate more quickly, and the horse of light breaks into a gallop. Sitting in the saddle, the viewer creates a shadow that lines up with the horse, casting himself as a jockey in the projected world, galloping through the empty pastures of a fictitious world at an exhilarating pace.

In 1878 Eadweard Muybridge was hired by Leland Stanford to answer the question if a horse had all four legs in the air at any time at a full gallop. Although he had already proved the point with a single photograph the following year he devised a more elaborate setup with twenty-four cameras setup over a twenty foot length triggered by the horse’s hoofs as it galloped past. The resulting photographs were widely published (and later the basis for a book by Stanford) and a sensation.

A585ECBA-02D2-4601-87C1-990CD7B04A3D.jpg

Realizing that he was onto something, sick Eadweard invented the Zoopraxiscope which projected images from a rotating glass disk to give the impression of motion – creating the first movie projector.

In 2008 Mitchell f Chan and Brad Hindson created A Dream of Pastures for the Ontario Arts Council.




A Dream of Pastures is an interactive outdoor sculpture and animated light projection. On the exterior wall of the Art Gallery of Ontario, treatment the ghostly form of a horse glows on the shadowy brick. On the ground several meters in front of it, information pills a stationary bicycle beckons for investigation from the viewer.

As the viewer pedals the bicycle, he discovers that the phantom horse moves accordingly, animated by a mysterious system of projecting lights and turning gears. The viewer pedals more vigorously, the gears rotate more quickly, and the horse of light breaks into a gallop. Sitting in the saddle, the viewer creates a shadow that lines up with the horse, casting himself as a jockey in the projected world, galloping through the empty pastures of a fictitious world at an exhilarating pace.

Eadweard Muybridge was hired by Leland Stanford to answer the question if a horse had all four legs in the air at any time at a full gallop. In 1878 he had already proved this with a single photograph the following year he devised a more elaborate setup with twenty-four cameras setup over a twenty foot length triggered by the horse’s hoofs as it galloped past. The resulting photographs were widely published (and later the basis for a book by Stanford) and a popular culture sensation.

A585ECBA-02D2-4601-87C1-990CD7B04A3D.jpg

Realizing that he was onto something, eczema Eadweard invented the Zoopraxiscope which projected images from a rotating glass disk to give the impression of motion – creating the first movie projector.

In 2008 Mitchell f Chan and Brad Hindson created A Dream of Pastures funded by Ontario Arts Council to be exhibited on the exterior of the Art Gallery of Ontario for Toronto’s Nuit Blanche All-Night contemporary art festival.


mycoplasmosis 0,40,0″>


Mitchell says:

A Dream of Pastures is an interactive outdoor sculpture and animated light projection. On the exterior wall of the Art Gallery of Ontario, the ghostly form of a horse glows on the shadowy brick. On the ground several meters in front of it, a stationary bicycle beckons for investigation from the viewer.

As the viewer pedals the bicycle, he discovers that the phantom horse moves accordingly, animated by a mysterious system of projecting lights and turning gears. The viewer pedals more vigorously, the gears rotate more quickly, and the horse of light breaks into a gallop. Sitting in the saddle, the viewer creates a shadow that lines up with the horse, casting himself as a jockey in the projected world, galloping through the empty pastures of a fictitious world at an exhilarating pace.

It’s not clear to me if the connection is intentional or coincidence, but I’d like to think it’s a modern interactive interpretation of an important historical moment.

More information here

Eadweard Muybridge was hired by Leland Stanford to answer the question if a horse had all four legs in the air at any time at a full gallop. Although in 1878 he had already proved this with a single photograph the following year he devised a more elaborate setup with twenty-four cameras setup over a twenty foot length triggered by the horse’s hoofs as it galloped past. The resulting photographs were widely published (and later the basis for a book by Stanford) and a popular culture sensation.

A585ECBA-02D2-4601-87C1-990CD7B04A3D.jpg

Realizing that he was onto something, here Eadweard invented the Zoopraxiscope which projected images from a rotating glass disk to give the impression of motion – creating the first movie projector.

In 2008 Mitchell f Chan and Brad Hindson created A Dream of Pastures funded by Ontario Arts Council to be exhibited on the exterior of the Art Gallery of Ontario for Toronto’s Nuit Blanche All-Night contemporary art festival.


view 0,40,0″>


Mitchell says:

A Dream of Pastures is an interactive outdoor sculpture and animated light projection. On the exterior wall of the Art Gallery of Ontario, the ghostly form of a horse glows on the shadowy brick. On the ground several meters in front of it, a stationary bicycle beckons for investigation from the viewer.

As the viewer pedals the bicycle, he discovers that the phantom horse moves accordingly, animated by a mysterious system of projecting lights and turning gears. The viewer pedals more vigorously, the gears rotate more quickly, and the horse of light breaks into a gallop. Sitting in the saddle, the viewer creates a shadow that lines up with the horse, casting himself as a jockey in the projected world, galloping through the empty pastures of a fictitious world at an exhilarating pace.

It’s not clear to me if the connection is intentional or coincidence, but I’d like to think it’s a modern interactive interpretation of an important historical moment.

More information here

In 1878 Eadweard Muybridge was hired by Leland Stanford to answer the question if a horse had all four legs in the air at any time at a full gallop. Although he had already proved the point with a single photograph the following year he devised a more elaborate setup with twenty-four cameras setup over a twenty foot length triggered by the horse’s hoofs as it galloped past. The resulting photographs were widely published (and later the basis for a book by Stanford) and a sensation.

A585ECBA-02D2-4601-87C1-990CD7B04A3D.jpg

Realizing that he was onto something, cystitis Eadweard invented the Zoopraxiscope which projected images from a rotating glass disk to give the impression of motion – creating the first movie projector.

In 2008 Mitchell f Chan and Brad Hindson created A Dream of Pastures for the Ontario Arts Council.




A Dream of Pastures is an interactive outdoor sculpture and animated light projection. On the exterior wall of the Art Gallery of Ontario, pharm the ghostly form of a horse glows on the shadowy brick. On the ground several meters in front of it, a stationary bicycle beckons for investigation from the viewer.

As the viewer pedals the bicycle, he discovers that the phantom horse moves accordingly, animated by a mysterious system of projecting lights and turning gears. The viewer pedals more vigorously, the gears rotate more quickly, and the horse of light breaks into a gallop. Sitting in the saddle, the viewer creates a shadow that lines up with the horse, casting himself as a jockey in the projected world, galloping through the empty pastures of a fictitious world at an exhilarating pace.

In 1878 Eadweard Muybridge was hired by Leland Stanford to answer the question if a horse had all four legs in the air at any time at a full gallop. Although he had already proved the point with a single photograph the following year he devised a more elaborate setup with twenty-four cameras setup over a twenty foot length triggered by the horse’s hoofs as it galloped past. The resulting photographs were widely published (and later the basis for a book by Stanford) and a sensation.

A585ECBA-02D2-4601-87C1-990CD7B04A3D.jpg

Realizing that he was onto something, sick Eadweard invented the Zoopraxiscope which projected images from a rotating glass disk to give the impression of motion – creating the first movie projector.

In 2008 Mitchell f Chan and Brad Hindson created A Dream of Pastures for the Ontario Arts Council.




A Dream of Pastures is an interactive outdoor sculpture and animated light projection. On the exterior wall of the Art Gallery of Ontario, treatment the ghostly form of a horse glows on the shadowy brick. On the ground several meters in front of it, information pills a stationary bicycle beckons for investigation from the viewer.

As the viewer pedals the bicycle, he discovers that the phantom horse moves accordingly, animated by a mysterious system of projecting lights and turning gears. The viewer pedals more vigorously, the gears rotate more quickly, and the horse of light breaks into a gallop. Sitting in the saddle, the viewer creates a shadow that lines up with the horse, casting himself as a jockey in the projected world, galloping through the empty pastures of a fictitious world at an exhilarating pace.

Eadweard Muybridge was hired by Leland Stanford to answer the question if a horse had all four legs in the air at any time at a full gallop. In 1878 he had already proved this with a single photograph the following year he devised a more elaborate setup with twenty-four cameras setup over a twenty foot length triggered by the horse’s hoofs as it galloped past. The resulting photographs were widely published (and later the basis for a book by Stanford) and a popular culture sensation.

A585ECBA-02D2-4601-87C1-990CD7B04A3D.jpg

Realizing that he was onto something, eczema Eadweard invented the Zoopraxiscope which projected images from a rotating glass disk to give the impression of motion – creating the first movie projector.

In 2008 Mitchell f Chan and Brad Hindson created A Dream of Pastures funded by Ontario Arts Council to be exhibited on the exterior of the Art Gallery of Ontario for Toronto’s Nuit Blanche All-Night contemporary art festival.


mycoplasmosis 0,40,0″>


Mitchell says:

A Dream of Pastures is an interactive outdoor sculpture and animated light projection. On the exterior wall of the Art Gallery of Ontario, the ghostly form of a horse glows on the shadowy brick. On the ground several meters in front of it, a stationary bicycle beckons for investigation from the viewer.

As the viewer pedals the bicycle, he discovers that the phantom horse moves accordingly, animated by a mysterious system of projecting lights and turning gears. The viewer pedals more vigorously, the gears rotate more quickly, and the horse of light breaks into a gallop. Sitting in the saddle, the viewer creates a shadow that lines up with the horse, casting himself as a jockey in the projected world, galloping through the empty pastures of a fictitious world at an exhilarating pace.

It’s not clear to me if the connection is intentional or coincidence, but I’d like to think it’s a modern interactive interpretation of an important historical moment.

More information here

In 1878 Eadweard Muybridge was hired by Leland Stanford to answer the question if a horse had all four legs in the air at any time at a full gallop. Although he had already proved the point with a single photograph the following year he devised a more elaborate setup with twenty-four cameras setup over a twenty foot length triggered by the horse’s hoofs as it galloped past. The resulting photographs were widely published (and later the basis for a book by Stanford) and a sensation.

A585ECBA-02D2-4601-87C1-990CD7B04A3D.jpg

Realizing that he was onto something, check Eadweard invented the Zoopraxiscope which projected images from a rotating glass disk to give the impression of motion – creating the first movie projector.

In 2008 Mitchell f Chan and Brad Hindson created A Dream of Pastures for the Ontario Arts Council.

A Dream of Pastures is an interactive outdoor sculpture and animated light projection. On the exterior wall of the Art Gallery of Ontario, the ghostly form of a horse glows on the shadowy brick. On the ground several meters in front of it, a stationary bicycle beckons for investigation from the viewer.

As the viewer pedals the bicycle, he discovers that the phantom horse moves accordingly, animated by a mysterious system of projecting lights and turning gears. The viewer pedals more vigorously, the gears rotate more quickly, and the horse of light breaks into a gallop. Sitting in the saddle, the viewer creates a shadow that lines up with the horse, casting himself as a jockey in the projected world, galloping through the empty pastures of a fictitious world at an exhilarating pace.

Eadweard Muybridge was hired by Leland Stanford to answer the question if a horse had all four legs in the air at any time at a full gallop. Although in 1878 he had already proved this with a single photograph the following year he devised a more elaborate setup with twenty-four cameras setup over a twenty foot length triggered by the horse’s hoofs as it galloped past. The resulting photographs were widely published (and later the basis for a book by Stanford) and a popular culture sensation.

A585ECBA-02D2-4601-87C1-990CD7B04A3D.jpg

Realizing that he was onto something, here Eadweard invented the Zoopraxiscope which projected images from a rotating glass disk to give the impression of motion – creating the first movie projector.

In 2008 Mitchell f Chan and Brad Hindson created A Dream of Pastures funded by Ontario Arts Council to be exhibited on the exterior of the Art Gallery of Ontario for Toronto’s Nuit Blanche All-Night contemporary art festival.


view 0,40,0″>


Mitchell says:

A Dream of Pastures is an interactive outdoor sculpture and animated light projection. On the exterior wall of the Art Gallery of Ontario, the ghostly form of a horse glows on the shadowy brick. On the ground several meters in front of it, a stationary bicycle beckons for investigation from the viewer.

As the viewer pedals the bicycle, he discovers that the phantom horse moves accordingly, animated by a mysterious system of projecting lights and turning gears. The viewer pedals more vigorously, the gears rotate more quickly, and the horse of light breaks into a gallop. Sitting in the saddle, the viewer creates a shadow that lines up with the horse, casting himself as a jockey in the projected world, galloping through the empty pastures of a fictitious world at an exhilarating pace.

It’s not clear to me if the connection is intentional or coincidence, but I’d like to think it’s a modern interactive interpretation of an important historical moment.

More information here

In 1878 Eadweard Muybridge was hired by Leland Stanford to answer the question if a horse had all four legs in the air at any time at a full gallop. Although he had already proved the point with a single photograph the following year he devised a more elaborate setup with twenty-four cameras setup over a twenty foot length triggered by the horse’s hoofs as it galloped past. The resulting photographs were widely published (and later the basis for a book by Stanford) and a sensation.

A585ECBA-02D2-4601-87C1-990CD7B04A3D.jpg

Realizing that he was onto something, cystitis Eadweard invented the Zoopraxiscope which projected images from a rotating glass disk to give the impression of motion – creating the first movie projector.

In 2008 Mitchell f Chan and Brad Hindson created A Dream of Pastures for the Ontario Arts Council.




A Dream of Pastures is an interactive outdoor sculpture and animated light projection. On the exterior wall of the Art Gallery of Ontario, pharm the ghostly form of a horse glows on the shadowy brick. On the ground several meters in front of it, a stationary bicycle beckons for investigation from the viewer.

As the viewer pedals the bicycle, he discovers that the phantom horse moves accordingly, animated by a mysterious system of projecting lights and turning gears. The viewer pedals more vigorously, the gears rotate more quickly, and the horse of light breaks into a gallop. Sitting in the saddle, the viewer creates a shadow that lines up with the horse, casting himself as a jockey in the projected world, galloping through the empty pastures of a fictitious world at an exhilarating pace.

In 1878 Eadweard Muybridge was hired by Leland Stanford to answer the question if a horse had all four legs in the air at any time at a full gallop. Although he had already proved the point with a single photograph the following year he devised a more elaborate setup with twenty-four cameras setup over a twenty foot length triggered by the horse’s hoofs as it galloped past. The resulting photographs were widely published (and later the basis for a book by Stanford) and a sensation.

A585ECBA-02D2-4601-87C1-990CD7B04A3D.jpg

Realizing that he was onto something, sick Eadweard invented the Zoopraxiscope which projected images from a rotating glass disk to give the impression of motion – creating the first movie projector.

In 2008 Mitchell f Chan and Brad Hindson created A Dream of Pastures for the Ontario Arts Council.




A Dream of Pastures is an interactive outdoor sculpture and animated light projection. On the exterior wall of the Art Gallery of Ontario, treatment the ghostly form of a horse glows on the shadowy brick. On the ground several meters in front of it, information pills a stationary bicycle beckons for investigation from the viewer.

As the viewer pedals the bicycle, he discovers that the phantom horse moves accordingly, animated by a mysterious system of projecting lights and turning gears. The viewer pedals more vigorously, the gears rotate more quickly, and the horse of light breaks into a gallop. Sitting in the saddle, the viewer creates a shadow that lines up with the horse, casting himself as a jockey in the projected world, galloping through the empty pastures of a fictitious world at an exhilarating pace.

Eadweard Muybridge was hired by Leland Stanford to answer the question if a horse had all four legs in the air at any time at a full gallop. In 1878 he had already proved this with a single photograph the following year he devised a more elaborate setup with twenty-four cameras setup over a twenty foot length triggered by the horse’s hoofs as it galloped past. The resulting photographs were widely published (and later the basis for a book by Stanford) and a popular culture sensation.

A585ECBA-02D2-4601-87C1-990CD7B04A3D.jpg

Realizing that he was onto something, eczema Eadweard invented the Zoopraxiscope which projected images from a rotating glass disk to give the impression of motion – creating the first movie projector.

In 2008 Mitchell f Chan and Brad Hindson created A Dream of Pastures funded by Ontario Arts Council to be exhibited on the exterior of the Art Gallery of Ontario for Toronto’s Nuit Blanche All-Night contemporary art festival.


mycoplasmosis 0,40,0″>


Mitchell says:

A Dream of Pastures is an interactive outdoor sculpture and animated light projection. On the exterior wall of the Art Gallery of Ontario, the ghostly form of a horse glows on the shadowy brick. On the ground several meters in front of it, a stationary bicycle beckons for investigation from the viewer.

As the viewer pedals the bicycle, he discovers that the phantom horse moves accordingly, animated by a mysterious system of projecting lights and turning gears. The viewer pedals more vigorously, the gears rotate more quickly, and the horse of light breaks into a gallop. Sitting in the saddle, the viewer creates a shadow that lines up with the horse, casting himself as a jockey in the projected world, galloping through the empty pastures of a fictitious world at an exhilarating pace.

It’s not clear to me if the connection is intentional or coincidence, but I’d like to think it’s a modern interactive interpretation of an important historical moment.

More information here

In 1878 Eadweard Muybridge was hired by Leland Stanford to answer the question if a horse had all four legs in the air at any time at a full gallop. Although he had already proved the point with a single photograph the following year he devised a more elaborate setup with twenty-four cameras setup over a twenty foot length triggered by the horse’s hoofs as it galloped past. The resulting photographs were widely published (and later the basis for a book by Stanford) and a sensation.

A585ECBA-02D2-4601-87C1-990CD7B04A3D.jpg

Realizing that he was onto something, check Eadweard invented the Zoopraxiscope which projected images from a rotating glass disk to give the impression of motion – creating the first movie projector.

In 2008 Mitchell f Chan and Brad Hindson created A Dream of Pastures for the Ontario Arts Council.

A Dream of Pastures is an interactive outdoor sculpture and animated light projection. On the exterior wall of the Art Gallery of Ontario, the ghostly form of a horse glows on the shadowy brick. On the ground several meters in front of it, a stationary bicycle beckons for investigation from the viewer.

As the viewer pedals the bicycle, he discovers that the phantom horse moves accordingly, animated by a mysterious system of projecting lights and turning gears. The viewer pedals more vigorously, the gears rotate more quickly, and the horse of light breaks into a gallop. Sitting in the saddle, the viewer creates a shadow that lines up with the horse, casting himself as a jockey in the projected world, galloping through the empty pastures of a fictitious world at an exhilarating pace.

In 1878 Eadweard Muybridge was hired by Leland Stanford to answer the question if a horse had all four legs in the air at any time at a full gallop. Although he had already proved the point with a single photograph the following year he devised a more elaborate setup with twenty-four cameras setup over a twenty foot length triggered by the horse’s hoofs as it galloped past. The resulting photographs were widely published (and later the basis for a book by Stanford) and a sensation.

A585ECBA-02D2-4601-87C1-990CD7B04A3D.jpg

Realizing that he was onto something, cystitis Eadweard invented the Zoopraxiscope which projected images from a rotating glass disk to give the impression of motion – creating the first movie projector.

In 2008 Mitchell f Chan and Brad Hindson created A Dream of Pastures for the Ontario Arts Council.


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A Dream of Pastures is an interactive outdoor sculpture and animated light projection. On the exterior wall of the Art Gallery of Ontario, the ghostly form of a horse glows on the shadowy brick. On the ground several meters in front of it, a stationary bicycle beckons for investigation from the viewer.

As the viewer pedals the bicycle, he discovers that the phantom horse moves accordingly, animated by a mysterious system of projecting lights and turning gears. The viewer pedals more vigorously, the gears rotate more quickly, and the horse of light breaks into a gallop. Sitting in the saddle, the viewer creates a shadow that lines up with the horse, casting himself as a jockey in the projected world, galloping through the empty pastures of a fictitious world at an exhilarating pace.

Eadweard Muybridge was hired by Leland Stanford to answer the question if a horse had all four legs in the air at any time at a full gallop. Although in 1878 he had already proved this with a single photograph the following year he devised a more elaborate setup with twenty-four cameras setup over a twenty foot length triggered by the horse’s hoofs as it galloped past. The resulting photographs were widely published (and later the basis for a book by Stanford) and a popular culture sensation.

A585ECBA-02D2-4601-87C1-990CD7B04A3D.jpg

Realizing that he was onto something, here Eadweard invented the Zoopraxiscope which projected images from a rotating glass disk to give the impression of motion – creating the first movie projector.

In 2008 Mitchell f Chan and Brad Hindson created A Dream of Pastures funded by Ontario Arts Council to be exhibited on the exterior of the Art Gallery of Ontario for Toronto’s Nuit Blanche All-Night contemporary art festival.


view 0,40,0″>


Mitchell says:

A Dream of Pastures is an interactive outdoor sculpture and animated light projection. On the exterior wall of the Art Gallery of Ontario, the ghostly form of a horse glows on the shadowy brick. On the ground several meters in front of it, a stationary bicycle beckons for investigation from the viewer.

As the viewer pedals the bicycle, he discovers that the phantom horse moves accordingly, animated by a mysterious system of projecting lights and turning gears. The viewer pedals more vigorously, the gears rotate more quickly, and the horse of light breaks into a gallop. Sitting in the saddle, the viewer creates a shadow that lines up with the horse, casting himself as a jockey in the projected world, galloping through the empty pastures of a fictitious world at an exhilarating pace.

It’s not clear to me if the connection is intentional or coincidence, but I’d like to think it’s a modern interactive interpretation of an important historical moment.

More information here

Eadweard Muybridge was hired by Leland Stanford to answer the question if a horse had all four legs in the air at any time at a full gallop. Although in 1878 he had already proved this with a single photograph the following year he devised a more elaborate setup with twenty-four cameras setup over a twenty foot length triggered by the horse’s hoofs as it galloped past. The resulting photographs were widely published (and later the basis for a book by Stanford) and a popular culture sensation.

A585ECBA-02D2-4601-87C1-990CD7B04A3D.jpg

Realizing that he was onto something, here Eadweard invented the Zoopraxiscope which projected images from a rotating glass disk to give the impression of motion – creating the first movie projector.

In 2008 Mitchell f Chan and Brad Hindson created A Dream of Pastures funded by Ontario Arts Council to be exhibited on the exterior of the Art Gallery of Ontario for Toronto’s Nuit Blanche All-Night contemporary art festival.


view 0,40,0″>


Mitchell says:

A Dream of Pastures is an interactive outdoor sculpture and animated light projection. On the exterior wall of the Art Gallery of Ontario, the ghostly form of a horse glows on the shadowy brick. On the ground several meters in front of it, a stationary bicycle beckons for investigation from the viewer.

As the viewer pedals the bicycle, he discovers that the phantom horse moves accordingly, animated by a mysterious system of projecting lights and turning gears. The viewer pedals more vigorously, the gears rotate more quickly, and the horse of light breaks into a gallop. Sitting in the saddle, the viewer creates a shadow that lines up with the horse, casting himself as a jockey in the projected world, galloping through the empty pastures of a fictitious world at an exhilarating pace.

It’s not clear to me if the connection is intentional or coincidence, but I’d like to think it’s a modern interactive interpretation of an important historical moment.

More information here

In 1878 Eadweard Muybridge was hired by Leland Stanford to answer the question if a horse had all four legs in the air at any time at a full gallop. Although he had already proved the point with a single photograph the following year he devised a more elaborate setup with twenty-four cameras setup over a twenty foot length triggered by the horse’s hoofs as it galloped past. The resulting photographs were widely published (and later the basis for a book by Stanford) and a sensation.

A585ECBA-02D2-4601-87C1-990CD7B04A3D.jpg

Realizing that he was onto something, cystitis Eadweard invented the Zoopraxiscope which projected images from a rotating glass disk to give the impression of motion – creating the first movie projector.

In 2008 Mitchell f Chan and Brad Hindson created A Dream of Pastures for the Ontario Arts Council.




A Dream of Pastures is an interactive outdoor sculpture and animated light projection. On the exterior wall of the Art Gallery of Ontario, pharm the ghostly form of a horse glows on the shadowy brick. On the ground several meters in front of it, a stationary bicycle beckons for investigation from the viewer.

As the viewer pedals the bicycle, he discovers that the phantom horse moves accordingly, animated by a mysterious system of projecting lights and turning gears. The viewer pedals more vigorously, the gears rotate more quickly, and the horse of light breaks into a gallop. Sitting in the saddle, the viewer creates a shadow that lines up with the horse, casting himself as a jockey in the projected world, galloping through the empty pastures of a fictitious world at an exhilarating pace.

Eadweard Muybridge was hired by Leland Stanford to answer the question if a horse had all four legs in the air at any time at a full gallop. Although in 1878 he had already proved this with a single photograph the following year he devised a more elaborate setup with twenty-four cameras setup over a twenty foot length triggered by the horse’s hoofs as it galloped past. The resulting photographs were widely published (and later the basis for a book by Stanford) and a popular culture sensation.

A585ECBA-02D2-4601-87C1-990CD7B04A3D.jpg

Realizing that he was onto something, here Eadweard invented the Zoopraxiscope which projected images from a rotating glass disk to give the impression of motion – creating the first movie projector.

In 2008 Mitchell f Chan and Brad Hindson created A Dream of Pastures funded by Ontario Arts Council to be exhibited on the exterior of the Art Gallery of Ontario for Toronto’s Nuit Blanche All-Night contemporary art festival.


view 0,40,0″>


Mitchell says:

A Dream of Pastures is an interactive outdoor sculpture and animated light projection. On the exterior wall of the Art Gallery of Ontario, the ghostly form of a horse glows on the shadowy brick. On the ground several meters in front of it, a stationary bicycle beckons for investigation from the viewer.

As the viewer pedals the bicycle, he discovers that the phantom horse moves accordingly, animated by a mysterious system of projecting lights and turning gears. The viewer pedals more vigorously, the gears rotate more quickly, and the horse of light breaks into a gallop. Sitting in the saddle, the viewer creates a shadow that lines up with the horse, casting himself as a jockey in the projected world, galloping through the empty pastures of a fictitious world at an exhilarating pace.

It’s not clear to me if the connection is intentional or coincidence, but I’d like to think it’s a modern interactive interpretation of an important historical moment.

More information here

In 1878 Eadweard Muybridge was hired by Leland Stanford to answer the question if a horse had all four legs in the air at any time at a full gallop. Although he had already proved the point with a single photograph the following year he devised a more elaborate setup with twenty-four cameras setup over a twenty foot length triggered by the horse’s hoofs as it galloped past. The resulting photographs were widely published (and later the basis for a book by Stanford) and a sensation.

A585ECBA-02D2-4601-87C1-990CD7B04A3D.jpg

Realizing that he was onto something, cystitis Eadweard invented the Zoopraxiscope which projected images from a rotating glass disk to give the impression of motion – creating the first movie projector.

In 2008 Mitchell f Chan and Brad Hindson created A Dream of Pastures for the Ontario Arts Council.




A Dream of Pastures is an interactive outdoor sculpture and animated light projection. On the exterior wall of the Art Gallery of Ontario, pharm the ghostly form of a horse glows on the shadowy brick. On the ground several meters in front of it, a stationary bicycle beckons for investigation from the viewer.

As the viewer pedals the bicycle, he discovers that the phantom horse moves accordingly, animated by a mysterious system of projecting lights and turning gears. The viewer pedals more vigorously, the gears rotate more quickly, and the horse of light breaks into a gallop. Sitting in the saddle, the viewer creates a shadow that lines up with the horse, casting himself as a jockey in the projected world, galloping through the empty pastures of a fictitious world at an exhilarating pace.

In 1878 Eadweard Muybridge was hired by Leland Stanford to answer the question if a horse had all four legs in the air at any time at a full gallop. Although he had already proved the point with a single photograph the following year he devised a more elaborate setup with twenty-four cameras setup over a twenty foot length triggered by the horse’s hoofs as it galloped past. The resulting photographs were widely published (and later the basis for a book by Stanford) and a sensation.

A585ECBA-02D2-4601-87C1-990CD7B04A3D.jpg

Realizing that he was onto something, sick Eadweard invented the Zoopraxiscope which projected images from a rotating glass disk to give the impression of motion – creating the first movie projector.

In 2008 Mitchell f Chan and Brad Hindson created A Dream of Pastures for the Ontario Arts Council.




A Dream of Pastures is an interactive outdoor sculpture and animated light projection. On the exterior wall of the Art Gallery of Ontario, treatment the ghostly form of a horse glows on the shadowy brick. On the ground several meters in front of it, information pills a stationary bicycle beckons for investigation from the viewer.

As the viewer pedals the bicycle, he discovers that the phantom horse moves accordingly, animated by a mysterious system of projecting lights and turning gears. The viewer pedals more vigorously, the gears rotate more quickly, and the horse of light breaks into a gallop. Sitting in the saddle, the viewer creates a shadow that lines up with the horse, casting himself as a jockey in the projected world, galloping through the empty pastures of a fictitious world at an exhilarating pace.

Eadweard Muybridge was hired by Leland Stanford to answer the question if a horse had all four legs in the air at any time at a full gallop. Although in 1878 he had already proved this with a single photograph the following year he devised a more elaborate setup with twenty-four cameras setup over a twenty foot length triggered by the horse’s hoofs as it galloped past. The resulting photographs were widely published (and later the basis for a book by Stanford) and a popular culture sensation.

A585ECBA-02D2-4601-87C1-990CD7B04A3D.jpg

Realizing that he was onto something, here Eadweard invented the Zoopraxiscope which projected images from a rotating glass disk to give the impression of motion – creating the first movie projector.

In 2008 Mitchell f Chan and Brad Hindson created A Dream of Pastures funded by Ontario Arts Council to be exhibited on the exterior of the Art Gallery of Ontario for Toronto’s Nuit Blanche All-Night contemporary art festival.


view 0,40,0″>


Mitchell says:

A Dream of Pastures is an interactive outdoor sculpture and animated light projection. On the exterior wall of the Art Gallery of Ontario, the ghostly form of a horse glows on the shadowy brick. On the ground several meters in front of it, a stationary bicycle beckons for investigation from the viewer.

As the viewer pedals the bicycle, he discovers that the phantom horse moves accordingly, animated by a mysterious system of projecting lights and turning gears. The viewer pedals more vigorously, the gears rotate more quickly, and the horse of light breaks into a gallop. Sitting in the saddle, the viewer creates a shadow that lines up with the horse, casting himself as a jockey in the projected world, galloping through the empty pastures of a fictitious world at an exhilarating pace.

It’s not clear to me if the connection is intentional or coincidence, but I’d like to think it’s a modern interactive interpretation of an important historical moment.

More information here

In 1878 Eadweard Muybridge was hired by Leland Stanford to answer the question if a horse had all four legs in the air at any time at a full gallop. Although he had already proved the point with a single photograph the following year he devised a more elaborate setup with twenty-four cameras setup over a twenty foot length triggered by the horse’s hoofs as it galloped past. The resulting photographs were widely published (and later the basis for a book by Stanford) and a sensation.

A585ECBA-02D2-4601-87C1-990CD7B04A3D.jpg

Realizing that he was onto something, cystitis Eadweard invented the Zoopraxiscope which projected images from a rotating glass disk to give the impression of motion – creating the first movie projector.

In 2008 Mitchell f Chan and Brad Hindson created A Dream of Pastures for the Ontario Arts Council.




A Dream of Pastures is an interactive outdoor sculpture and animated light projection. On the exterior wall of the Art Gallery of Ontario, pharm the ghostly form of a horse glows on the shadowy brick. On the ground several meters in front of it, a stationary bicycle beckons for investigation from the viewer.

As the viewer pedals the bicycle, he discovers that the phantom horse moves accordingly, animated by a mysterious system of projecting lights and turning gears. The viewer pedals more vigorously, the gears rotate more quickly, and the horse of light breaks into a gallop. Sitting in the saddle, the viewer creates a shadow that lines up with the horse, casting himself as a jockey in the projected world, galloping through the empty pastures of a fictitious world at an exhilarating pace.

In 1878 Eadweard Muybridge was hired by Leland Stanford to answer the question if a horse had all four legs in the air at any time at a full gallop. Although he had already proved the point with a single photograph the following year he devised a more elaborate setup with twenty-four cameras setup over a twenty foot length triggered by the horse’s hoofs as it galloped past. The resulting photographs were widely published (and later the basis for a book by Stanford) and a sensation.

A585ECBA-02D2-4601-87C1-990CD7B04A3D.jpg

Realizing that he was onto something, sick Eadweard invented the Zoopraxiscope which projected images from a rotating glass disk to give the impression of motion – creating the first movie projector.

In 2008 Mitchell f Chan and Brad Hindson created A Dream of Pastures for the Ontario Arts Council.




A Dream of Pastures is an interactive outdoor sculpture and animated light projection. On the exterior wall of the Art Gallery of Ontario, treatment the ghostly form of a horse glows on the shadowy brick. On the ground several meters in front of it, information pills a stationary bicycle beckons for investigation from the viewer.

As the viewer pedals the bicycle, he discovers that the phantom horse moves accordingly, animated by a mysterious system of projecting lights and turning gears. The viewer pedals more vigorously, the gears rotate more quickly, and the horse of light breaks into a gallop. Sitting in the saddle, the viewer creates a shadow that lines up with the horse, casting himself as a jockey in the projected world, galloping through the empty pastures of a fictitious world at an exhilarating pace.

Eadweard Muybridge was hired by Leland Stanford to answer the question if a horse had all four legs in the air at any time at a full gallop. In 1878 he had already proved this with a single photograph the following year he devised a more elaborate setup with twenty-four cameras setup over a twenty foot length triggered by the horse’s hoofs as it galloped past. The resulting photographs were widely published (and later the basis for a book by Stanford) and a popular culture sensation.

A585ECBA-02D2-4601-87C1-990CD7B04A3D.jpg

Realizing that he was onto something, eczema Eadweard invented the Zoopraxiscope which projected images from a rotating glass disk to give the impression of motion – creating the first movie projector.

In 2008 Mitchell f Chan and Brad Hindson created A Dream of Pastures funded by Ontario Arts Council to be exhibited on the exterior of the Art Gallery of Ontario for Toronto’s Nuit Blanche All-Night contemporary art festival.


mycoplasmosis 0,40,0″>


Mitchell says:

A Dream of Pastures is an interactive outdoor sculpture and animated light projection. On the exterior wall of the Art Gallery of Ontario, the ghostly form of a horse glows on the shadowy brick. On the ground several meters in front of it, a stationary bicycle beckons for investigation from the viewer.

As the viewer pedals the bicycle, he discovers that the phantom horse moves accordingly, animated by a mysterious system of projecting lights and turning gears. The viewer pedals more vigorously, the gears rotate more quickly, and the horse of light breaks into a gallop. Sitting in the saddle, the viewer creates a shadow that lines up with the horse, casting himself as a jockey in the projected world, galloping through the empty pastures of a fictitious world at an exhilarating pace.

It’s not clear to me if the connection is intentional or coincidence, but I’d like to think it’s a modern interactive interpretation of an important historical moment.

More information here

Eadweard Muybridge was hired by Leland Stanford to answer the question if a horse had all four legs in the air at any time at a full gallop. Although in 1878 he had already proved this with a single photograph the following year he devised a more elaborate setup with twenty-four cameras setup over a twenty foot length triggered by the horse’s hoofs as it galloped past. The resulting photographs were widely published (and later the basis for a book by Stanford) and a popular culture sensation.

A585ECBA-02D2-4601-87C1-990CD7B04A3D.jpg

Realizing that he was onto something, here Eadweard invented the Zoopraxiscope which projected images from a rotating glass disk to give the impression of motion – creating the first movie projector.

In 2008 Mitchell f Chan and Brad Hindson created A Dream of Pastures funded by Ontario Arts Council to be exhibited on the exterior of the Art Gallery of Ontario for Toronto’s Nuit Blanche All-Night contemporary art festival.


view 0,40,0″>


Mitchell says:

A Dream of Pastures is an interactive outdoor sculpture and animated light projection. On the exterior wall of the Art Gallery of Ontario, the ghostly form of a horse glows on the shadowy brick. On the ground several meters in front of it, a stationary bicycle beckons for investigation from the viewer.

As the viewer pedals the bicycle, he discovers that the phantom horse moves accordingly, animated by a mysterious system of projecting lights and turning gears. The viewer pedals more vigorously, the gears rotate more quickly, and the horse of light breaks into a gallop. Sitting in the saddle, the viewer creates a shadow that lines up with the horse, casting himself as a jockey in the projected world, galloping through the empty pastures of a fictitious world at an exhilarating pace.

It’s not clear to me if the connection is intentional or coincidence, but I’d like to think it’s a modern interactive interpretation of an important historical moment.

More information here

In 1878 Eadweard Muybridge was hired by Leland Stanford to answer the question if a horse had all four legs in the air at any time at a full gallop. Although he had already proved the point with a single photograph the following year he devised a more elaborate setup with twenty-four cameras setup over a twenty foot length triggered by the horse’s hoofs as it galloped past. The resulting photographs were widely published (and later the basis for a book by Stanford) and a sensation.

A585ECBA-02D2-4601-87C1-990CD7B04A3D.jpg

Realizing that he was onto something, cystitis Eadweard invented the Zoopraxiscope which projected images from a rotating glass disk to give the impression of motion – creating the first movie projector.

In 2008 Mitchell f Chan and Brad Hindson created A Dream of Pastures for the Ontario Arts Council.




A Dream of Pastures is an interactive outdoor sculpture and animated light projection. On the exterior wall of the Art Gallery of Ontario, pharm the ghostly form of a horse glows on the shadowy brick. On the ground several meters in front of it, a stationary bicycle beckons for investigation from the viewer.

As the viewer pedals the bicycle, he discovers that the phantom horse moves accordingly, animated by a mysterious system of projecting lights and turning gears. The viewer pedals more vigorously, the gears rotate more quickly, and the horse of light breaks into a gallop. Sitting in the saddle, the viewer creates a shadow that lines up with the horse, casting himself as a jockey in the projected world, galloping through the empty pastures of a fictitious world at an exhilarating pace.

In 1878 Eadweard Muybridge was hired by Leland Stanford to answer the question if a horse had all four legs in the air at any time at a full gallop. Although he had already proved the point with a single photograph the following year he devised a more elaborate setup with twenty-four cameras setup over a twenty foot length triggered by the horse’s hoofs as it galloped past. The resulting photographs were widely published (and later the basis for a book by Stanford) and a sensation.

A585ECBA-02D2-4601-87C1-990CD7B04A3D.jpg

Realizing that he was onto something, sick Eadweard invented the Zoopraxiscope which projected images from a rotating glass disk to give the impression of motion – creating the first movie projector.

In 2008 Mitchell f Chan and Brad Hindson created A Dream of Pastures for the Ontario Arts Council.




A Dream of Pastures is an interactive outdoor sculpture and animated light projection. On the exterior wall of the Art Gallery of Ontario, treatment the ghostly form of a horse glows on the shadowy brick. On the ground several meters in front of it, information pills a stationary bicycle beckons for investigation from the viewer.

As the viewer pedals the bicycle, he discovers that the phantom horse moves accordingly, animated by a mysterious system of projecting lights and turning gears. The viewer pedals more vigorously, the gears rotate more quickly, and the horse of light breaks into a gallop. Sitting in the saddle, the viewer creates a shadow that lines up with the horse, casting himself as a jockey in the projected world, galloping through the empty pastures of a fictitious world at an exhilarating pace.

Eadweard Muybridge was hired by Leland Stanford to answer the question if a horse had all four legs in the air at any time at a full gallop. In 1878 he had already proved this with a single photograph the following year he devised a more elaborate setup with twenty-four cameras setup over a twenty foot length triggered by the horse’s hoofs as it galloped past. The resulting photographs were widely published (and later the basis for a book by Stanford) and a popular culture sensation.

A585ECBA-02D2-4601-87C1-990CD7B04A3D.jpg

Realizing that he was onto something, eczema Eadweard invented the Zoopraxiscope which projected images from a rotating glass disk to give the impression of motion – creating the first movie projector.

In 2008 Mitchell f Chan and Brad Hindson created A Dream of Pastures funded by Ontario Arts Council to be exhibited on the exterior of the Art Gallery of Ontario for Toronto’s Nuit Blanche All-Night contemporary art festival.


mycoplasmosis 0,40,0″>


Mitchell says:

A Dream of Pastures is an interactive outdoor sculpture and animated light projection. On the exterior wall of the Art Gallery of Ontario, the ghostly form of a horse glows on the shadowy brick. On the ground several meters in front of it, a stationary bicycle beckons for investigation from the viewer.

As the viewer pedals the bicycle, he discovers that the phantom horse moves accordingly, animated by a mysterious system of projecting lights and turning gears. The viewer pedals more vigorously, the gears rotate more quickly, and the horse of light breaks into a gallop. Sitting in the saddle, the viewer creates a shadow that lines up with the horse, casting himself as a jockey in the projected world, galloping through the empty pastures of a fictitious world at an exhilarating pace.

It’s not clear to me if the connection is intentional or coincidence, but I’d like to think it’s a modern interactive interpretation of an important historical moment.

More information here

In 1878 Eadweard Muybridge was hired by Leland Stanford to answer the question if a horse had all four legs in the air at any time at a full gallop. Although he had already proved the point with a single photograph the following year he devised a more elaborate setup with twenty-four cameras setup over a twenty foot length triggered by the horse’s hoofs as it galloped past. The resulting photographs were widely published (and later the basis for a book by Stanford) and a sensation.

A585ECBA-02D2-4601-87C1-990CD7B04A3D.jpg

Realizing that he was onto something, check Eadweard invented the Zoopraxiscope which projected images from a rotating glass disk to give the impression of motion – creating the first movie projector.

In 2008 Mitchell f Chan and Brad Hindson created A Dream of Pastures for the Ontario Arts Council.

A Dream of Pastures is an interactive outdoor sculpture and animated light projection. On the exterior wall of the Art Gallery of Ontario, the ghostly form of a horse glows on the shadowy brick. On the ground several meters in front of it, a stationary bicycle beckons for investigation from the viewer.

As the viewer pedals the bicycle, he discovers that the phantom horse moves accordingly, animated by a mysterious system of projecting lights and turning gears. The viewer pedals more vigorously, the gears rotate more quickly, and the horse of light breaks into a gallop. Sitting in the saddle, the viewer creates a shadow that lines up with the horse, casting himself as a jockey in the projected world, galloping through the empty pastures of a fictitious world at an exhilarating pace.

Eadweard Muybridge was hired by Leland Stanford to answer the question if a horse had all four legs in the air at any time at a full gallop. Although in 1878 he had already proved this with a single photograph the following year he devised a more elaborate setup with twenty-four cameras setup over a twenty foot length triggered by the horse’s hoofs as it galloped past. The resulting photographs were widely published (and later the basis for a book by Stanford) and a popular culture sensation.

A585ECBA-02D2-4601-87C1-990CD7B04A3D.jpg

Realizing that he was onto something, here Eadweard invented the Zoopraxiscope which projected images from a rotating glass disk to give the impression of motion – creating the first movie projector.

In 2008 Mitchell f Chan and Brad Hindson created A Dream of Pastures funded by Ontario Arts Council to be exhibited on the exterior of the Art Gallery of Ontario for Toronto’s Nuit Blanche All-Night contemporary art festival.


view 0,40,0″>


Mitchell says:

A Dream of Pastures is an interactive outdoor sculpture and animated light projection. On the exterior wall of the Art Gallery of Ontario, the ghostly form of a horse glows on the shadowy brick. On the ground several meters in front of it, a stationary bicycle beckons for investigation from the viewer.

As the viewer pedals the bicycle, he discovers that the phantom horse moves accordingly, animated by a mysterious system of projecting lights and turning gears. The viewer pedals more vigorously, the gears rotate more quickly, and the horse of light breaks into a gallop. Sitting in the saddle, the viewer creates a shadow that lines up with the horse, casting himself as a jockey in the projected world, galloping through the empty pastures of a fictitious world at an exhilarating pace.

It’s not clear to me if the connection is intentional or coincidence, but I’d like to think it’s a modern interactive interpretation of an important historical moment.

More information here

In 1878 Eadweard Muybridge was hired by Leland Stanford to answer the question if a horse had all four legs in the air at any time at a full gallop. Although he had already proved the point with a single photograph the following year he devised a more elaborate setup with twenty-four cameras setup over a twenty foot length triggered by the horse’s hoofs as it galloped past. The resulting photographs were widely published (and later the basis for a book by Stanford) and a sensation.

A585ECBA-02D2-4601-87C1-990CD7B04A3D.jpg

Realizing that he was onto something, cystitis Eadweard invented the Zoopraxiscope which projected images from a rotating glass disk to give the impression of motion – creating the first movie projector.

In 2008 Mitchell f Chan and Brad Hindson created A Dream of Pastures for the Ontario Arts Council.




A Dream of Pastures is an interactive outdoor sculpture and animated light projection. On the exterior wall of the Art Gallery of Ontario, pharm the ghostly form of a horse glows on the shadowy brick. On the ground several meters in front of it, a stationary bicycle beckons for investigation from the viewer.

As the viewer pedals the bicycle, he discovers that the phantom horse moves accordingly, animated by a mysterious system of projecting lights and turning gears. The viewer pedals more vigorously, the gears rotate more quickly, and the horse of light breaks into a gallop. Sitting in the saddle, the viewer creates a shadow that lines up with the horse, casting himself as a jockey in the projected world, galloping through the empty pastures of a fictitious world at an exhilarating pace.

In 1878 Eadweard Muybridge was hired by Leland Stanford to answer the question if a horse had all four legs in the air at any time at a full gallop. Although he had already proved the point with a single photograph the following year he devised a more elaborate setup with twenty-four cameras setup over a twenty foot length triggered by the horse’s hoofs as it galloped past. The resulting photographs were widely published (and later the basis for a book by Stanford) and a sensation.

A585ECBA-02D2-4601-87C1-990CD7B04A3D.jpg

Realizing that he was onto something, sick Eadweard invented the Zoopraxiscope which projected images from a rotating glass disk to give the impression of motion – creating the first movie projector.

In 2008 Mitchell f Chan and Brad Hindson created A Dream of Pastures for the Ontario Arts Council.




A Dream of Pastures is an interactive outdoor sculpture and animated light projection. On the exterior wall of the Art Gallery of Ontario, treatment the ghostly form of a horse glows on the shadowy brick. On the ground several meters in front of it, information pills a stationary bicycle beckons for investigation from the viewer.

As the viewer pedals the bicycle, he discovers that the phantom horse moves accordingly, animated by a mysterious system of projecting lights and turning gears. The viewer pedals more vigorously, the gears rotate more quickly, and the horse of light breaks into a gallop. Sitting in the saddle, the viewer creates a shadow that lines up with the horse, casting himself as a jockey in the projected world, galloping through the empty pastures of a fictitious world at an exhilarating pace.

Eadweard Muybridge was hired by Leland Stanford to answer the question if a horse had all four legs in the air at any time at a full gallop. In 1878 he had already proved this with a single photograph the following year he devised a more elaborate setup with twenty-four cameras setup over a twenty foot length triggered by the horse’s hoofs as it galloped past. The resulting photographs were widely published (and later the basis for a book by Stanford) and a popular culture sensation.

A585ECBA-02D2-4601-87C1-990CD7B04A3D.jpg

Realizing that he was onto something, eczema Eadweard invented the Zoopraxiscope which projected images from a rotating glass disk to give the impression of motion – creating the first movie projector.

In 2008 Mitchell f Chan and Brad Hindson created A Dream of Pastures funded by Ontario Arts Council to be exhibited on the exterior of the Art Gallery of Ontario for Toronto’s Nuit Blanche All-Night contemporary art festival.


mycoplasmosis 0,40,0″>


Mitchell says:

A Dream of Pastures is an interactive outdoor sculpture and animated light projection. On the exterior wall of the Art Gallery of Ontario, the ghostly form of a horse glows on the shadowy brick. On the ground several meters in front of it, a stationary bicycle beckons for investigation from the viewer.

As the viewer pedals the bicycle, he discovers that the phantom horse moves accordingly, animated by a mysterious system of projecting lights and turning gears. The viewer pedals more vigorously, the gears rotate more quickly, and the horse of light breaks into a gallop. Sitting in the saddle, the viewer creates a shadow that lines up with the horse, casting himself as a jockey in the projected world, galloping through the empty pastures of a fictitious world at an exhilarating pace.

It’s not clear to me if the connection is intentional or coincidence, but I’d like to think it’s a modern interactive interpretation of an important historical moment.

More information here

In 1878 Eadweard Muybridge was hired by Leland Stanford to answer the question if a horse had all four legs in the air at any time at a full gallop. Although he had already proved the point with a single photograph the following year he devised a more elaborate setup with twenty-four cameras setup over a twenty foot length triggered by the horse’s hoofs as it galloped past. The resulting photographs were widely published (and later the basis for a book by Stanford) and a sensation.

A585ECBA-02D2-4601-87C1-990CD7B04A3D.jpg

Realizing that he was onto something, check Eadweard invented the Zoopraxiscope which projected images from a rotating glass disk to give the impression of motion – creating the first movie projector.

In 2008 Mitchell f Chan and Brad Hindson created A Dream of Pastures for the Ontario Arts Council.

A Dream of Pastures is an interactive outdoor sculpture and animated light projection. On the exterior wall of the Art Gallery of Ontario, the ghostly form of a horse glows on the shadowy brick. On the ground several meters in front of it, a stationary bicycle beckons for investigation from the viewer.

As the viewer pedals the bicycle, he discovers that the phantom horse moves accordingly, animated by a mysterious system of projecting lights and turning gears. The viewer pedals more vigorously, the gears rotate more quickly, and the horse of light breaks into a gallop. Sitting in the saddle, the viewer creates a shadow that lines up with the horse, casting himself as a jockey in the projected world, galloping through the empty pastures of a fictitious world at an exhilarating pace.

In 1878 Eadweard Muybridge was hired by Leland Stanford to answer the question if a horse had all four legs in the air at any time at a full gallop. Although he had already proved the point with a single photograph the following year he devised a more elaborate setup with twenty-four cameras setup over a twenty foot length triggered by the horse’s hoofs as it galloped past. The resulting photographs were widely published (and later the basis for a book by Stanford) and a sensation.

A585ECBA-02D2-4601-87C1-990CD7B04A3D.jpg

Realizing that he was onto something, cystitis Eadweard invented the Zoopraxiscope which projected images from a rotating glass disk to give the impression of motion – creating the first movie projector.

In 2008 Mitchell f Chan and Brad Hindson created A Dream of Pastures for the Ontario Arts Council.


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A Dream of Pastures is an interactive outdoor sculpture and animated light projection. On the exterior wall of the Art Gallery of Ontario, the ghostly form of a horse glows on the shadowy brick. On the ground several meters in front of it, a stationary bicycle beckons for investigation from the viewer.

As the viewer pedals the bicycle, he discovers that the phantom horse moves accordingly, animated by a mysterious system of projecting lights and turning gears. The viewer pedals more vigorously, the gears rotate more quickly, and the horse of light breaks into a gallop. Sitting in the saddle, the viewer creates a shadow that lines up with the horse, casting himself as a jockey in the projected world, galloping through the empty pastures of a fictitious world at an exhilarating pace.

Eadweard Muybridge was hired by Leland Stanford to answer the question if a horse had all four legs in the air at any time at a full gallop. Although in 1878 he had already proved this with a single photograph the following year he devised a more elaborate setup with twenty-four cameras setup over a twenty foot length triggered by the horse’s hoofs as it galloped past. The resulting photographs were widely published (and later the basis for a book by Stanford) and a popular culture sensation.

A585ECBA-02D2-4601-87C1-990CD7B04A3D.jpg

Realizing that he was onto something, here Eadweard invented the Zoopraxiscope which projected images from a rotating glass disk to give the impression of motion – creating the first movie projector.

In 2008 Mitchell f Chan and Brad Hindson created A Dream of Pastures funded by Ontario Arts Council to be exhibited on the exterior of the Art Gallery of Ontario for Toronto’s Nuit Blanche All-Night contemporary art festival.


view 0,40,0″>


Mitchell says:

A Dream of Pastures is an interactive outdoor sculpture and animated light projection. On the exterior wall of the Art Gallery of Ontario, the ghostly form of a horse glows on the shadowy brick. On the ground several meters in front of it, a stationary bicycle beckons for investigation from the viewer.

As the viewer pedals the bicycle, he discovers that the phantom horse moves accordingly, animated by a mysterious system of projecting lights and turning gears. The viewer pedals more vigorously, the gears rotate more quickly, and the horse of light breaks into a gallop. Sitting in the saddle, the viewer creates a shadow that lines up with the horse, casting himself as a jockey in the projected world, galloping through the empty pastures of a fictitious world at an exhilarating pace.

It’s not clear to me if the connection is intentional or coincidence, but I’d like to think it’s a modern interactive interpretation of an important historical moment.

More information here

In 1878 Eadweard Muybridge was hired by Leland Stanford to answer the question if a horse had all four legs in the air at any time at a full gallop. Although he had already proved the point with a single photograph the following year he devised a more elaborate setup with twenty-four cameras setup over a twenty foot length triggered by the horse’s hoofs as it galloped past. The resulting photographs were widely published (and later the basis for a book by Stanford) and a sensation.

A585ECBA-02D2-4601-87C1-990CD7B04A3D.jpg

Realizing that he was onto something, cystitis Eadweard invented the Zoopraxiscope which projected images from a rotating glass disk to give the impression of motion – creating the first movie projector.

In 2008 Mitchell f Chan and Brad Hindson created A Dream of Pastures for the Ontario Arts Council.




A Dream of Pastures is an interactive outdoor sculpture and animated light projection. On the exterior wall of the Art Gallery of Ontario, pharm the ghostly form of a horse glows on the shadowy brick. On the ground several meters in front of it, a stationary bicycle beckons for investigation from the viewer.

As the viewer pedals the bicycle, he discovers that the phantom horse moves accordingly, animated by a mysterious system of projecting lights and turning gears. The viewer pedals more vigorously, the gears rotate more quickly, and the horse of light breaks into a gallop. Sitting in the saddle, the viewer creates a shadow that lines up with the horse, casting himself as a jockey in the projected world, galloping through the empty pastures of a fictitious world at an exhilarating pace.

In 1878 Eadweard Muybridge was hired by Leland Stanford to answer the question if a horse had all four legs in the air at any time at a full gallop. Although he had already proved the point with a single photograph the following year he devised a more elaborate setup with twenty-four cameras setup over a twenty foot length triggered by the horse’s hoofs as it galloped past. The resulting photographs were widely published (and later the basis for a book by Stanford) and a sensation.

A585ECBA-02D2-4601-87C1-990CD7B04A3D.jpg

Realizing that he was onto something, sick Eadweard invented the Zoopraxiscope which projected images from a rotating glass disk to give the impression of motion – creating the first movie projector.

In 2008 Mitchell f Chan and Brad Hindson created A Dream of Pastures for the Ontario Arts Council.




A Dream of Pastures is an interactive outdoor sculpture and animated light projection. On the exterior wall of the Art Gallery of Ontario, treatment the ghostly form of a horse glows on the shadowy brick. On the ground several meters in front of it, information pills a stationary bicycle beckons for investigation from the viewer.

As the viewer pedals the bicycle, he discovers that the phantom horse moves accordingly, animated by a mysterious system of projecting lights and turning gears. The viewer pedals more vigorously, the gears rotate more quickly, and the horse of light breaks into a gallop. Sitting in the saddle, the viewer creates a shadow that lines up with the horse, casting himself as a jockey in the projected world, galloping through the empty pastures of a fictitious world at an exhilarating pace.

Eadweard Muybridge was hired by Leland Stanford to answer the question if a horse had all four legs in the air at any time at a full gallop. In 1878 he had already proved this with a single photograph the following year he devised a more elaborate setup with twenty-four cameras setup over a twenty foot length triggered by the horse’s hoofs as it galloped past. The resulting photographs were widely published (and later the basis for a book by Stanford) and a popular culture sensation.

A585ECBA-02D2-4601-87C1-990CD7B04A3D.jpg

Realizing that he was onto something, eczema Eadweard invented the Zoopraxiscope which projected images from a rotating glass disk to give the impression of motion – creating the first movie projector.

In 2008 Mitchell f Chan and Brad Hindson created A Dream of Pastures funded by Ontario Arts Council to be exhibited on the exterior of the Art Gallery of Ontario for Toronto’s Nuit Blanche All-Night contemporary art festival.


mycoplasmosis 0,40,0″>


Mitchell says:

A Dream of Pastures is an interactive outdoor sculpture and animated light projection. On the exterior wall of the Art Gallery of Ontario, the ghostly form of a horse glows on the shadowy brick. On the ground several meters in front of it, a stationary bicycle beckons for investigation from the viewer.

As the viewer pedals the bicycle, he discovers that the phantom horse moves accordingly, animated by a mysterious system of projecting lights and turning gears. The viewer pedals more vigorously, the gears rotate more quickly, and the horse of light breaks into a gallop. Sitting in the saddle, the viewer creates a shadow that lines up with the horse, casting himself as a jockey in the projected world, galloping through the empty pastures of a fictitious world at an exhilarating pace.

It’s not clear to me if the connection is intentional or coincidence, but I’d like to think it’s a modern interactive interpretation of an important historical moment.

More information here

In 1878 Eadweard Muybridge was hired by Leland Stanford to answer the question if a horse had all four legs in the air at any time at a full gallop. Although he had already proved the point with a single photograph the following year he devised a more elaborate setup with twenty-four cameras setup over a twenty foot length triggered by the horse’s hoofs as it galloped past. The resulting photographs were widely published (and later the basis for a book by Stanford) and a sensation.

A585ECBA-02D2-4601-87C1-990CD7B04A3D.jpg

Realizing that he was onto something, check Eadweard invented the Zoopraxiscope which projected images from a rotating glass disk to give the impression of motion – creating the first movie projector.

In 2008 Mitchell f Chan and Brad Hindson created A Dream of Pastures for the Ontario Arts Council.

A Dream of Pastures is an interactive outdoor sculpture and animated light projection. On the exterior wall of the Art Gallery of Ontario, the ghostly form of a horse glows on the shadowy brick. On the ground several meters in front of it, a stationary bicycle beckons for investigation from the viewer.

As the viewer pedals the bicycle, he discovers that the phantom horse moves accordingly, animated by a mysterious system of projecting lights and turning gears. The viewer pedals more vigorously, the gears rotate more quickly, and the horse of light breaks into a gallop. Sitting in the saddle, the viewer creates a shadow that lines up with the horse, casting himself as a jockey in the projected world, galloping through the empty pastures of a fictitious world at an exhilarating pace.

In 1878 Eadweard Muybridge was hired by Leland Stanford to answer the question if a horse had all four legs in the air at any time at a full gallop. Although he had already proved the point with a single photograph the following year he devised a more elaborate setup with twenty-four cameras setup over a twenty foot length triggered by the horse’s hoofs as it galloped past. The resulting photographs were widely published (and later the basis for a book by Stanford) and a sensation.

A585ECBA-02D2-4601-87C1-990CD7B04A3D.jpg

Realizing that he was onto something, cystitis Eadweard invented the Zoopraxiscope which projected images from a rotating glass disk to give the impression of motion – creating the first movie projector.

In 2008 Mitchell f Chan and Brad Hindson created A Dream of Pastures for the Ontario Arts Council.


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A Dream of Pastures is an interactive outdoor sculpture and animated light projection. On the exterior wall of the Art Gallery of Ontario, the ghostly form of a horse glows on the shadowy brick. On the ground several meters in front of it, a stationary bicycle beckons for investigation from the viewer.

As the viewer pedals the bicycle, he discovers that the phantom horse moves accordingly, animated by a mysterious system of projecting lights and turning gears. The viewer pedals more vigorously, the gears rotate more quickly, and the horse of light breaks into a gallop. Sitting in the saddle, the viewer creates a shadow that lines up with the horse, casting himself as a jockey in the projected world, galloping through the empty pastures of a fictitious world at an exhilarating pace.

In 1878 Eadweard Muybridge was hired by Leland Stanford to answer the question if a horse had all four legs in the air at any time at a full gallop. Although he had already proved the point with a single photograph the following year he devised amore elaborate setup with twenty-four cameras setup over a twenty foot length triggered by the horse’s hoofs as it galloped past. The resulting photographs were widely published (and later the basis for a book by Stanford) and a sensation.

A585ECBA-02D2-4601-87C1-990CD7B04A3D.jpg

Realizing that he was onto something, troche Eadweard invented the Zoopraxiscope which projected images from a rotating glass disk to give the impression of motion – creating the first movie projector.

In 2008 Mitchell f Chan and Brad Hindson created A Dream of Pastures for the Ontario Arts Council.


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Mitchell says:

A Dream of Pastures is an interactive outdoor sculpture and animated light projection. On the exterior wall of the Art Gallery of Ontario, the ghostly form of a horse glows on the shadowy brick. On the ground several meters in front of it, a stationary bicycle beckons for investigation from the viewer.

As the viewer pedals the bicycle, he discovers that the phantom horse moves accordingly, animated by a mysterious system of projecting lights and turning gears. The viewer pedals more vigorously, the gears rotate more quickly, and the horse of light breaks into a gallop. Sitting in the saddle, the viewer creates a shadow that lines up with the horse, casting himself as a jockey in the projected world, galloping through the empty pastures of a fictitious world at an exhilarating pace.

Eadweard Muybridge was hired by Leland Stanford to answer the question if a horse had all four legs in the air at any time at a full gallop. Although in 1878 he had already proved this with a single photograph the following year he devised a more elaborate setup with twenty-four cameras setup over a twenty foot length triggered by the horse’s hoofs as it galloped past. The resulting photographs were widely published (and later the basis for a book by Stanford) and a popular culture sensation.

A585ECBA-02D2-4601-87C1-990CD7B04A3D.jpg

Realizing that he was onto something, here Eadweard invented the Zoopraxiscope which projected images from a rotating glass disk to give the impression of motion – creating the first movie projector.

In 2008 Mitchell f Chan and Brad Hindson created A Dream of Pastures funded by Ontario Arts Council to be exhibited on the exterior of the Art Gallery of Ontario for Toronto’s Nuit Blanche All-Night contemporary art festival.


view 0,40,0″>


Mitchell says:

A Dream of Pastures is an interactive outdoor sculpture and animated light projection. On the exterior wall of the Art Gallery of Ontario, the ghostly form of a horse glows on the shadowy brick. On the ground several meters in front of it, a stationary bicycle beckons for investigation from the viewer.

As the viewer pedals the bicycle, he discovers that the phantom horse moves accordingly, animated by a mysterious system of projecting lights and turning gears. The viewer pedals more vigorously, the gears rotate more quickly, and the horse of light breaks into a gallop. Sitting in the saddle, the viewer creates a shadow that lines up with the horse, casting himself as a jockey in the projected world, galloping through the empty pastures of a fictitious world at an exhilarating pace.

It’s not clear to me if the connection is intentional or coincidence, but I’d like to think it’s a modern interactive interpretation of an important historical moment.

More information here

Eadweard Muybridge was hired by Leland Stanford to answer the question if a horse had all four legs in the air at any time at a full gallop. Although in 1878 he had already proved this with a single photograph the following year he devised a more elaborate setup with twenty-four cameras setup over a twenty foot length triggered by the horse’s hoofs as it galloped past. The resulting photographs were widely published (and later the basis for a book by Stanford) and a popular culture sensation.

A585ECBA-02D2-4601-87C1-990CD7B04A3D.jpg

Realizing that he was onto something, here Eadweard invented the Zoopraxiscope which projected images from a rotating glass disk to give the impression of motion – creating the first movie projector.

In 2008 Mitchell f Chan and Brad Hindson created A Dream of Pastures funded by Ontario Arts Council to be exhibited on the exterior of the Art Gallery of Ontario for Toronto’s Nuit Blanche All-Night contemporary art festival.


view 0,40,0″>


Mitchell says:

A Dream of Pastures is an interactive outdoor sculpture and animated light projection. On the exterior wall of the Art Gallery of Ontario, the ghostly form of a horse glows on the shadowy brick. On the ground several meters in front of it, a stationary bicycle beckons for investigation from the viewer.

As the viewer pedals the bicycle, he discovers that the phantom horse moves accordingly, animated by a mysterious system of projecting lights and turning gears. The viewer pedals more vigorously, the gears rotate more quickly, and the horse of light breaks into a gallop. Sitting in the saddle, the viewer creates a shadow that lines up with the horse, casting himself as a jockey in the projected world, galloping through the empty pastures of a fictitious world at an exhilarating pace.

It’s not clear to me if the connection is intentional or coincidence, but I’d like to think it’s a modern interactive interpretation of an important historical moment.

More information here

In 1878 Eadweard Muybridge was hired by Leland Stanford to answer the question if a horse had all four legs in the air at any time at a full gallop. Although he had already proved the point with a single photograph the following year he devised a more elaborate setup with twenty-four cameras setup over a twenty foot length triggered by the horse’s hoofs as it galloped past. The resulting photographs were widely published (and later the basis for a book by Stanford) and a sensation.

A585ECBA-02D2-4601-87C1-990CD7B04A3D.jpg

Realizing that he was onto something, cystitis Eadweard invented the Zoopraxiscope which projected images from a rotating glass disk to give the impression of motion – creating the first movie projector.

In 2008 Mitchell f Chan and Brad Hindson created A Dream of Pastures for the Ontario Arts Council.




A Dream of Pastures is an interactive outdoor sculpture and animated light projection. On the exterior wall of the Art Gallery of Ontario, pharm the ghostly form of a horse glows on the shadowy brick. On the ground several meters in front of it, a stationary bicycle beckons for investigation from the viewer.

As the viewer pedals the bicycle, he discovers that the phantom horse moves accordingly, animated by a mysterious system of projecting lights and turning gears. The viewer pedals more vigorously, the gears rotate more quickly, and the horse of light breaks into a gallop. Sitting in the saddle, the viewer creates a shadow that lines up with the horse, casting himself as a jockey in the projected world, galloping through the empty pastures of a fictitious world at an exhilarating pace.

Eadweard Muybridge was hired by Leland Stanford to answer the question if a horse had all four legs in the air at any time at a full gallop. Although in 1878 he had already proved this with a single photograph the following year he devised a more elaborate setup with twenty-four cameras setup over a twenty foot length triggered by the horse’s hoofs as it galloped past. The resulting photographs were widely published (and later the basis for a book by Stanford) and a popular culture sensation.

A585ECBA-02D2-4601-87C1-990CD7B04A3D.jpg

Realizing that he was onto something, here Eadweard invented the Zoopraxiscope which projected images from a rotating glass disk to give the impression of motion – creating the first movie projector.

In 2008 Mitchell f Chan and Brad Hindson created A Dream of Pastures funded by Ontario Arts Council to be exhibited on the exterior of the Art Gallery of Ontario for Toronto’s Nuit Blanche All-Night contemporary art festival.


view 0,40,0″>


Mitchell says:

A Dream of Pastures is an interactive outdoor sculpture and animated light projection. On the exterior wall of the Art Gallery of Ontario, the ghostly form of a horse glows on the shadowy brick. On the ground several meters in front of it, a stationary bicycle beckons for investigation from the viewer.

As the viewer pedals the bicycle, he discovers that the phantom horse moves accordingly, animated by a mysterious system of projecting lights and turning gears. The viewer pedals more vigorously, the gears rotate more quickly, and the horse of light breaks into a gallop. Sitting in the saddle, the viewer creates a shadow that lines up with the horse, casting himself as a jockey in the projected world, galloping through the empty pastures of a fictitious world at an exhilarating pace.

It’s not clear to me if the connection is intentional or coincidence, but I’d like to think it’s a modern interactive interpretation of an important historical moment.

More information here

In 1878 Eadweard Muybridge was hired by Leland Stanford to answer the question if a horse had all four legs in the air at any time at a full gallop. Although he had already proved the point with a single photograph the following year he devised a more elaborate setup with twenty-four cameras setup over a twenty foot length triggered by the horse’s hoofs as it galloped past. The resulting photographs were widely published (and later the basis for a book by Stanford) and a sensation.

A585ECBA-02D2-4601-87C1-990CD7B04A3D.jpg

Realizing that he was onto something, cystitis Eadweard invented the Zoopraxiscope which projected images from a rotating glass disk to give the impression of motion – creating the first movie projector.

In 2008 Mitchell f Chan and Brad Hindson created A Dream of Pastures for the Ontario Arts Council.




A Dream of Pastures is an interactive outdoor sculpture and animated light projection. On the exterior wall of the Art Gallery of Ontario, pharm the ghostly form of a horse glows on the shadowy brick. On the ground several meters in front of it, a stationary bicycle beckons for investigation from the viewer.

As the viewer pedals the bicycle, he discovers that the phantom horse moves accordingly, animated by a mysterious system of projecting lights and turning gears. The viewer pedals more vigorously, the gears rotate more quickly, and the horse of light breaks into a gallop. Sitting in the saddle, the viewer creates a shadow that lines up with the horse, casting himself as a jockey in the projected world, galloping through the empty pastures of a fictitious world at an exhilarating pace.

In 1878 Eadweard Muybridge was hired by Leland Stanford to answer the question if a horse had all four legs in the air at any time at a full gallop. Although he had already proved the point with a single photograph the following year he devised a more elaborate setup with twenty-four cameras setup over a twenty foot length triggered by the horse’s hoofs as it galloped past. The resulting photographs were widely published (and later the basis for a book by Stanford) and a sensation.

A585ECBA-02D2-4601-87C1-990CD7B04A3D.jpg

Realizing that he was onto something, sick Eadweard invented the Zoopraxiscope which projected images from a rotating glass disk to give the impression of motion – creating the first movie projector.

In 2008 Mitchell f Chan and Brad Hindson created A Dream of Pastures for the Ontario Arts Council.




A Dream of Pastures is an interactive outdoor sculpture and animated light projection. On the exterior wall of the Art Gallery of Ontario, treatment the ghostly form of a horse glows on the shadowy brick. On the ground several meters in front of it, information pills a stationary bicycle beckons for investigation from the viewer.

As the viewer pedals the bicycle, he discovers that the phantom horse moves accordingly, animated by a mysterious system of projecting lights and turning gears. The viewer pedals more vigorously, the gears rotate more quickly, and the horse of light breaks into a gallop. Sitting in the saddle, the viewer creates a shadow that lines up with the horse, casting himself as a jockey in the projected world, galloping through the empty pastures of a fictitious world at an exhilarating pace.

Eadweard Muybridge was hired by Leland Stanford to answer the question if a horse had all four legs in the air at any time at a full gallop. Although in 1878 he had already proved this with a single photograph the following year he devised a more elaborate setup with twenty-four cameras setup over a twenty foot length triggered by the horse’s hoofs as it galloped past. The resulting photographs were widely published (and later the basis for a book by Stanford) and a popular culture sensation.

A585ECBA-02D2-4601-87C1-990CD7B04A3D.jpg

Realizing that he was onto something, here Eadweard invented the Zoopraxiscope which projected images from a rotating glass disk to give the impression of motion – creating the first movie projector.

In 2008 Mitchell f Chan and Brad Hindson created A Dream of Pastures funded by Ontario Arts Council to be exhibited on the exterior of the Art Gallery of Ontario for Toronto’s Nuit Blanche All-Night contemporary art festival.


view 0,40,0″>


Mitchell says:

A Dream of Pastures is an interactive outdoor sculpture and animated light projection. On the exterior wall of the Art Gallery of Ontario, the ghostly form of a horse glows on the shadowy brick. On the ground several meters in front of it, a stationary bicycle beckons for investigation from the viewer.

As the viewer pedals the bicycle, he discovers that the phantom horse moves accordingly, animated by a mysterious system of projecting lights and turning gears. The viewer pedals more vigorously, the gears rotate more quickly, and the horse of light breaks into a gallop. Sitting in the saddle, the viewer creates a shadow that lines up with the horse, casting himself as a jockey in the projected world, galloping through the empty pastures of a fictitious world at an exhilarating pace.

It’s not clear to me if the connection is intentional or coincidence, but I’d like to think it’s a modern interactive interpretation of an important historical moment.

More information here

In 1878 Eadweard Muybridge was hired by Leland Stanford to answer the question if a horse had all four legs in the air at any time at a full gallop. Although he had already proved the point with a single photograph the following year he devised a more elaborate setup with twenty-four cameras setup over a twenty foot length triggered by the horse’s hoofs as it galloped past. The resulting photographs were widely published (and later the basis for a book by Stanford) and a sensation.

A585ECBA-02D2-4601-87C1-990CD7B04A3D.jpg

Realizing that he was onto something, cystitis Eadweard invented the Zoopraxiscope which projected images from a rotating glass disk to give the impression of motion – creating the first movie projector.

In 2008 Mitchell f Chan and Brad Hindson created A Dream of Pastures for the Ontario Arts Council.




A Dream of Pastures is an interactive outdoor sculpture and animated light projection. On the exterior wall of the Art Gallery of Ontario, pharm the ghostly form of a horse glows on the shadowy brick. On the ground several meters in front of it, a stationary bicycle beckons for investigation from the viewer.

As the viewer pedals the bicycle, he discovers that the phantom horse moves accordingly, animated by a mysterious system of projecting lights and turning gears. The viewer pedals more vigorously, the gears rotate more quickly, and the horse of light breaks into a gallop. Sitting in the saddle, the viewer creates a shadow that lines up with the horse, casting himself as a jockey in the projected world, galloping through the empty pastures of a fictitious world at an exhilarating pace.

In 1878 Eadweard Muybridge was hired by Leland Stanford to answer the question if a horse had all four legs in the air at any time at a full gallop. Although he had already proved the point with a single photograph the following year he devised a more elaborate setup with twenty-four cameras setup over a twenty foot length triggered by the horse’s hoofs as it galloped past. The resulting photographs were widely published (and later the basis for a book by Stanford) and a sensation.

A585ECBA-02D2-4601-87C1-990CD7B04A3D.jpg

Realizing that he was onto something, sick Eadweard invented the Zoopraxiscope which projected images from a rotating glass disk to give the impression of motion – creating the first movie projector.

In 2008 Mitchell f Chan and Brad Hindson created A Dream of Pastures for the Ontario Arts Council.




A Dream of Pastures is an interactive outdoor sculpture and animated light projection. On the exterior wall of the Art Gallery of Ontario, treatment the ghostly form of a horse glows on the shadowy brick. On the ground several meters in front of it, information pills a stationary bicycle beckons for investigation from the viewer.

As the viewer pedals the bicycle, he discovers that the phantom horse moves accordingly, animated by a mysterious system of projecting lights and turning gears. The viewer pedals more vigorously, the gears rotate more quickly, and the horse of light breaks into a gallop. Sitting in the saddle, the viewer creates a shadow that lines up with the horse, casting himself as a jockey in the projected world, galloping through the empty pastures of a fictitious world at an exhilarating pace.

Eadweard Muybridge was hired by Leland Stanford to answer the question if a horse had all four legs in the air at any time at a full gallop. In 1878 he had already proved this with a single photograph the following year he devised a more elaborate setup with twenty-four cameras setup over a twenty foot length triggered by the horse’s hoofs as it galloped past. The resulting photographs were widely published (and later the basis for a book by Stanford) and a popular culture sensation.

A585ECBA-02D2-4601-87C1-990CD7B04A3D.jpg

Realizing that he was onto something, eczema Eadweard invented the Zoopraxiscope which projected images from a rotating glass disk to give the impression of motion – creating the first movie projector.

In 2008 Mitchell f Chan and Brad Hindson created A Dream of Pastures funded by Ontario Arts Council to be exhibited on the exterior of the Art Gallery of Ontario for Toronto’s Nuit Blanche All-Night contemporary art festival.


mycoplasmosis 0,40,0″>


Mitchell says:

A Dream of Pastures is an interactive outdoor sculpture and animated light projection. On the exterior wall of the Art Gallery of Ontario, the ghostly form of a horse glows on the shadowy brick. On the ground several meters in front of it, a stationary bicycle beckons for investigation from the viewer.

As the viewer pedals the bicycle, he discovers that the phantom horse moves accordingly, animated by a mysterious system of projecting lights and turning gears. The viewer pedals more vigorously, the gears rotate more quickly, and the horse of light breaks into a gallop. Sitting in the saddle, the viewer creates a shadow that lines up with the horse, casting himself as a jockey in the projected world, galloping through the empty pastures of a fictitious world at an exhilarating pace.

It’s not clear to me if the connection is intentional or coincidence, but I’d like to think it’s a modern interactive interpretation of an important historical moment.

More information here

Eadweard Muybridge was hired by Leland Stanford to answer the question if a horse had all four legs in the air at any time at a full gallop. Although in 1878 he had already proved this with a single photograph the following year he devised a more elaborate setup with twenty-four cameras setup over a twenty foot length triggered by the horse’s hoofs as it galloped past. The resulting photographs were widely published (and later the basis for a book by Stanford) and a popular culture sensation.

A585ECBA-02D2-4601-87C1-990CD7B04A3D.jpg

Realizing that he was onto something, here Eadweard invented the Zoopraxiscope which projected images from a rotating glass disk to give the impression of motion – creating the first movie projector.

In 2008 Mitchell f Chan and Brad Hindson created A Dream of Pastures funded by Ontario Arts Council to be exhibited on the exterior of the Art Gallery of Ontario for Toronto’s Nuit Blanche All-Night contemporary art festival.


view 0,40,0″>


Mitchell says:

A Dream of Pastures is an interactive outdoor sculpture and animated light projection. On the exterior wall of the Art Gallery of Ontario, the ghostly form of a horse glows on the shadowy brick. On the ground several meters in front of it, a stationary bicycle beckons for investigation from the viewer.

As the viewer pedals the bicycle, he discovers that the phantom horse moves accordingly, animated by a mysterious system of projecting lights and turning gears. The viewer pedals more vigorously, the gears rotate more quickly, and the horse of light breaks into a gallop. Sitting in the saddle, the viewer creates a shadow that lines up with the horse, casting himself as a jockey in the projected world, galloping through the empty pastures of a fictitious world at an exhilarating pace.

It’s not clear to me if the connection is intentional or coincidence, but I’d like to think it’s a modern interactive interpretation of an important historical moment.

More information here

In 1878 Eadweard Muybridge was hired by Leland Stanford to answer the question if a horse had all four legs in the air at any time at a full gallop. Although he had already proved the point with a single photograph the following year he devised a more elaborate setup with twenty-four cameras setup over a twenty foot length triggered by the horse’s hoofs as it galloped past. The resulting photographs were widely published (and later the basis for a book by Stanford) and a sensation.

A585ECBA-02D2-4601-87C1-990CD7B04A3D.jpg

Realizing that he was onto something, cystitis Eadweard invented the Zoopraxiscope which projected images from a rotating glass disk to give the impression of motion – creating the first movie projector.

In 2008 Mitchell f Chan and Brad Hindson created A Dream of Pastures for the Ontario Arts Council.




A Dream of Pastures is an interactive outdoor sculpture and animated light projection. On the exterior wall of the Art Gallery of Ontario, pharm the ghostly form of a horse glows on the shadowy brick. On the ground several meters in front of it, a stationary bicycle beckons for investigation from the viewer.

As the viewer pedals the bicycle, he discovers that the phantom horse moves accordingly, animated by a mysterious system of projecting lights and turning gears. The viewer pedals more vigorously, the gears rotate more quickly, and the horse of light breaks into a gallop. Sitting in the saddle, the viewer creates a shadow that lines up with the horse, casting himself as a jockey in the projected world, galloping through the empty pastures of a fictitious world at an exhilarating pace.

In 1878 Eadweard Muybridge was hired by Leland Stanford to answer the question if a horse had all four legs in the air at any time at a full gallop. Although he had already proved the point with a single photograph the following year he devised a more elaborate setup with twenty-four cameras setup over a twenty foot length triggered by the horse’s hoofs as it galloped past. The resulting photographs were widely published (and later the basis for a book by Stanford) and a sensation.

A585ECBA-02D2-4601-87C1-990CD7B04A3D.jpg

Realizing that he was onto something, sick Eadweard invented the Zoopraxiscope which projected images from a rotating glass disk to give the impression of motion – creating the first movie projector.

In 2008 Mitchell f Chan and Brad Hindson created A Dream of Pastures for the Ontario Arts Council.




A Dream of Pastures is an interactive outdoor sculpture and animated light projection. On the exterior wall of the Art Gallery of Ontario, treatment the ghostly form of a horse glows on the shadowy brick. On the ground several meters in front of it, information pills a stationary bicycle beckons for investigation from the viewer.

As the viewer pedals the bicycle, he discovers that the phantom horse moves accordingly, animated by a mysterious system of projecting lights and turning gears. The viewer pedals more vigorously, the gears rotate more quickly, and the horse of light breaks into a gallop. Sitting in the saddle, the viewer creates a shadow that lines up with the horse, casting himself as a jockey in the projected world, galloping through the empty pastures of a fictitious world at an exhilarating pace.

Eadweard Muybridge was hired by Leland Stanford to answer the question if a horse had all four legs in the air at any time at a full gallop. In 1878 he had already proved this with a single photograph the following year he devised a more elaborate setup with twenty-four cameras setup over a twenty foot length triggered by the horse’s hoofs as it galloped past. The resulting photographs were widely published (and later the basis for a book by Stanford) and a popular culture sensation.

A585ECBA-02D2-4601-87C1-990CD7B04A3D.jpg

Realizing that he was onto something, eczema Eadweard invented the Zoopraxiscope which projected images from a rotating glass disk to give the impression of motion – creating the first movie projector.

In 2008 Mitchell f Chan and Brad Hindson created A Dream of Pastures funded by Ontario Arts Council to be exhibited on the exterior of the Art Gallery of Ontario for Toronto’s Nuit Blanche All-Night contemporary art festival.


mycoplasmosis 0,40,0″>


Mitchell says:

A Dream of Pastures is an interactive outdoor sculpture and animated light projection. On the exterior wall of the Art Gallery of Ontario, the ghostly form of a horse glows on the shadowy brick. On the ground several meters in front of it, a stationary bicycle beckons for investigation from the viewer.

As the viewer pedals the bicycle, he discovers that the phantom horse moves accordingly, animated by a mysterious system of projecting lights and turning gears. The viewer pedals more vigorously, the gears rotate more quickly, and the horse of light breaks into a gallop. Sitting in the saddle, the viewer creates a shadow that lines up with the horse, casting himself as a jockey in the projected world, galloping through the empty pastures of a fictitious world at an exhilarating pace.

It’s not clear to me if the connection is intentional or coincidence, but I’d like to think it’s a modern interactive interpretation of an important historical moment.

More information here

In 1878 Eadweard Muybridge was hired by Leland Stanford to answer the question if a horse had all four legs in the air at any time at a full gallop. Although he had already proved the point with a single photograph the following year he devised a more elaborate setup with twenty-four cameras setup over a twenty foot length triggered by the horse’s hoofs as it galloped past. The resulting photographs were widely published (and later the basis for a book by Stanford) and a sensation.

A585ECBA-02D2-4601-87C1-990CD7B04A3D.jpg

Realizing that he was onto something, check Eadweard invented the Zoopraxiscope which projected images from a rotating glass disk to give the impression of motion – creating the first movie projector.

In 2008 Mitchell f Chan and Brad Hindson created A Dream of Pastures for the Ontario Arts Council.

A Dream of Pastures is an interactive outdoor sculpture and animated light projection. On the exterior wall of the Art Gallery of Ontario, the ghostly form of a horse glows on the shadowy brick. On the ground several meters in front of it, a stationary bicycle beckons for investigation from the viewer.

As the viewer pedals the bicycle, he discovers that the phantom horse moves accordingly, animated by a mysterious system of projecting lights and turning gears. The viewer pedals more vigorously, the gears rotate more quickly, and the horse of light breaks into a gallop. Sitting in the saddle, the viewer creates a shadow that lines up with the horse, casting himself as a jockey in the projected world, galloping through the empty pastures of a fictitious world at an exhilarating pace.

Eadweard Muybridge was hired by Leland Stanford to answer the question if a horse had all four legs in the air at any time at a full gallop. Although in 1878 he had already proved this with a single photograph the following year he devised a more elaborate setup with twenty-four cameras setup over a twenty foot length triggered by the horse’s hoofs as it galloped past. The resulting photographs were widely published (and later the basis for a book by Stanford) and a popular culture sensation.

A585ECBA-02D2-4601-87C1-990CD7B04A3D.jpg

Realizing that he was onto something, here Eadweard invented the Zoopraxiscope which projected images from a rotating glass disk to give the impression of motion – creating the first movie projector.

In 2008 Mitchell f Chan and Brad Hindson created A Dream of Pastures funded by Ontario Arts Council to be exhibited on the exterior of the Art Gallery of Ontario for Toronto’s Nuit Blanche All-Night contemporary art festival.


view 0,40,0″>


Mitchell says:

A Dream of Pastures is an interactive outdoor sculpture and animated light projection. On the exterior wall of the Art Gallery of Ontario, the ghostly form of a horse glows on the shadowy brick. On the ground several meters in front of it, a stationary bicycle beckons for investigation from the viewer.

As the viewer pedals the bicycle, he discovers that the phantom horse moves accordingly, animated by a mysterious system of projecting lights and turning gears. The viewer pedals more vigorously, the gears rotate more quickly, and the horse of light breaks into a gallop. Sitting in the saddle, the viewer creates a shadow that lines up with the horse, casting himself as a jockey in the projected world, galloping through the empty pastures of a fictitious world at an exhilarating pace.

It’s not clear to me if the connection is intentional or coincidence, but I’d like to think it’s a modern interactive interpretation of an important historical moment.

More information here

In 1878 Eadweard Muybridge was hired by Leland Stanford to answer the question if a horse had all four legs in the air at any time at a full gallop. Although he had already proved the point with a single photograph the following year he devised a more elaborate setup with twenty-four cameras setup over a twenty foot length triggered by the horse’s hoofs as it galloped past. The resulting photographs were widely published (and later the basis for a book by Stanford) and a sensation.

A585ECBA-02D2-4601-87C1-990CD7B04A3D.jpg

Realizing that he was onto something, cystitis Eadweard invented the Zoopraxiscope which projected images from a rotating glass disk to give the impression of motion – creating the first movie projector.

In 2008 Mitchell f Chan and Brad Hindson created A Dream of Pastures for the Ontario Arts Council.




A Dream of Pastures is an interactive outdoor sculpture and animated light projection. On the exterior wall of the Art Gallery of Ontario, pharm the ghostly form of a horse glows on the shadowy brick. On the ground several meters in front of it, a stationary bicycle beckons for investigation from the viewer.

As the viewer pedals the bicycle, he discovers that the phantom horse moves accordingly, animated by a mysterious system of projecting lights and turning gears. The viewer pedals more vigorously, the gears rotate more quickly, and the horse of light breaks into a gallop. Sitting in the saddle, the viewer creates a shadow that lines up with the horse, casting himself as a jockey in the projected world, galloping through the empty pastures of a fictitious world at an exhilarating pace.

In 1878 Eadweard Muybridge was hired by Leland Stanford to answer the question if a horse had all four legs in the air at any time at a full gallop. Although he had already proved the point with a single photograph the following year he devised a more elaborate setup with twenty-four cameras setup over a twenty foot length triggered by the horse’s hoofs as it galloped past. The resulting photographs were widely published (and later the basis for a book by Stanford) and a sensation.

A585ECBA-02D2-4601-87C1-990CD7B04A3D.jpg

Realizing that he was onto something, sick Eadweard invented the Zoopraxiscope which projected images from a rotating glass disk to give the impression of motion – creating the first movie projector.

In 2008 Mitchell f Chan and Brad Hindson created A Dream of Pastures for the Ontario Arts Council.




A Dream of Pastures is an interactive outdoor sculpture and animated light projection. On the exterior wall of the Art Gallery of Ontario, treatment the ghostly form of a horse glows on the shadowy brick. On the ground several meters in front of it, information pills a stationary bicycle beckons for investigation from the viewer.

As the viewer pedals the bicycle, he discovers that the phantom horse moves accordingly, animated by a mysterious system of projecting lights and turning gears. The viewer pedals more vigorously, the gears rotate more quickly, and the horse of light breaks into a gallop. Sitting in the saddle, the viewer creates a shadow that lines up with the horse, casting himself as a jockey in the projected world, galloping through the empty pastures of a fictitious world at an exhilarating pace.

Eadweard Muybridge was hired by Leland Stanford to answer the question if a horse had all four legs in the air at any time at a full gallop. In 1878 he had already proved this with a single photograph the following year he devised a more elaborate setup with twenty-four cameras setup over a twenty foot length triggered by the horse’s hoofs as it galloped past. The resulting photographs were widely published (and later the basis for a book by Stanford) and a popular culture sensation.

A585ECBA-02D2-4601-87C1-990CD7B04A3D.jpg

Realizing that he was onto something, eczema Eadweard invented the Zoopraxiscope which projected images from a rotating glass disk to give the impression of motion – creating the first movie projector.

In 2008 Mitchell f Chan and Brad Hindson created A Dream of Pastures funded by Ontario Arts Council to be exhibited on the exterior of the Art Gallery of Ontario for Toronto’s Nuit Blanche All-Night contemporary art festival.


mycoplasmosis 0,40,0″>


Mitchell says:

A Dream of Pastures is an interactive outdoor sculpture and animated light projection. On the exterior wall of the Art Gallery of Ontario, the ghostly form of a horse glows on the shadowy brick. On the ground several meters in front of it, a stationary bicycle beckons for investigation from the viewer.

As the viewer pedals the bicycle, he discovers that the phantom horse moves accordingly, animated by a mysterious system of projecting lights and turning gears. The viewer pedals more vigorously, the gears rotate more quickly, and the horse of light breaks into a gallop. Sitting in the saddle, the viewer creates a shadow that lines up with the horse, casting himself as a jockey in the projected world, galloping through the empty pastures of a fictitious world at an exhilarating pace.

It’s not clear to me if the connection is intentional or coincidence, but I’d like to think it’s a modern interactive interpretation of an important historical moment.

More information here

In 1878 Eadweard Muybridge was hired by Leland Stanford to answer the question if a horse had all four legs in the air at any time at a full gallop. Although he had already proved the point with a single photograph the following year he devised a more elaborate setup with twenty-four cameras setup over a twenty foot length triggered by the horse’s hoofs as it galloped past. The resulting photographs were widely published (and later the basis for a book by Stanford) and a sensation.

A585ECBA-02D2-4601-87C1-990CD7B04A3D.jpg

Realizing that he was onto something, check Eadweard invented the Zoopraxiscope which projected images from a rotating glass disk to give the impression of motion – creating the first movie projector.

In 2008 Mitchell f Chan and Brad Hindson created A Dream of Pastures for the Ontario Arts Council.

A Dream of Pastures is an interactive outdoor sculpture and animated light projection. On the exterior wall of the Art Gallery of Ontario, the ghostly form of a horse glows on the shadowy brick. On the ground several meters in front of it, a stationary bicycle beckons for investigation from the viewer.

As the viewer pedals the bicycle, he discovers that the phantom horse moves accordingly, animated by a mysterious system of projecting lights and turning gears. The viewer pedals more vigorously, the gears rotate more quickly, and the horse of light breaks into a gallop. Sitting in the saddle, the viewer creates a shadow that lines up with the horse, casting himself as a jockey in the projected world, galloping through the empty pastures of a fictitious world at an exhilarating pace.

In 1878 Eadweard Muybridge was hired by Leland Stanford to answer the question if a horse had all four legs in the air at any time at a full gallop. Although he had already proved the point with a single photograph the following year he devised a more elaborate setup with twenty-four cameras setup over a twenty foot length triggered by the horse’s hoofs as it galloped past. The resulting photographs were widely published (and later the basis for a book by Stanford) and a sensation.

A585ECBA-02D2-4601-87C1-990CD7B04A3D.jpg

Realizing that he was onto something, cystitis Eadweard invented the Zoopraxiscope which projected images from a rotating glass disk to give the impression of motion – creating the first movie projector.

In 2008 Mitchell f Chan and Brad Hindson created A Dream of Pastures for the Ontario Arts Council.


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A Dream of Pastures is an interactive outdoor sculpture and animated light projection. On the exterior wall of the Art Gallery of Ontario, the ghostly form of a horse glows on the shadowy brick. On the ground several meters in front of it, a stationary bicycle beckons for investigation from the viewer.

As the viewer pedals the bicycle, he discovers that the phantom horse moves accordingly, animated by a mysterious system of projecting lights and turning gears. The viewer pedals more vigorously, the gears rotate more quickly, and the horse of light breaks into a gallop. Sitting in the saddle, the viewer creates a shadow that lines up with the horse, casting himself as a jockey in the projected world, galloping through the empty pastures of a fictitious world at an exhilarating pace.

Eadweard Muybridge was hired by Leland Stanford to answer the question if a horse had all four legs in the air at any time at a full gallop. Although in 1878 he had already proved this with a single photograph the following year he devised a more elaborate setup with twenty-four cameras setup over a twenty foot length triggered by the horse’s hoofs as it galloped past. The resulting photographs were widely published (and later the basis for a book by Stanford) and a popular culture sensation.

A585ECBA-02D2-4601-87C1-990CD7B04A3D.jpg

Realizing that he was onto something, here Eadweard invented the Zoopraxiscope which projected images from a rotating glass disk to give the impression of motion – creating the first movie projector.

In 2008 Mitchell f Chan and Brad Hindson created A Dream of Pastures funded by Ontario Arts Council to be exhibited on the exterior of the Art Gallery of Ontario for Toronto’s Nuit Blanche All-Night contemporary art festival.


view 0,40,0″>


Mitchell says:

A Dream of Pastures is an interactive outdoor sculpture and animated light projection. On the exterior wall of the Art Gallery of Ontario, the ghostly form of a horse glows on the shadowy brick. On the ground several meters in front of it, a stationary bicycle beckons for investigation from the viewer.

As the viewer pedals the bicycle, he discovers that the phantom horse moves accordingly, animated by a mysterious system of projecting lights and turning gears. The viewer pedals more vigorously, the gears rotate more quickly, and the horse of light breaks into a gallop. Sitting in the saddle, the viewer creates a shadow that lines up with the horse, casting himself as a jockey in the projected world, galloping through the empty pastures of a fictitious world at an exhilarating pace.

It’s not clear to me if the connection is intentional or coincidence, but I’d like to think it’s a modern interactive interpretation of an important historical moment.

More information here

In 1878 Eadweard Muybridge was hired by Leland Stanford to answer the question if a horse had all four legs in the air at any time at a full gallop. Although he had already proved the point with a single photograph the following year he devised a more elaborate setup with twenty-four cameras setup over a twenty foot length triggered by the horse’s hoofs as it galloped past. The resulting photographs were widely published (and later the basis for a book by Stanford) and a sensation.

A585ECBA-02D2-4601-87C1-990CD7B04A3D.jpg

Realizing that he was onto something, cystitis Eadweard invented the Zoopraxiscope which projected images from a rotating glass disk to give the impression of motion – creating the first movie projector.

In 2008 Mitchell f Chan and Brad Hindson created A Dream of Pastures for the Ontario Arts Council.




A Dream of Pastures is an interactive outdoor sculpture and animated light projection. On the exterior wall of the Art Gallery of Ontario, pharm the ghostly form of a horse glows on the shadowy brick. On the ground several meters in front of it, a stationary bicycle beckons for investigation from the viewer.

As the viewer pedals the bicycle, he discovers that the phantom horse moves accordingly, animated by a mysterious system of projecting lights and turning gears. The viewer pedals more vigorously, the gears rotate more quickly, and the horse of light breaks into a gallop. Sitting in the saddle, the viewer creates a shadow that lines up with the horse, casting himself as a jockey in the projected world, galloping through the empty pastures of a fictitious world at an exhilarating pace.

In 1878 Eadweard Muybridge was hired by Leland Stanford to answer the question if a horse had all four legs in the air at any time at a full gallop. Although he had already proved the point with a single photograph the following year he devised a more elaborate setup with twenty-four cameras setup over a twenty foot length triggered by the horse’s hoofs as it galloped past. The resulting photographs were widely published (and later the basis for a book by Stanford) and a sensation.

A585ECBA-02D2-4601-87C1-990CD7B04A3D.jpg

Realizing that he was onto something, sick Eadweard invented the Zoopraxiscope which projected images from a rotating glass disk to give the impression of motion – creating the first movie projector.

In 2008 Mitchell f Chan and Brad Hindson created A Dream of Pastures for the Ontario Arts Council.




A Dream of Pastures is an interactive outdoor sculpture and animated light projection. On the exterior wall of the Art Gallery of Ontario, treatment the ghostly form of a horse glows on the shadowy brick. On the ground several meters in front of it, information pills a stationary bicycle beckons for investigation from the viewer.

As the viewer pedals the bicycle, he discovers that the phantom horse moves accordingly, animated by a mysterious system of projecting lights and turning gears. The viewer pedals more vigorously, the gears rotate more quickly, and the horse of light breaks into a gallop. Sitting in the saddle, the viewer creates a shadow that lines up with the horse, casting himself as a jockey in the projected world, galloping through the empty pastures of a fictitious world at an exhilarating pace.

Eadweard Muybridge was hired by Leland Stanford to answer the question if a horse had all four legs in the air at any time at a full gallop. In 1878 he had already proved this with a single photograph the following year he devised a more elaborate setup with twenty-four cameras setup over a twenty foot length triggered by the horse’s hoofs as it galloped past. The resulting photographs were widely published (and later the basis for a book by Stanford) and a popular culture sensation.

A585ECBA-02D2-4601-87C1-990CD7B04A3D.jpg

Realizing that he was onto something, eczema Eadweard invented the Zoopraxiscope which projected images from a rotating glass disk to give the impression of motion – creating the first movie projector.

In 2008 Mitchell f Chan and Brad Hindson created A Dream of Pastures funded by Ontario Arts Council to be exhibited on the exterior of the Art Gallery of Ontario for Toronto’s Nuit Blanche All-Night contemporary art festival.


mycoplasmosis 0,40,0″>


Mitchell says:

A Dream of Pastures is an interactive outdoor sculpture and animated light projection. On the exterior wall of the Art Gallery of Ontario, the ghostly form of a horse glows on the shadowy brick. On the ground several meters in front of it, a stationary bicycle beckons for investigation from the viewer.

As the viewer pedals the bicycle, he discovers that the phantom horse moves accordingly, animated by a mysterious system of projecting lights and turning gears. The viewer pedals more vigorously, the gears rotate more quickly, and the horse of light breaks into a gallop. Sitting in the saddle, the viewer creates a shadow that lines up with the horse, casting himself as a jockey in the projected world, galloping through the empty pastures of a fictitious world at an exhilarating pace.

It’s not clear to me if the connection is intentional or coincidence, but I’d like to think it’s a modern interactive interpretation of an important historical moment.

More information here

In 1878 Eadweard Muybridge was hired by Leland Stanford to answer the question if a horse had all four legs in the air at any time at a full gallop. Although he had already proved the point with a single photograph the following year he devised a more elaborate setup with twenty-four cameras setup over a twenty foot length triggered by the horse’s hoofs as it galloped past. The resulting photographs were widely published (and later the basis for a book by Stanford) and a sensation.

A585ECBA-02D2-4601-87C1-990CD7B04A3D.jpg

Realizing that he was onto something, check Eadweard invented the Zoopraxiscope which projected images from a rotating glass disk to give the impression of motion – creating the first movie projector.

In 2008 Mitchell f Chan and Brad Hindson created A Dream of Pastures for the Ontario Arts Council.

A Dream of Pastures is an interactive outdoor sculpture and animated light projection. On the exterior wall of the Art Gallery of Ontario, the ghostly form of a horse glows on the shadowy brick. On the ground several meters in front of it, a stationary bicycle beckons for investigation from the viewer.

As the viewer pedals the bicycle, he discovers that the phantom horse moves accordingly, animated by a mysterious system of projecting lights and turning gears. The viewer pedals more vigorously, the gears rotate more quickly, and the horse of light breaks into a gallop. Sitting in the saddle, the viewer creates a shadow that lines up with the horse, casting himself as a jockey in the projected world, galloping through the empty pastures of a fictitious world at an exhilarating pace.

In 1878 Eadweard Muybridge was hired by Leland Stanford to answer the question if a horse had all four legs in the air at any time at a full gallop. Although he had already proved the point with a single photograph the following year he devised a more elaborate setup with twenty-four cameras setup over a twenty foot length triggered by the horse’s hoofs as it galloped past. The resulting photographs were widely published (and later the basis for a book by Stanford) and a sensation.

A585ECBA-02D2-4601-87C1-990CD7B04A3D.jpg

Realizing that he was onto something, cystitis Eadweard invented the Zoopraxiscope which projected images from a rotating glass disk to give the impression of motion – creating the first movie projector.

In 2008 Mitchell f Chan and Brad Hindson created A Dream of Pastures for the Ontario Arts Council.


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A Dream of Pastures is an interactive outdoor sculpture and animated light projection. On the exterior wall of the Art Gallery of Ontario, the ghostly form of a horse glows on the shadowy brick. On the ground several meters in front of it, a stationary bicycle beckons for investigation from the viewer.

As the viewer pedals the bicycle, he discovers that the phantom horse moves accordingly, animated by a mysterious system of projecting lights and turning gears. The viewer pedals more vigorously, the gears rotate more quickly, and the horse of light breaks into a gallop. Sitting in the saddle, the viewer creates a shadow that lines up with the horse, casting himself as a jockey in the projected world, galloping through the empty pastures of a fictitious world at an exhilarating pace.

In 1878 Eadweard Muybridge was hired by Leland Stanford to answer the question if a horse had all four legs in the air at any time at a full gallop. Although he had already proved the point with a single photograph the following year he devised amore elaborate setup with twenty-four cameras setup over a twenty foot length triggered by the horse’s hoofs as it galloped past. The resulting photographs were widely published (and later the basis for a book by Stanford) and a sensation.

A585ECBA-02D2-4601-87C1-990CD7B04A3D.jpg

Realizing that he was onto something, troche Eadweard invented the Zoopraxiscope which projected images from a rotating glass disk to give the impression of motion – creating the first movie projector.

In 2008 Mitchell f Chan and Brad Hindson created A Dream of Pastures for the Ontario Arts Council.


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Mitchell says:

A Dream of Pastures is an interactive outdoor sculpture and animated light projection. On the exterior wall of the Art Gallery of Ontario, the ghostly form of a horse glows on the shadowy brick. On the ground several meters in front of it, a stationary bicycle beckons for investigation from the viewer.

As the viewer pedals the bicycle, he discovers that the phantom horse moves accordingly, animated by a mysterious system of projecting lights and turning gears. The viewer pedals more vigorously, the gears rotate more quickly, and the horse of light breaks into a gallop. Sitting in the saddle, the viewer creates a shadow that lines up with the horse, casting himself as a jockey in the projected world, galloping through the empty pastures of a fictitious world at an exhilarating pace.

Eadweard Muybridge was hired by Leland Stanford to answer the question if a horse had all four legs in the air at any time at a full gallop. Although in 1878 he had already proved this with a single photograph the following year he devised a more elaborate setup with twenty-four cameras setup over a twenty foot length triggered by the horse’s hoofs as it galloped past. The resulting photographs were widely published (and later the basis for a book by Stanford) and a popular culture sensation.

A585ECBA-02D2-4601-87C1-990CD7B04A3D.jpg

Realizing that he was onto something, here Eadweard invented the Zoopraxiscope which projected images from a rotating glass disk to give the impression of motion – creating the first movie projector.

In 2008 Mitchell f Chan and Brad Hindson created A Dream of Pastures funded by Ontario Arts Council to be exhibited on the exterior of the Art Gallery of Ontario for Toronto’s Nuit Blanche All-Night contemporary art festival.


view 0,40,0″>


Mitchell says:

A Dream of Pastures is an interactive outdoor sculpture and animated light projection. On the exterior wall of the Art Gallery of Ontario, the ghostly form of a horse glows on the shadowy brick. On the ground several meters in front of it, a stationary bicycle beckons for investigation from the viewer.

As the viewer pedals the bicycle, he discovers that the phantom horse moves accordingly, animated by a mysterious system of projecting lights and turning gears. The viewer pedals more vigorously, the gears rotate more quickly, and the horse of light breaks into a gallop. Sitting in the saddle, the viewer creates a shadow that lines up with the horse, casting himself as a jockey in the projected world, galloping through the empty pastures of a fictitious world at an exhilarating pace.

It’s not clear to me if the connection is intentional or coincidence, but I’d like to think it’s a modern interactive interpretation of an important historical moment.

More information here

In 1878 Eadweard Muybridge was hired by Leland Stanford to answer the question if a horse had all four legs in the air at any time at a full gallop. Although he had already proved the point with a single photograph the following year he devised a more elaborate setup with twenty-four cameras setup over a twenty foot length triggered by the horse’s hoofs as it galloped past. The resulting photographs were widely published (and later the basis for a book by Stanford) and a sensation.

A585ECBA-02D2-4601-87C1-990CD7B04A3D.jpg

Realizing that he was onto something, cystitis Eadweard invented the Zoopraxiscope which projected images from a rotating glass disk to give the impression of motion – creating the first movie projector.

In 2008 Mitchell f Chan and Brad Hindson created A Dream of Pastures for the Ontario Arts Council.




A Dream of Pastures is an interactive outdoor sculpture and animated light projection. On the exterior wall of the Art Gallery of Ontario, pharm the ghostly form of a horse glows on the shadowy brick. On the ground several meters in front of it, a stationary bicycle beckons for investigation from the viewer.

As the viewer pedals the bicycle, he discovers that the phantom horse moves accordingly, animated by a mysterious system of projecting lights and turning gears. The viewer pedals more vigorously, the gears rotate more quickly, and the horse of light breaks into a gallop. Sitting in the saddle, the viewer creates a shadow that lines up with the horse, casting himself as a jockey in the projected world, galloping through the empty pastures of a fictitious world at an exhilarating pace.

In 1878 Eadweard Muybridge was hired by Leland Stanford to answer the question if a horse had all four legs in the air at any time at a full gallop. Although he had already proved the point with a single photograph the following year he devised a more elaborate setup with twenty-four cameras setup over a twenty foot length triggered by the horse’s hoofs as it galloped past. The resulting photographs were widely published (and later the basis for a book by Stanford) and a sensation.

A585ECBA-02D2-4601-87C1-990CD7B04A3D.jpg

Realizing that he was onto something, sick Eadweard invented the Zoopraxiscope which projected images from a rotating glass disk to give the impression of motion – creating the first movie projector.

In 2008 Mitchell f Chan and Brad Hindson created A Dream of Pastures for the Ontario Arts Council.




A Dream of Pastures is an interactive outdoor sculpture and animated light projection. On the exterior wall of the Art Gallery of Ontario, treatment the ghostly form of a horse glows on the shadowy brick. On the ground several meters in front of it, information pills a stationary bicycle beckons for investigation from the viewer.

As the viewer pedals the bicycle, he discovers that the phantom horse moves accordingly, animated by a mysterious system of projecting lights and turning gears. The viewer pedals more vigorously, the gears rotate more quickly, and the horse of light breaks into a gallop. Sitting in the saddle, the viewer creates a shadow that lines up with the horse, casting himself as a jockey in the projected world, galloping through the empty pastures of a fictitious world at an exhilarating pace.

Eadweard Muybridge was hired by Leland Stanford to answer the question if a horse had all four legs in the air at any time at a full gallop. In 1878 he had already proved this with a single photograph the following year he devised a more elaborate setup with twenty-four cameras setup over a twenty foot length triggered by the horse’s hoofs as it galloped past. The resulting photographs were widely published (and later the basis for a book by Stanford) and a popular culture sensation.

A585ECBA-02D2-4601-87C1-990CD7B04A3D.jpg

Realizing that he was onto something, eczema Eadweard invented the Zoopraxiscope which projected images from a rotating glass disk to give the impression of motion – creating the first movie projector.

In 2008 Mitchell f Chan and Brad Hindson created A Dream of Pastures funded by Ontario Arts Council to be exhibited on the exterior of the Art Gallery of Ontario for Toronto’s Nuit Blanche All-Night contemporary art festival.


mycoplasmosis 0,40,0″>


Mitchell says:

A Dream of Pastures is an interactive outdoor sculpture and animated light projection. On the exterior wall of the Art Gallery of Ontario, the ghostly form of a horse glows on the shadowy brick. On the ground several meters in front of it, a stationary bicycle beckons for investigation from the viewer.

As the viewer pedals the bicycle, he discovers that the phantom horse moves accordingly, animated by a mysterious system of projecting lights and turning gears. The viewer pedals more vigorously, the gears rotate more quickly, and the horse of light breaks into a gallop. Sitting in the saddle, the viewer creates a shadow that lines up with the horse, casting himself as a jockey in the projected world, galloping through the empty pastures of a fictitious world at an exhilarating pace.

It’s not clear to me if the connection is intentional or coincidence, but I’d like to think it’s a modern interactive interpretation of an important historical moment.

More information here

In 1878 Eadweard Muybridge was hired by Leland Stanford to answer the question if a horse had all four legs in the air at any time at a full gallop. Although he had already proved the point with a single photograph the following year he devised a more elaborate setup with twenty-four cameras setup over a twenty foot length triggered by the horse’s hoofs as it galloped past. The resulting photographs were widely published (and later the basis for a book by Stanford) and a sensation.

A585ECBA-02D2-4601-87C1-990CD7B04A3D.jpg

Realizing that he was onto something, check Eadweard invented the Zoopraxiscope which projected images from a rotating glass disk to give the impression of motion – creating the first movie projector.

In 2008 Mitchell f Chan and Brad Hindson created A Dream of Pastures for the Ontario Arts Council.

A Dream of Pastures is an interactive outdoor sculpture and animated light projection. On the exterior wall of the Art Gallery of Ontario, the ghostly form of a horse glows on the shadowy brick. On the ground several meters in front of it, a stationary bicycle beckons for investigation from the viewer.

As the viewer pedals the bicycle, he discovers that the phantom horse moves accordingly, animated by a mysterious system of projecting lights and turning gears. The viewer pedals more vigorously, the gears rotate more quickly, and the horse of light breaks into a gallop. Sitting in the saddle, the viewer creates a shadow that lines up with the horse, casting himself as a jockey in the projected world, galloping through the empty pastures of a fictitious world at an exhilarating pace.

In 1878 Eadweard Muybridge was hired by Leland Stanford to answer the question if a horse had all four legs in the air at any time at a full gallop. Although he had already proved the point with a single photograph the following year he devised a more elaborate setup with twenty-four cameras setup over a twenty foot length triggered by the horse’s hoofs as it galloped past. The resulting photographs were widely published (and later the basis for a book by Stanford) and a sensation.

A585ECBA-02D2-4601-87C1-990CD7B04A3D.jpg

Realizing that he was onto something, cystitis Eadweard invented the Zoopraxiscope which projected images from a rotating glass disk to give the impression of motion – creating the first movie projector.

In 2008 Mitchell f Chan and Brad Hindson created A Dream of Pastures for the Ontario Arts Council.


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A Dream of Pastures is an interactive outdoor sculpture and animated light projection. On the exterior wall of the Art Gallery of Ontario, the ghostly form of a horse glows on the shadowy brick. On the ground several meters in front of it, a stationary bicycle beckons for investigation from the viewer.

As the viewer pedals the bicycle, he discovers that the phantom horse moves accordingly, animated by a mysterious system of projecting lights and turning gears. The viewer pedals more vigorously, the gears rotate more quickly, and the horse of light breaks into a gallop. Sitting in the saddle, the viewer creates a shadow that lines up with the horse, casting himself as a jockey in the projected world, galloping through the empty pastures of a fictitious world at an exhilarating pace.

In 1878 Eadweard Muybridge was hired by Leland Stanford to answer the question if a horse had all four legs in the air at any time at a full gallop. Although he had already proved the point with a single photograph the following year he devised amore elaborate setup with twenty-four cameras setup over a twenty foot length triggered by the horse’s hoofs as it galloped past. The resulting photographs were widely published (and later the basis for a book by Stanford) and a sensation.

A585ECBA-02D2-4601-87C1-990CD7B04A3D.jpg

Realizing that he was onto something, troche Eadweard invented the Zoopraxiscope which projected images from a rotating glass disk to give the impression of motion – creating the first movie projector.

In 2008 Mitchell f Chan and Brad Hindson created A Dream of Pastures for the Ontario Arts Council.


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Mitchell says:

A Dream of Pastures is an interactive outdoor sculpture and animated light projection. On the exterior wall of the Art Gallery of Ontario, the ghostly form of a horse glows on the shadowy brick. On the ground several meters in front of it, a stationary bicycle beckons for investigation from the viewer.

As the viewer pedals the bicycle, he discovers that the phantom horse moves accordingly, animated by a mysterious system of projecting lights and turning gears. The viewer pedals more vigorously, the gears rotate more quickly, and the horse of light breaks into a gallop. Sitting in the saddle, the viewer creates a shadow that lines up with the horse, casting himself as a jockey in the projected world, galloping through the empty pastures of a fictitious world at an exhilarating pace.

In 1878 Eadweard Muybridge was hired by Leland Stanford to answer the question if a horse had all four legs in the air at any time at a full gallop. Although he had already proved the point with a single photograph the following year he devised a more elaborate setup with twenty-four cameras setup over a twenty foot length triggered by the horse’s hoofs as it galloped past. The resulting photographs were widely published (and later the basis for a book by Stanford) and a sensation.

A585ECBA-02D2-4601-87C1-990CD7B04A3D.jpg

Realizing that he was onto something, find Eadweard invented the Zoopraxiscope which projected images from a rotating glass disk to give the impression of motion – creating the first movie projector.

In 2008 Mitchell f Chan and Brad Hindson created A Dream of Pastures for the Ontario Arts Council.


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Mitchell says:

A Dream of Pastures is an interactive outdoor sculpture and animated light projection. On the exterior wall of the Art Gallery of Ontario, the ghostly form of a horse glows on the shadowy brick. On the ground several meters in front of it, a stationary bicycle beckons for investigation from the viewer.

As the viewer pedals the bicycle, he discovers that the phantom horse moves accordingly, animated by a mysterious system of projecting lights and turning gears. The viewer pedals more vigorously, the gears rotate more quickly, and the horse of light breaks into a gallop. Sitting in the saddle, the viewer creates a shadow that lines up with the horse, casting himself as a jockey in the projected world, galloping through the empty pastures of a fictitious world at an exhilarating pace.

Eadweard Muybridge was hired by Leland Stanford to answer the question if a horse had all four legs in the air at any time at a full gallop. Although in 1878 he had already proved this with a single photograph the following year he devised a more elaborate setup with twenty-four cameras setup over a twenty foot length triggered by the horse’s hoofs as it galloped past. The resulting photographs were widely published (and later the basis for a book by Stanford) and a popular culture sensation.

A585ECBA-02D2-4601-87C1-990CD7B04A3D.jpg

Realizing that he was onto something, here Eadweard invented the Zoopraxiscope which projected images from a rotating glass disk to give the impression of motion – creating the first movie projector.

In 2008 Mitchell f Chan and Brad Hindson created A Dream of Pastures funded by Ontario Arts Council to be exhibited on the exterior of the Art Gallery of Ontario for Toronto’s Nuit Blanche All-Night contemporary art festival.


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Mitchell says:

A Dream of Pastures is an interactive outdoor sculpture and animated light projection. On the exterior wall of the Art Gallery of Ontario, the ghostly form of a horse glows on the shadowy brick. On the ground several meters in front of it, a stationary bicycle beckons for investigation from the viewer.

As the viewer pedals the bicycle, he discovers that the phantom horse moves accordingly, animated by a mysterious system of projecting lights and turning gears. The viewer pedals more vigorously, the gears rotate more quickly, and the horse of light breaks into a gallop. Sitting in the saddle, the viewer creates a shadow that lines up with the horse, casting himself as a jockey in the projected world, galloping through the empty pastures of a fictitious world at an exhilarating pace.

It’s not clear to me if the connection is intentional or coincidence, but I’d like to think it’s a modern interactive interpretation of an important historical moment.

More information here

Eadweard Muybridge was hired by Leland Stanford to answer the question if a horse had all four legs in the air at any time at a full gallop. Although in 1878 he had already proved this with a single photograph the following year he devised a more elaborate setup with twenty-four cameras setup over a twenty foot length triggered by the horse’s hoofs as it galloped past. The resulting photographs were widely published (and later the basis for a book by Stanford) and a popular culture sensation.

A585ECBA-02D2-4601-87C1-990CD7B04A3D.jpg

Realizing that he was onto something, here Eadweard invented the Zoopraxiscope which projected images from a rotating glass disk to give the impression of motion – creating the first movie projector.

In 2008 Mitchell f Chan and Brad Hindson created A Dream of Pastures funded by Ontario Arts Council to be exhibited on the exterior of the Art Gallery of Ontario for Toronto’s Nuit Blanche All-Night contemporary art festival.


view 0,40,0″>


Mitchell says:

A Dream of Pastures is an interactive outdoor sculpture and animated light projection. On the exterior wall of the Art Gallery of Ontario, the ghostly form of a horse glows on the shadowy brick. On the ground several meters in front of it, a stationary bicycle beckons for investigation from the viewer.

As the viewer pedals the bicycle, he discovers that the phantom horse moves accordingly, animated by a mysterious system of projecting lights and turning gears. The viewer pedals more vigorously, the gears rotate more quickly, and the horse of light breaks into a gallop. Sitting in the saddle, the viewer creates a shadow that lines up with the horse, casting himself as a jockey in the projected world, galloping through the empty pastures of a fictitious world at an exhilarating pace.

It’s not clear to me if the connection is intentional or coincidence, but I’d like to think it’s a modern interactive interpretation of an important historical moment.

More information here

In 1878 Eadweard Muybridge was hired by Leland Stanford to answer the question if a horse had all four legs in the air at any time at a full gallop. Although he had already proved the point with a single photograph the following year he devised a more elaborate setup with twenty-four cameras setup over a twenty foot length triggered by the horse’s hoofs as it galloped past. The resulting photographs were widely published (and later the basis for a book by Stanford) and a sensation.

A585ECBA-02D2-4601-87C1-990CD7B04A3D.jpg

Realizing that he was onto something, cystitis Eadweard invented the Zoopraxiscope which projected images from a rotating glass disk to give the impression of motion – creating the first movie projector.

In 2008 Mitchell f Chan and Brad Hindson created A Dream of Pastures for the Ontario Arts Council.




A Dream of Pastures is an interactive outdoor sculpture and animated light projection. On the exterior wall of the Art Gallery of Ontario, pharm the ghostly form of a horse glows on the shadowy brick. On the ground several meters in front of it, a stationary bicycle beckons for investigation from the viewer.

As the viewer pedals the bicycle, he discovers that the phantom horse moves accordingly, animated by a mysterious system of projecting lights and turning gears. The viewer pedals more vigorously, the gears rotate more quickly, and the horse of light breaks into a gallop. Sitting in the saddle, the viewer creates a shadow that lines up with the horse, casting himself as a jockey in the projected world, galloping through the empty pastures of a fictitious world at an exhilarating pace.

Eadweard Muybridge was hired by Leland Stanford to answer the question if a horse had all four legs in the air at any time at a full gallop. Although in 1878 he had already proved this with a single photograph the following year he devised a more elaborate setup with twenty-four cameras setup over a twenty foot length triggered by the horse’s hoofs as it galloped past. The resulting photographs were widely published (and later the basis for a book by Stanford) and a popular culture sensation.

A585ECBA-02D2-4601-87C1-990CD7B04A3D.jpg

Realizing that he was onto something, here Eadweard invented the Zoopraxiscope which projected images from a rotating glass disk to give the impression of motion – creating the first movie projector.

In 2008 Mitchell f Chan and Brad Hindson created A Dream of Pastures funded by Ontario Arts Council to be exhibited on the exterior of the Art Gallery of Ontario for Toronto’s Nuit Blanche All-Night contemporary art festival.


view 0,40,0″>


Mitchell says:

A Dream of Pastures is an interactive outdoor sculpture and animated light projection. On the exterior wall of the Art Gallery of Ontario, the ghostly form of a horse glows on the shadowy brick. On the ground several meters in front of it, a stationary bicycle beckons for investigation from the viewer.

As the viewer pedals the bicycle, he discovers that the phantom horse moves accordingly, animated by a mysterious system of projecting lights and turning gears. The viewer pedals more vigorously, the gears rotate more quickly, and the horse of light breaks into a gallop. Sitting in the saddle, the viewer creates a shadow that lines up with the horse, casting himself as a jockey in the projected world, galloping through the empty pastures of a fictitious world at an exhilarating pace.

It’s not clear to me if the connection is intentional or coincidence, but I’d like to think it’s a modern interactive interpretation of an important historical moment.

More information here

In 1878 Eadweard Muybridge was hired by Leland Stanford to answer the question if a ho